#1
I'm looking for a mic set that i can use to record a cranked vox ac30h2. and by cranked i mean at absolute full volume, i've hate the mic i have now.

i was looking at the CAD joe satriani mic set because its pretty cheap, but i have doubts about its quality.

so, what would be the best i could do for clearly recording a very, very loud vox AC30, for say under $600.

im fine with going used

EDIT: also using it live would be awesome to, so factor that in
Last edited by Lt. Shinysides at Sep 28, 2009,
#2
dinamic mics are not that different...
check the frequency responce..

imo i suggest you getting a dinamic and a condenser, then record in stereo
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#3
The Shure SM57 is pretty standard. You could try a Beta 57 if you're adventurous.

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#4
Quote by Lt. Shinysides
I'm looking for a mic set that i can use to record a cranked vox ac30h2. and by cranked i mean at absolute full volume, i've hate the mic i have now.

i was looking at the CAD joe satriani mic set because its pretty cheap, but i have doubts about its quality.

so, what would be the best i could do for clearly recording a very, very loud vox AC30, for say under $600.

im fine with going used

EDIT: also using it live would be awesome to, so factor that in



i would say an SM57 i used one to record all my guitar stuff but if ur worried about the volume being an issue but love a cranked tone maby look into a hot playe or some form of attenuator so u can get tht cranked tone at lower volumes
#6
Quote by GuitarUser
dinamic mics are not that different...
check the frequency responce..

imo i suggest you getting a dinamic and a condenser, then record in stereo


This will give you great results and a nice thick full tone Condenser aimed at the edge of the speaker cone and dynamic about a foot or two back imo
#7
Quote by GuitarUser
dinamic mics are not that different...
check the frequency responce..

imo i suggest you getting a dinamic and a condenser, then record in stereo


+1 to this and the SM57
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#8
Quote by GuitarUser
dinamic mics are not that different...
check the frequency responce..

imo i suggest you getting a dinamic and a condenser, then record in stereo
This.

Any good quality dynamic ( Audix i5, Shure SM57, AKG D770, Electrovoice ND967, Sennheiser E906 etc etc), and perhaps a nice condenser to add some depth will get you a great tone.

A dynamic mic should be able to withstand the high SPL you get right up against the speaker grille of a cranked amp, though a condenser will probably need to be at least a foot or two back.


$600 is massive overkill for just mic'ing a guitar amp - I suggest you spend the majority of the money on good preamps etc instead.
And any dynamic mic will be fine for live use.
#9
SM57 straight on, about 2" from the center of the cone, touching the grill cloth.

I wouls also add a condenser with a db pad about 4 feet back and 4 feet off the ground, centered. In a big boomy room, or if you're getting stray echo (which you probably will with that amp cranked!), move the amp a foot or two closer and a foot or two lower, but move closer carefully.

If it's painful to put your ear there, it's painful for a condenser mic, too...
#11
an SM57 would manage it fine but you've got $600 so there's probably better stuff.

What i'd do is keep a sm57 up close to the amp and then put maybe a condensor somewhere else in teh room to pick up the ambience then i'd mix the two signals. You can't crank an amp and put a condensor too close though, thats a general rule of thumb
#12
When I recorded guitars for our album this summer, we got nice results from a SM58 on the cone, and a CAD or SEelectronic's condensor mic for the room, we found more towards the back and quite low down to the cab was best for the room mic. So consider 2 mics!
#14
Quote by WtrPlyr
with $600 you can get a monsterous mic



i dont want just one though, i'd like to get a set of a few of them. i know $600 could buy me one hell of a condenser mic, but then thats all i've got.
#15
Shure SM57. If you listen to the first few Van Halen albums Eddie had his Plexi fully cranked with two SM 57's. They are an industry standard for a reason.
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#16
I agree with the people saying get a SM57 and a condenser. You shouldn't need to spend 600 bucks on mics, probably better off spending more on other recording equipment and just getting a sm57 and a decent quality condenser.
#17
i think i'm going to give the SM57 since it seems to be very highly recommended everywhere i look, any suggestions on a condenser that i keep close to the speaker capable of handling the volume?
#18
mic models are very, very different, and so are individual mics within each model range. think of them like instruments in and of themselves. you really need to try them out and see what sounds best to you for your setup.

