#1
By True rhythm I mean 100% rhythm that isn't based off hearing something and then playing it later. Like say I wanted to play a song I can play it but only by playing it back in my head so its 1. A little off at parts 2. When playing it live full band its off enough to really make a difference. I've been told by people you have to feel the rhythm and then I've been told by professionals that is a false statement.. That "Feeling" rhythm is keeping the beat swaying in your arm. I have a problem doing that..
Like for example this song is a very basic example. In keeping secrets of silent earth: 3 a very very easy song goes like this with arm movement.
Down, Miss, Miss, Up, Miss, Up, down, miss, miss, Up , miss, Up, down, miss, miss, up, miss, up, down, miss, down, miss, down

That kind of thing. I've been told this is the real way to keep perfect rhythm and it makes sense because if you do it correctly you can never really go off tempo and unless you make a mistake it is going to be as accurate as possible.

My problem is i do make mistakes and such so how do I build on this constant swinging motion?

Any information what so ever would be most appreciated.


EDIT: Also what is a good way to stimulate (Increase the speed of) Muscle Memorization?
Last edited by mtgold83 at Sep 28, 2009,
#2
listen to your drummer! that's what they are for. if you keep perfect rhythm and your drummer doesn't, you will be the one that sounds off. just listen to your drummer and feel the song while you play
"every prince has to slay a few dragons before he meets his princess"
#3
): that doesn't really help me.. and honestly if a drummer isnt keeping perfect rhythm or at least very near perfect he shouldn't be in a band.....
#4
Honestly, I'd say try playing the drums on rock band, or a similar game. It's easier than real drums, but it'll enhance your sense of rhythm. I could never tap my foot to the beat (I could barely find the beat) as I played before, but now it just comes naturally.

Also, forget about that down-miss-up-down-miss bullshit. That's just over-complicating a fairly simple issue. The best way to do it really is to feel the rhythm. Even if you are using that method, chances are good that each motion won't have an equal length if you can't feel the rhythm. Play the plastic drums, then listen to your drummer when gigging. It'll help, I promise.

*flame shield deployed*
Last edited by SlashYourFug at Sep 28, 2009,
#6
1. Always practice with a metronome.
2. Always tap your foot, sway your shoulders, nod your head (as many body parts as possible!) to the metronome. This helps internalize it - ie feel it instead of just hear it.
3. Make sure you have learned your material as thoroughly as possible. When you are really confident with what you are playing, this leaves more brainpower free for really locking on and getting into it. The best way to get material memorized and build up muscle memory is to spend more time practicing it slowly before you start working the tempo up.
#7
Thank you all for the input se012101 and SlashYourFug especially.
The idea of rock band drums is great. My friend just told me he has worse rhythm than i ever did and when he started playing rock band drums by the time he got up to Expert difficulty everything even leading rhythms came natural to him. So aparently you are not the only one to think that. Thanks guys. I'll go for it. And se012101 i really like the idea of using as many body parts as possible. MAkes sense.
#8
For rythm rely on your drummer. That's the main prupose of the drum, to set the rythm. Another thing that I find helpful is muscle memory. Play a song enough and your muscles in your fingers begin to 'remember'the pace of the song so that you can play it at a consistent speed. when I first played "Iron Maiden" I think I did the song in anytime between 2 minutes and 6 in the first week. After a couple more weeks though I was keeping it at about 3 and a half. So keep practising and you'll be sure to nail it perfectly in both rythm and notes.
Have a good one,
Phoenix
#9
I agree, rythm games help, and always pra tice with a metronome.
Quote by turd_ferguson
[0:17] If my parents knew I was part of a group who celebrated christmas by drinking cough syrup they would probably cry

WEATHERER, the greatest band ever.
#10
yea i mean i can hit the notes of any thing that you would consider novice level and alot of intermediate stuff its just when you wanna join a band rhythm is very important and for some reason they tell you to try out and dont have a drummer with u xD.. I need a drummer so i know when to switch parts i guess. Those fills help I must say .
#11
Slow down and use a metronome. Or, listen to the drum beat at a slow speed and gradually speed up.