Page 1 of 2
#1
tl/dr: Spent half a decade playing and learning about music, interned at a studio, played and then got kicked out of a band. I want to make a living off music but I'm not sure what direction I should go in.

I started playing acoustic guitar about 3 years ago in the summer before 10th grade. I picked it up at first just to kill time but I started putting more and more time into it. I got my first electric guitar, an Epi LP, that Christmas and started playing the **** out of that, too. I wanted to form a band, but no one I knew was much of a musician, so I basically just played by my self and with my various instructors.

Then, 2 summers ago, I was chilling alone on the balcony of my grandparents house on the beach of Deleware, rocking out to some new music. I had finally procured the entire Zeppelin discography and was hurriedly absorbing all the lesser known songs I couldn't readily find on Limewire. It was then I heard the Lemon Song. I sat down, and decided then and there I had picked up the wrong instrument. I bought a Mexican-made Fender Jazz bass soon after, and have been playing it almost exclusively ever since.

I took a music theory class at my high school, along with a few dozen vocal lessons from this really chill guy, and learned a good amount of theory. I started actually jamming with other musicians, too. Mostly just poorly contrived covers and hastily written songs, but it was fun.

Last year around December I started interning at this recording studio about a block from where I live. It was cool, I'd basically just sit there and listen to him mix recordings for his clients, or hop on the bass and jam with him on guitar or drums. he'd have me moving equipment and cleaning stuff every once and awhile, and then pay me in small amounts of weed. It was cool, but I couldn't commit enough time due to highschool and never really learned anything about the recording process or music business, so I just stopped going eventually after a few months.

It was around that time that this guitarist I knew introduced me to his band, as they were looking for a bass player. I jammed with them and they accepted me, though my friend left just as I joined. I learned the basslines they had already written for their songs, and then wrote my own for the rest. I played something like 5 shows with them over the course of a couple months, it was some of the most fun I've had. Unfortunately I left (read: got kicked out) because of practice issues. The band had a practice space many miles from my home and I did not own a car, so making it out there and back regularly was an issue.

And now, I'm where I am. 19, bandless, no job, living at home and going to a cheap but decent community college part-time. I don't want to give up on music, but I'm not sure what I should do now. I want to make a living off of music; not necessarily preforming it, but I want it to be my future. What do I do?
Last edited by NorseGodofRock at Sep 27, 2009,
#2
The only way to be in the music industry, is to be in the music industry. I tell everyone who wants to be a musician to learn how to read music, get a degree in jazz performance, and be ok with small pay and often bad work conditions. If that's the price they are willing to pay to play music every day, they'll be fine.
You say you don't necessarily want to be playing music, but doing something associated with it. The LAST thing you should do is try to become an engineer. It's a great skill to have, a terrible one to try and market. Over the past 15 years, studio gear has gotten cheaper and cheaper. Most musicians can now afford a demo studio in their own bedroom. At the same time, recording schools have popped up, so the market is flooded with too many trained engineers, in a field where demand for such pros is shrinking. So you have to ask yourself, what is my niche? What do I do well? Once you have that figured out, your position in the industry will be clear. If you're well organized, tough, and a people person, you are basically built to be a tour manager. If you listen to every kind of music (and I mean that literally), are able to compose on the spot, and have an ear for a melody, you could write jingles. Do you see what I mean? Play to your strengths.
Oh, and if none of this sounds appealing, and you just want to be a rock star: you are in the wrong business.
#3
I would find another studio to work at. maybe move out of your parents house and go to a more musical city. I have the luck of living in Nashville and there is no shortage of recording studios here.
#4
koslack, that is probably the best answer I have seen to any question on here.
Gibson SG Special Ebony
Epiphone Sheraton w/ Seymour Duncan JB and SH-1 '59
Fender 1985 Made in Japan Stratocaster
Ibanez S470 DXQM Charcoal Brown
Simon Patrick CW Spruce Top Acoustic
#5
^^I agree. Koslack's answer is awesome.


I believe you should stay in school. Get a degree in something that will allow you to have a backup job. Then, you wouldn't have to worry if you failed in the music industry. With no worries, you could really focus on being good at your chosen trade.
#6
So if an engineer is not a very good career choice, would it still be prudent to try the internship again? Also, Have session/studio musicians suffered the same fate as engineers?

