#1
ok so this is my first guitar ive ever had with a tremolo system and i was wondering do the nuts at the base of the head need to stay on...i mean those three nuts that are suppose to keep your guitar in tune...i was wondering because my guitar has been going outa tune badly...i thought it was just because this is a new guitar...but there has been no improvement so far
#2
1. Are the springs in the back of the trem cavity set at the appropriate tension for the tuning and string gauge? (The tremolo body should sit flush/level with the body of the guitar).
2. Is the intonation set correctly?
3. Is the truss rod set for a different gauge of strings and/or tuning if you've changed it since purchase?
4. Did you stretch your strings then re-tunebefore you locked the nut down?
5. Didn't you ask how to set up a double locking trem before you bought a guitar with one?
Do you feel warm within your cage?

And have you figured out yet -


Life goes by?
Quote by Hydra150
There's a dick on Earth, too
It's you
#3
Quote by BukitHedCrazee
ok so this is my first guitar ive ever had with a tremolo system and i was wondering do the nuts at the base of the head need to stay on...i mean those three nuts that are suppose to keep your guitar in tune...i was wondering because my guitar has been going outa tune badly...i thought it was just because this is a new guitar...but there has been no improvement so far



It's happening because you are a Tremolo bridge n00b. The user above me has given you all the check points. Yet if you still don't understand it, you can go to www.ibanezrules.com and read about tuning and maintaining your tremolo bridge. There are a lot of videos on youtube too. Read all the material and then work on your guitar.
#5
Quote by BukitHedCrazee
omfg you made that sound like rocket science...

If you're saying that four steps to set up a trem is like rocket science, you made an erroneous purchase, in which case it should be returned and exchanged for a guitar with a stop tail bridge.
Do you feel warm within your cage?

And have you figured out yet -


Life goes by?
Quote by Hydra150
There's a dick on Earth, too
It's you
#7
Quote by strat0blaster
If you're saying that four steps to set up a trem is like rocket science, you made an erroneous purchase, in which case it should be returned and exchanged for a guitar with a stop tail bridge.


Are you telling me theyre out of dragons?
They never had dragons..
Who didnt?
The world..
GET THIS GUY OUT OF HERE, FIND ME A DRAGON
#8
Quote by glenthemann

Not to sound like a self-*****, but that is fully sig-worthy. Just pointing it out.
Do you feel warm within your cage?

And have you figured out yet -


Life goes by?
Quote by Hydra150
There's a dick on Earth, too
It's you
#9
Are they new strings? New strings will need to be stretched until they stay in tune.

Loosen the strings till they're slack. Block the trem (both directions), with picks or other objects thin enough to get the trem level. The highest surface of the trem should be parallel with the body. Set the fine tuning screws on the trem to the halfway position. Then stretch each string, retune (with a chromatic tuner, not by ear), stretch, retune, etc until the tuning doesn't change. Have some extra "b" and high "e" strings on hand 'cause you'll probably break a few of them stretching. I've changed strings on floyd roses a bunch of times now and I still break them sometimes.

After all the strings are stable and in tune, then pull the block out in front of the trem (under the springs). If the block behind the trem is loose, then loosen the claw screws (evenly) until the block is tight. Then loosen the claw screws slowly (1/8th turn at a time) so that the block just slips out. Then re-tune. If the tuning doesn't stabiliize by the third attempt, then your claw screws aren't quite the right tension.

This takes a lot of patience. After doing it a few times you learn to anticipate a bit and it goes faster. The first time can take several hours.

When the tuning is right (and doesn't change after mild whammy use), then go ahead and lock down the nut. Then you'll need to re-tune with the fine-tuning screws on the trem because the pressure on the nut when you lock the strings changes the tuning.

Once you do this, if you do it right, you shouldn't have to mess with it again for a long time. My Ibanez with an Edge III trem went 8 months+ without losing tune at all. And that was with daily whammy abuse.

Yes, you do need to lock the strings down at the nut, because otherwise the tuning pegs would loosen quickly and you'd have to tune it frequently like you would with a vintage trem. That would be an incredible pain since it takes so long to get it right.
#10
The others mentioned youtube videos. Some are better than others. When you find a video that matches the way I described it to you, then use that one.

I wasted more time when I was a noob at this by trying to follow the wrong videos.

Also check out the Seymour Duncan pickup installation video (on a Les Paul) (from the SD website) for the best way to get your strings on the pegs.

If you decide your intonation is off, then I recommend taking it to a guitar tech or luthier (not at Guitar Center) to get that adjusted (at least until you get extremely comfortable with working on the trem, and maybe get some special tools).