#1
Can anyone tell me on chord progression? Say my composition's first chord is C major......now which chord i can use and how to find them? not only major, minor chords but all other chords like major 7th, minor 7th, 7th, etc. Is there any chart for it. can ayone give name of site that can easily teach me aboutt it.

Need help. Thanks.
#3
basic music theory. You could use A minor as that is the relative minor of C major.

You could use the primary chords from C major (so an E, for example) and then make it a 7th, (so E7th), then up to the fifth (G) and play that as major/minor/7th/whatever.

But basic music theory will help. There's good tutorials on UG.
Quote by necrosis1193
Somewhere in a concert hall in Sweden, you have just caused Yngwie Malmsteen physical pain. You also caused him to catch on fire.


Quote by frusciante.ve
I like that new song of theirs that goes all "peeeeeaaaas wiiiill comeeeeee toooo meeeee"


Just because you Seymour Duncan, doesn't mean you Seymour Dunshould
#4
There are 7 notes in a major key. Each of these corresponds to a chord diatonic to the key.
In the key of C major this would be:
CM7
Dm7
Em7
FM7
G7
Am7


I suggest you read some lessons on how to construct chords, and common progressions and cadences. www.musictheory.net is a good site you should check out.
Quote by thsrayas
Why did women get multiple orgasms instead of men? I want a river of semen flowing out of my room to mark my territory.

You can play a shoestring if you're sincere
- John Coltrane
#5
learn your basic theory, chord scales as mentioned above
but be sure to know their functions, the tonics, subdominants and dominants (using 3rd-relations)
so you understand when and why you can use what chords

analyse as much chord progressions as you can to get a feel for it

now its VERY important you also learn about leading tones in the chords so you can understand why certain cadences sound the way they do
#6
You have endless possibilities. Just because you start on a C major doesn't mean you're confined to the key of C major. As for major keys, you could be in C major, G major, or F major. As for minor keys, you could be in A minor, E minor, or D minor.

7even posted the chords in C major (or A minor, depending which you resolve to). In G major and E minor you have: G(maj7) Am(7) Bm(7) Cmaj(7) D(7) Em(7) F#ø.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#8
Quote by MacMan2001
basic music theory. You could use A minor as that is the relative minor of C major.

You could use the primary chords from C major (so an E, for example) and then make it a 7th, (so E7th), then up to the fifth (G) and play that as major/minor/7th/whatever.

But basic music theory will help. There's good tutorials on UG.


Please don't try giving advice whenever you have no idea what the hell you're talking about.
Famous last words are for men who never said enough. - Anonymous
Gear
Agile 3000 Rootbeer slim
Vox Valvetronix VT30
Takamine GS430S Acoustic
#9
The problem is...basic theory teaches you what chords to use which is very helpful. Then advanced theory tells you to do whatever you want. So remember to use your ear.
Gear:
Inflatable Guitar
Digitech GSP 2101/Mosvalve 962/Yamaha S412V
My Imagination
#10
Quote by MacMan2001
You could use the primary chords from C major (so an E, for example) and then make it a 7th, (so E7th), then up to the fifth (G) and play that as major/minor/7th/whatever.


E7 and Gm aren't even diatonic to the C major scale I'm not saying you could never ever play those chords, but it isn't really basic theory anymore...
7even gave the basic way how to harmonize the major scale.
#13
Quote by Myshadow46_2
www.ultimate-guitar.com is a pretty good site! There are plenty of lessons and columns to check out. I suggest that, to begin with, you learn how to construct the major scale. Then learn how to harmonize it in 3rds to build chords from it.
This! Learn the major scale so you understand how its constructed, then learn to harmonise it by stacking 3rds, and you'll be able to work out easily what chords will go with any given key/scale.
#14
Quote by 7even
There are 7 notes in a major key. Each of these corresponds to a chord diatonic to the key.
In the key of C major this would be:
CM7
Dm7
Em7
FM7
G7
Am7


I suggest you read some lessons on how to construct chords, and common progressions and cadences. www.musictheory.net is a good site you should check out.


This. He spelled it out for you quite nicely tbh.
Quote by acjshapiro

Quote by Vrstone87

meh, I've listened to every radiohead album and honestly don't get what everyone loves about them.....


cause you're ****ing stupid

Last edited by 3holepunch at Sep 30, 2009,