What else is there? I'd obviously prefer performance and I'm currently trying to form a band, but I realize that even putting 100% of my self into it wont guarantee a salary I can live on.
#7
If you want to have a decent salary, then there are hunderends of jobs that you can go for,, becuase being a musician dosent always guarentee you money. What you need to do is get a steady job, that pays decent, and slowly work your way up to being a full time musician. Nobody just got there by studying music and internships, they made music that people liked and slowly got famous. But while they did that they had a job, possible at McDonolds. You'll get there, you just have to be pacient.
#8
degrees in jazz are worthless just get a good teacher and move move to new york and play with as much people as possible
Last edited by acoolbuffguy at Sep 27, 2009,
#9
Quote by ethan_hanus
If you want to have a decent salary, then there are hunderends of jobs that you can go for,, becuase being a musician dosent always guarentee you money. What you need to do is get a steady job, that pays decent, and slowly work your way up to being a full time musician. Nobody just got there by studying music and internships, they made music that people liked and slowly got famous. But while they did that they had a job, possible at McDonolds. You'll get there, you just have to be pacient.


I mean yeah, I'm jobless right now out of circumstance, not choice. It's getting to the full time musician part that I'm asking about.
#10
Like I said, it takes time, a full time musician is like Pearl Jam or Chevelle status. That takes a long time to get to. Just think about it, how long do you think it took them to get to that point? Long freaken time. You need to have a backup plan in case things dont work out, which does happen. I'm not saying that the will, but if you have nothing else to fall back on then you'll end up back at your parents house.

What you need to do is get a firm footing in life, then persue your music career. What I'm gona do is get a degree in Automotive Mechanics and do that for a few years till I'm finically safe, then try to get into a major band, or start my own. Thats my plan, I would assume that a similar plan would work for you.
#11
Quote by NorseGodofRock
So if an engineer is not a very good career choice, would it still be prudent to try the internship again? Also, Have session/studio musicians suffered the same fate as engineers?

What else is there? I'd obviously prefer performance and I'm currently trying to form a band, but I realize that even putting 100% of my self into it wont guarantee a salary I can live on.


Do the internship if only to learn how to operate a studio. It probably won't earn you any money, but it will save you cash later on if you want to engineer sessions for your own material.
As for session musicians, to guarantee a steady income, you need to know how to play many different genres. It's rare for somebody to get a call for a rock session. The most common sessions are in jazz, and classical is common also. To get those gigs, you have to be an excellent notation reader.
Trying to make it as a rock star is basically playing the lottery. You have a better chance of being struck by lightning.
#12
if you want to make music you should make music, but probably get some sort of job that you can make money from in the mean time.
jimi hendrix failed music class but he didnt give up.
and theres worse things in life than failing in the music industry.
#13
Quote by ethan_hanus
Like I said, it takes time, a full time musician is like Pearl Jam or Chevelle status. That takes a long time to get to. Just think about it, how long do you think it took them to get to that point? Long freaken time. You need to have a backup plan in case things dont work out, which does happen. I'm not saying that the will, but if you have nothing else to fall back on then you'll end up back at your parents house.

What you need to do is get a firm footing in life, then persue your music career. What I'm gona do is get a degree in Automotive Mechanics and do that for a few years till I'm finically safe, then try to get into a major band, or start my own. Thats my plan, I would assume that a similar plan would work for you.



Interesting choice of bands, but ok...
It takes more than time. It takes time, skill, luck, being in the right place at the right time, luck, a willingness to drop everything in a second to go on tour for 6 months, luck, being ok with eating nothing above fast food for weeks, luck, business savvy, luck, marketability, a great team behind you, and oh by the way, did I mention luck?
#14
^ya mostly luck, i mean clapton got picked up of the streets from the music label cause he looked cool, they gave him a record deal, and the first time he picked up a guitar he could play and write songs instantly. same with dylan, any artists you like, that was luck, no hard work involved.
#15
Quote by yabes24
^ya mostly luck, i mean clapton got picked up of the streets from the music label cause he looked cool, they gave him a record deal, and the first time he picked up a guitar he could play and write songs instantly. same with dylan, any artists you like, that was luck, no hard work involved.



Thank you for deliberately misconstruing what I just wrote. You truly a living testament to every failure inherent in the American education system.
#16
Quote by koslack
Thank you for deliberately misconstruing what I just wrote. You truly a living testament to every failure inherent in the American education system.

ya, thanks i try.
#17
lawl, I like koslack.

