#1
I'm wondering if you guys have any thoughts on how different guitars are more responsive to subtleties in finger pressure and attack. For example, is the most important factor the hollowness or lack thereof of the body? Could you generalize and say an acoustic is more responsive than an archtop is more responsive than a semi-hollow is more responsive than a solid body? And does the wood of the fretboard and/or neck and/or body also play a role?

I'm somebody who thinks that it is of the utmost importance for a guitar to sense the most minute detail in attack, and respond accordingly. Anywho, any thoughts?
Last edited by ShivaSage at Sep 28, 2009,
#3
huhm...i found the acoustics i've played to be less sensitive than solid bodies
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#4
Quote by ShivaSage
I'm somebody who thinks that it is of the utmost importance for a guitar to sense the most minute detail in attack, and respond accordingly. Anywho, any thoughts?

I would have thought the answer here lies in the amp and \ or the recording setup, and not so much in the guitar, with the effective answer being...

Different guitar gives different sounds.
Different means of sound capture and propogation gives "more or less" of those sounds.
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#5
Quote by CarpUK
I would have thought the answer here lies in the amp and \ or the recording setup, and not so much in the guitar

This is what I'd go with.

On the other hand, scalloped guitars are most responsive to fretting hand pressure, since if you push to hard you'll go out of tune. Most guitars with tall frets are like this too, but scalloped ones are the most.

Maybe you could attribute some of the picking stuff to strings and picks, but I'd say that it mostly lies in the amp and recording rig.
#6
pickups prolly make a big difference. single coils are usually more sensitive than humbuckers. I get better dynamics with single coils
#7
The biggest difference a guitar will make is the size of the frets. Smaller frets are less sensitive, while bigger frets will be more sensitive.
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#8
Yeah, It matters. You need to have a very light touch for some guitar necks, Also the lighter the touch on a guitar with high frets, The more intonated the sound.

And someone said "I thought it was all in the amp" Well you're wrong, It is in everything about a player, their guitar, strings, guitar set up, accessories (picks, capos, pedals, ect,) guitar cable, amp and settings.
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#9
Well personally I dont have a lot of acoustic experience, but i find brighter pickups (so bright humbuckers or single coils) to be a lot more responsive and sensitive, mainly casue they are brighter therefore have better clarity. But I think sensitivity all starts in the guitar. For example I played a EVH Wolfgang and its pickups really affect its dynamics. Its really fun to play around with, on some amps you can go from a close to breakup clean to a crunchy gain with different picking attack. The volume knobs also help a lot on the guitar.

So I'd say for a solidbody electric its all in the pickups, cause the amp can only play with what the guitar pickups give it.
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#10
Its picking dynamics, pickups, and amp if you ask me that affect touch sensitivity. One thing that I feel is always true is if the amp isn't responsive to touch nothing before it will matter.
#11
I think wood quality and type matters a lot. Recently, I tried a MIM Strat through a Tiny Terror and it was missing all the responsiveness of my Am. Deluxe Strat through my GT-10. I was quite surprised with this finding. I also noticed the same thing with RGs. My G-400 is damn near unresponsive. When it comes to good quality guitars, I think they're all responsive but in different ways. Hitting the strings hard on a LP is very different from hitting the strings hard on a Strat. Pickups and amp also play a role. But I believe that all tonal characteristics starts in the wood. That responsiveness is very important to me. If it doesn't exist, the guitar is worthless. It can turn an alright solo into a great one. Dynamics can add emotion and feeling to your playing. It's important to have a guitar that reacts to your subtleties.