#1
I have had a Yamaha classical for 30 years. It has always been a wonderful guitar. In the past 2 years the D string randomly breaks. It is not breaking while being played, just when it is laying around.
It usually breaks somewhere between the tuner and nut or the 1st 5 frets.
Does anyone know why, how to fix it and prevent it from happening in the future?
#3
All I can say is put some graphite on the nut
Calender



Quote by Xaldin714
why does Thin Lizzy sing in english if they are from ireland
#4
Quote by majorslady
...It usually breaks somewhere between the tuner and nut or the 1st 5 frets.
Does anyone know why, how to fix it and prevent it from happening in the future?


That is like asking a mechanic why your car keeps stalling online. Dude, take it to a guitar tech.
#5
Quote by fingerguy
That is like asking a mechanic why your car keeps stalling online. Dude, take it to a guitar tech.

I certainly wouldn't take my car to a mechanic if the headrests kept falling off. Not-so-serious problems are great for internet solutions!

Metaphors aside, you most likely just have a bit of a sharp edge on your nut. It could also be a bad set of strings or a bad case of corrosion, but those are less likely. Next time it happens, take a look at the nut slot. Some carefully guided sandpaper or a little pencil graphite could be just the trick.
Last edited by GC Shred Off at Sep 28, 2009,
#6
I have another thought as well. When installing a new D string, are you "playing it in" or are you pre-stretching it to help with the settling in process of the string? This is critical because classical strings MUST be allowed to settle on their own. If you are pre-stretching the string by pulling on it as you are tuning it up for the first time, you are creating thin spots in the string which will lead to premature failure. The brass wound E A and D string of a classical set still have nylon as the core material, rather than steel, and are still prone to this thinning out effect. Steel strings on the other hand benefit from this pre-stretching as they can take the pulling and tugging at them without distorting the string, allowing them to settle in faster.
Last edited by LeftyDave at Sep 28, 2009,
#7
Quote by LeftyDave
I have another thought as well. When installing a new D string, are you "playing it in" or are you pre-stretching it to help with the settling in process of the string? This is critical because classical strings MUST be allowed to settle on their own. If you are pre-stretching the string by pulling on it as you are tuning it up for the first time, you are creating thin spots in the string which will lead to premature failure. The brass wound E A and D string of a classical set still have nylon as the core material, rather than steel, and are still prone to this thinning out effect. Steel strings on the other hand benefit from this pre-stretching as they can take the pulling and tugging at them without distorting the string, allowing them to settle in faster.

DO NOT PRE STRECH NYLON STRINGS

o

I just read the whole post

hitting rwply button anyways
#9
i have and still do have that problem, and it,s on all 3 of my classicals , i was told it,s because the 'D' string is so finely wound , and i,ve tried just about all classical strings that there is almost !! i just learned to live with it.....good luck !........p.s you could always buy a box of 'D' strings!!!......just kidding.hmmmmm i think!
#10
Quote by Tommy Walker
DO NOT PRE STRECH NYLON STRINGS

If you want to retune every 5 minute.