I think when it comes to making it "big" it does take a great deal of luck, but for other performance jobs there are ways to seriously help your chances of getting a job. Reading notation is a huge advantage, if you want a studio job you need to be able to be called in and read/play whatever is there for you, immediately. None of the guys who go on about 'feeling' everything out and ignoring notation will ever be successful in a performance job (unless they're the needle in the haystack that gets chosen to be promoted by a major label). And an insane amount of practice and putting yourself out there is necessary for any sort of performance gig anyway. Anyone half assing it in the music business will not last long at all. If you approach guitar as a casual hobby you have a 1 in 10 million chance of ever getting a successful career out of it. If you approach guitar as a serious career choice you have a 1 in 3 million chance of making it :p.

(all statistics in the post were purely fictional, simply used to make a point)
Quote by acjshapiro

Quote by Vrstone87

meh, I've listened to every radiohead album and honestly don't get what everyone loves about them.....


cause you're ****ing stupid

#18
I started to play on guitar, when I was 13. I felt in love with a girl, who didn't loved me. My brother putted his guitar in my hand and I started to play on it. It was great. So I decided: I'll learn to play on guitar to playing love songs for that girl.

Then that girl moved to a religious school (now she's a *****), and I started to think about forming a nu metal band. My classmates wanted to play punk rock, then I helped them, where to go. But in the fact, we never ever jammed. They became to dislike me for my better grades and they knocked out. Then I stopped to learn, now I'm in a dangerous secondary school.

My guitar theacher helped me a lot. If he's not present, I may stared to cut my arms, like those emo kids (I have more reason for it). My parents forcing me to be an electic engineer and they think, I'm a genius in it. But at the sanitarium, I realised my real world: Music. I decided to start a music career, even I'll become poor. I also going to leave hungary, after finishing school. In this ****ty country you work till death for nothing. Even you are an electric engineer.
#19
Quote by ZILtoid_1991
I started to play on guitar, when I was 13. I felt in love with a girl, who didn't loved me. My brother putted his guitar in my hand and I started to play on it. It was great. So I decided: I'll learn to play on guitar to playing love songs for that girl.

Then that girl moved to a religious school (now she's a *****), and I started to think about forming a nu metal band. My classmates wanted to play punk rock, then I helped them, where to go. But in the fact, we never ever jammed. They became to dislike me for my better grades and they knocked out. Then I stopped to learn, now I'm in a dangerous secondary school.

My guitar theacher helped me a lot. If he's not present, I may stared to cut my arms, like those emo kids (I have more reason for it). My parents forcing me to be an electic engineer and they think, I'm a genius in it. But at the sanitarium, I realised my real world: Music. I decided to start a music career, even I'll become poor. I also going to leave hungary, after finishing school. In this ****ty country you work till death for nothing. Even you are an electric engineer.


Ey nem bezelek majdaro.
That's probably not grammatically correct, but I tried.
#20
Quote by koslack
Interesting choice of bands, but ok...
It takes more than time. It takes time, skill, luck, being in the right place at the right time, luck, a willingness to drop everything in a second to go on tour for 6 months, luck, being ok with eating nothing above fast food for weeks, luck, business savvy, luck, marketability, a great team behind you, and oh by the way, did I mention luck?


luck may be a factor, but not that much.

http://tomhess.net/articles/HowToBecomeAProfessionalPart1.aspx
#22
Quote by koslack
Explain that to the hundreds of thousands of bands that fell by the wayside.
If you want to be a professional, it's doable. Go to school, learn to read, and constantly meet people. If you want to be a rock star, you're playing the lottery. It's that simple.


you obviously didn't read the whole thing. and unless you are in a successful band that has "made it" or work for a major record label then how do you "know" anything?
Last edited by The4thHorsemen at Sep 28, 2009,
#23
People in today's pop industry get in by luck.

An A&R guy has got enough bands to choose from that will sell.

It's hard to become famous, but you can have a nice balance of income/fun if touring with a band.

There are loads of (small) venues that will take a band with a relative good sound/repertoire.

I was in a small band, and made 80 bucks a night including free beer and meal.

Not much, but for playing 1 hour it does make your "going out time" more productive, and arguably way more fun.

I personally think that the best chance you have if you consider the factors: Income/ reliability/market is composing for movie/tv (general media) and/or computer games.

Musical skill is arguably way more important in this musical profession, and it probably has the steadiest and biggest market.

Composing in general gives you also the most leverage.