call and see if your local music store will let you bring your amp in to test some mics. you should NOT crank it off the back -- while there is some risk of damaging the diaphragm, there's more of a risk of the store owner/manager/employees punching you in the face.

the sm57 is a staple moving coil mic for a reason, though it's not always the best.

it's funny: you can tell pretty easily who has experience with recording and who doesn't in this thread, as $600 is pocket change when it comes to mics. even going used, you'll be lucky to find a decent condenser for 600 bucks. (in pro audio) mics will kill your credit a lost faster and to a much higher degree than guitars.
#19
Here is a question. What style of music are you playing?

Use a Shure SM-57 on the side (middle of the cone) and you should be good. REMEMBER WHERE YOU PUT THE MICS!!!! Your tone will change on where you put the mic. Use some chalk on the grill for reference and tape a ruler to your mic for distance.

If you really like low tones to come out, pop an AKG D 112 (kick drum mic) in the open back of the AC30. Along with a Shure SM-57 in front. Mainly use for metal or darker sounds though.

Using two SM-57 next to the speaker cone requires a lot of detail and precision because of phasing. This can throw off your recording if not put in the same spot every time.
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#20
Quote by climhazzard


it's funny: you can tell pretty easily who has experience with recording and who doesn't in this thread, as $600 is pocket change when it comes to mics. even going used, you'll be lucky to find a decent condenser for 600 bucks.



i noticed that to. i've got an uncle who is a studio musician, he has a condenser mic worth more than $3000. ONE mic.


i know $600 is pretty much a beginners set up for a few mics, but realistically its just to record a few demos and to mic the amp for a show my band is playing at a live venue. ill start looking at the real serious high quality stuff once i've got a bit more saved up
#21
Quote by charles753df
Here is a question. What style of music are you playing?



i use the vox for classic rock, blues, and "U2-esque" delayed cleans.

i've also got a Deluxe Reverb that i use for country and sharp clean tones, but i don't plan on recording with it or using it live for a while.

to get an idea of the kind of tone i play with, think of a mix of Jimmy Page, Mark Knopfler, Clapton, The Edge, and SRV.


ill try and list as much as i can since i know it all makes a very large difference on the quality of the recording. the AC30H2 is hand wired if that makes any difference for you guys.
Last edited by Lt. Shinysides at Sep 28, 2009,
#22
Quote by Lt. Shinysides
i noticed that to. i've got an uncle who is a studio musician, he has a condenser mic worth more than $3000. ONE mic.


i know $600 is pretty much a beginners set up for a few mics, but realistically its just to record a few demos and to mic the amp for a show my band is playing at a live venue. ill start looking at the real serious high quality stuff once i've got a bit more saved up


i used a pair of telefunkens last week to record an acoustic guitar. each one cost over $11k. and those aren't the most expensive mics the studio has (and the studio i work at isn't even a recording studio -- we've got some recording gear, but we do mostly mixing, post, and some mastering).
#23
Quote by Lt. Shinysides
i think i'm going to give the SM57 since it seems to be very highly recommended everywhere i look

It doesn't mean it's always the best choice, people just seem to love jumping on the bandwagon. It's widely used because it's durable and emphasises guitar in a way that makes sound great in a mix.

However, there's a lot of other great dynamic mics out there for guitar cabs and they've all got different strengths and weaknesses - shop around and make your own informed decision.
#24
Quote by climhazzard
i used a pair of telefunkens last week to record an acoustic guitar. each one cost over $11k. and those aren't the most expensive mics the studio has (and the studio i work at isn't even a recording studio -- we've got some recording gear, but we do mostly mixing, post, and some mastering).


I'm glad that wasn't me. I can totally picture myself turning to ask someone a question, knocking something over and sending an $11,000 mic crashing to the ground, hahaha.
#25
$600 won't get you an insane or monstrous mic by any means...however it will get you a few SM57's and some cash to spare. Ideally, I would suggest a Royer R121 ribbon, however those are about $1100 a piece.
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#26
ide go with an EV787 and a sm58 beta. around $240 new, $175 used if you can find them. the sm57 is the standard, but not the best imo, fwiw.
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