The "Re-incarnation of Plato" Award 2009
(most intelligent)
The "Good Samaritan" Award 2009 (most helpful)

[font="Palatino Linotype
Who's Andy Timmons??
Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Sep 28, 2009,
#24
Quote by The4thHorsemen
you obviously didn't read the whole thing. and unless you are in a successful band that has "made it" or work for a major record label then how do you "know" anything?


I spent about a decade working in the music industry. The article is PACKED with inconsistencies, fabrications, and vagueness. For instance: "Music industry companies aren’t going to invest hundreds of thousands of dollars into an artist/band's music career unless these companies are TOTALLY CERTAIN they are going to make a lot of money (and not lose their huge financial and time investments)." Well, if this were true, why is it that 9 out 10 releases (not just on majors, the numbers are similar on indies) lose money? That 1 out of 10 is so successful as to cover the losses of the others (or at least that was the case up until about 10 years ago, since then most labels have been putting up numbers that are written in bright red ink. But I digress). And if the article is so accurate, I guess you're well on your way to rock star status, right?
For that matter, why isn't Tom Hess a rock star? The guy doesn't even have an entry on wikipedia.
I will repeat my point: If you want to be a professional musician, you need to be able to read, nail things on the first take, do not consider yourself above playing in lounges, cruise ships, etc..., be ok with playing jazz, classical, showtunes and many other genres, and be ok with small pay and often bad working conditions. If this is the price you are willing to pay, by all means. If you want to be a rock star, go stand out in the rain with a metal pole, because you've got a better chance at the lightning.
Last edited by koslack at Sep 28, 2009,
#25
Quote by The4thHorsemen
you obviously didn't read the whole thing. and unless you are in a successful band that has "made it" or work for a major record label then how do you "know" anything?


Ah... are YOU in a successful band that has "made it" or work for a major record label??
Quote by acjshapiro

Quote by Vrstone87

meh, I've listened to every radiohead album and honestly don't get what everyone loves about them.....


cause you're ****ing stupid

#26
Quote by koslack
For that matter, why isn't Tom Hess a rock star? The guy doesn't even have an entry on wikipedia.

you answered your own question, everyone knows rockstars need wikipedias, your not so bad.

but ts, you should probably find something to do while your looking for a job in music, a regular job, or go to school for something else, maybe you could end up doing both things the guitarist from queen went to school to be an astrophysicist, co-wrote a book on the history of the universe, and wrote other books about things in the universe, and he is also a rockstar.
#27
Although I Find HESS a bit weird, he has some great tips on how to develop legato.

He also has some good advice on how to develop speed, which I use in my own lessons as well.

Don't know anything about his pay-by-lessons though.

The "Re-incarnation of Plato" Award 2009
(most intelligent)
The "Good Samaritan" Award 2009 (most helpful)

[font="Palatino Linotype
Who's Andy Timmons??
#28
Quote by koslack
I spent about a decade working in the music industry. The article is PACKED with inconsistencies, fabrications, and vagueness. For instance: "Music industry companies aren’t going to invest hundreds of thousands of dollars into an artist/band's music career unless these companies are TOTALLY CERTAIN they are going to make a lot of money (and not lose their huge financial and time investments)." Well, if this were true, why is it that 9 out 10 releases (not just on majors, the numbers are similar on indies) lose money? That 1 out of 10 is so successful as to cover the losses of the others (or at least that was the case up until about 10 years ago, since then most labels have been putting up numbers that are written in bright red ink. But I digress). And if the article is so accurate, I guess you're well on your way to rock star status, right?
For that matter, why isn't Tom Hess a rock star? The guy doesn't even have an entry on wikipedia.
I will repeat my point: If you want to be a professional musician, you need to be able to read, nail things on the first take, do not consider yourself above playing in lounges, cruise ships, etc..., be ok with playing jazz, classical, showtunes and many other genres, and be ok with small pay and often bad working conditions. If this is the price you are willing to pay, by all means. If you want to be a rock star, go stand out in the rain with a metal pole, because you've got a better chance at the lightning.


what artists have proved that luck is the main factor on becoming a rock star? i think luck can be defined as opportunity plus preparation, there is no sheer luck, opportunities may present themselves every single day, but if you're not prepared to take them and work them to your advantage then luck doesn't work, does it?
i think it's 50% 50% preparation-opportunity. i mean maybe i can't find another reason why great musicians like Tom Hess aren't famous or important enough to get an entry on Wikipedia, but i refuse to believe luck is the only things that separates a good musician from that good musician becoming a rock star. maybe it's because i hate to think that these things aren't controled by oneself, but by how destiny or some crap like that wants it too. and maybe these guys that didn't make were waiting for the opportunity to come along by just sitting to wait for them, and if they'd thought otherwise maybe they would have gone after them, and who knows, may have "made it"
#29
Quote by koslack
I spent about a decade working in the music industry. The article is PACKED with inconsistencies, fabrications, and vagueness. For instance: "Music industry companies aren’t going to invest hundreds of thousands of dollars into an artist/band's music career unless these companies are TOTALLY CERTAIN they are going to make a lot of money (and not lose their huge financial and time investments)." Well, if this were true, why is it that 9 out 10 releases (not just on majors, the numbers are similar on indies) lose money? That 1 out of 10 is so successful as to cover the losses of the others (or at least that was the case up until about 10 years ago, since then most labels have been putting up numbers that are written in bright red ink. But I digress). And if the article is so accurate, I guess you're well on your way to rock star status, right?
For that matter, why isn't Tom Hess a rock star? The guy doesn't even have an entry on wikipedia.
I will repeat my point: If you want to be a professional musician, you need to be able to read, nail things on the first take, do not consider yourself above playing in lounges, cruise ships, etc..., be ok with playing jazz, classical, showtunes and many other genres, and be ok with small pay and often bad working conditions. If this is the price you are willing to pay, by all means. If you want to be a rock star, go stand out in the rain with a metal pole, because you've got a better chance at the lightning.


sorry for stepping on your e-penis, it was laying on the floor and I wasn't looking, I'll be more careful next time.
#30
Quote by acoolbuffguy
degrees in jazz are worthless just get a good teacher and move move to new york and play with as much people as possible


I guess microtonal music isnt the only thing that you have no clue about?

At TS, a simple question. How old are you, and do you plan and investing in a college education
#31
To the TS - some non-musical advice: work on getting a car if you don't have one, even if it's a POS. Get a job, even if it's just delivering pizzas. There are lots of possibilities for stuff you could do to further you musical career, but most of it doesn't open up until you have a way of getting around, and a little bit of money.
#32
Quote by Maru717
what artists have proved that luck is the main factor on becoming a rock star? i think luck can be defined as opportunity plus preparation, there is no sheer luck, opportunities may present themselves every single day, but if you're not prepared to take them and work them to your advantage then luck doesn't work, does it?
i think it's 50% 50% preparation-opportunity. i mean maybe i can't find another reason why great musicians like Tom Hess aren't famous or important enough to get an entry on Wikipedia, but i refuse to believe luck is the only things that separates a good musician from that good musician becoming a rock star. maybe it's because i hate to think that these things aren't controled by oneself, but by how destiny or some crap like that wants it too. and maybe these guys that didn't make were waiting for the opportunity to come along by just sitting to wait for them, and if they'd thought otherwise maybe they would have gone after them, and who knows, may have "made it"



There are literally hundreds of thousands of bands out there. A good chunk of them are doing all the things you need to do to get signed, but it's not happening.
Then you have the 9 out of 10 bands who do get signed, and are dropped after a single release. How do you explain those?
You have to be the right sound, at the right time, with the right look, knowing the right people, and even then, odds are not in your favour. Believe me, if there was a formula, it would have been perfected by now, instead of 90% of artists LOSING money on their releases. There are a lot of hard working, talented people out there, and very few of them get to live the dream.
#34
Find out how to make tires for bikes that don't go flat AND have the same comfort as a normal tire. Then move to Holland and be rich.
#35
Quote by deHufter
Find out how to make tires for bikes that don't go flat AND have the same comfort as a normal tire. Then move to Holland and be rich.



+10000



I actually had a flat tire this morning ffs.

The "Re-incarnation of Plato" Award 2009
(most intelligent)
The "Good Samaritan" Award 2009 (most helpful)

[font="Palatino Linotype
Who's Andy Timmons??
#36
Ive been browsing through this thread and everyone on both sides makes great points.

There is one thing however that is bothering me about how its like hitting the lotto to become a rockstar. While I do agree with that statement to some extent because it sure as hell is not easy in the slightest, there is one thing I have to point out. You will never know if its possible for you/your band unless you give it a serious full hearted try.

To say its next to impossible and it will never happen for 99% of people is the same as completely giving up before even trying in my opinion. Then you are a pessimist, a person who sees the glass as half empty, and you will never go anywhere with that attitude to begin with.

If you go into it believing you dont have a chance at making it anyway, then why should you?

If you dont believe you have a shot, then you never did.

Success doesnt come find you, you have to go banging on its door to even get a shot at being let in.

The second you doubt yourself, you've already lost the battle.

And even if you try for the rest of your life and it doesnt happen. At least you can say you actually tried, and didnt roll over and decide to give up on your dream.
--Clips in profile! comment please!--
Guitars
Schecter C-1 Hellraiser
Schecter Solo-6 Limited
Takamine G330H

Amps
Line 6 Vetta
Carvin X100B

Pedals
cmatmods Signa Drive, Brownie, and Boost
Morley Bad Horsie 2 Wah
MXR 10 band EQ
Last edited by Dragonis at Oct 1, 2009,
#37
Quote by Dragonis
Ive been browsing through this thread and everyone on both sides makes great points.

There is one thing however that is bothering me about how its like hitting the lotto to become a rockstar. While I do agree with that statement to some extent because it sure as hell is not easy in the slightest, there is one thing I have to point out. You will never know if its possible for you/your band unless you give it a serious full hearted try.

To say its next to impossible and it will never happen for 99% of people is the same as completely giving up before even trying in my opinion. Then you are a pessimist, a person who sees the glass as half empty, and you will never go anywhere with that attitude to begin with.

If you go into it believing you dont have a chance at making it anyway, then why should you?

If you dont believe you have a shot, then you never did.

Success doesnt come find you, you have to go banging on its door to even get a shot at being let in.

The second you doubt yourself, you've already lost the battle.

And even if you try for the rest of your life and it doesnt happen. At least you can say you actually tried, and didnt roll over and decide to give up on your dream.



The problem with this is that your window for trying is also generally the same window you have to get an education. People in North America and Europe are blessed by the fact that everyone who wants to can get an education. People who get tempted by the rock star dream need to dedicate their lives to it, just to even have that one in a million chance. You have to tour, tour, tour, record, tour. And that's not just for a year or two, because you never know when you'll meet that person who gets you somewhere. So next thing you know, 5 years has passed, you're almost 30, you have no education, no marketable job skills, no wife/girlfriend because you've been on the road for 10 years, you have no money... It's a great way to ruin your life. You see those guys in guitar stores who are 40 and completely miserable? This is what happened to them.
#38
Quote by yabes24
^ya mostly luck, i mean clapton got picked up of the streets from the music label cause he looked cool, they gave him a record deal, and the first time he picked up a guitar he could play and write songs instantly. same with dylan, any artists you like, that was luck, no hard work involved.



Some people say you either "have it" (natural talent) or you don't have it. I sort of tend to agree with that but then how can you explain George Harrison? I heard in an old interview "I had to work very hard at the guitar [or music], but ended up in the best band ever. Something to that extent.

Anyway I tried interning at a recording studio also but quit after 10 straight hours of Bolivian folk music.

Get a degree in any field or end up with a ****ty job....
#39
Quote by koslack
If that's all you have to contribute, you've only further proven why I'm right and you're just some kid talking out of his asshole.


I've already contributed with a link that agrees with my thoughts on the subject and explains them much better than I could. I don't believe in luck. anything you call luck could be created. you say there's just as much a chance of being struck by lightning? alright, well I can increase my chances of being struck by lightning by a lot if I build a huge metal tower and stand on it. I could even make my own lightning if I wanted to.


you tend to state a lot of absolutes with no sources or credibility, and then you try to act like you're carrying on a debate.
#40
Quote by The4thHorsemen
I've already contributed with a link that agrees with my thoughts on the subject and explains them much better than I could. I don't believe in luck. anything you call luck could be created. you say there's just as much a chance of being struck by lightning? alright, well I can increase my chances of being struck by lightning by a lot if I build a huge metal tower and stand on it. I could even make my own lightning if I wanted to.


you tend to state a lot of absolutes with no sources or credibility, and then you try to act like you're carrying on a debate.



And I pointed out all the flaws in that article. You did not respond.
Also, if you know so much about making it, I'm still waiting for you to shut my mouth with multi-platinum sales. Any day now.
As for my credibility, my credentials are well known. I've worked in the industry, you have not. So please, give me another article by some no name guy showing me how I can also be a rock star. But quite frankly, until you've actually walked the walk, you're just some little kid, acting tough on the internet. I've been there, you have not, so shut your mouth and try to learn something.
Page 1 of 2