#1
So I'm new to tube amps, and I was wondering, is either better sounding? Or are they the same sound?
Quote by 23:50 inbleach
can't i just eat the fucking cactus?

Quote by WildChicken
Go suck a cat westdyolf!

Quote by Cat Of Pain
So, West...

I hear you'll suck my cat...

Ill suck your cat
PEACE LOVE PANCAKES
call me zach

chocolate chip pancakes!
#2
it depends what you are playing. for metal, a 4x12 cabinet is good for the bass reponse. For rock, about the same story. But for blues, jazz, etc., it doesn't matter really.
The world doesn't revolve around you. If it does, beware. You're probably about to pass out drunk.

The 19 year old who knows his stuff. Most of the time.
#4
If you're deciding between a 2x12 combo and a half stack, get the half stack. Because tube amps are somewhat fragile, it's nice to have a ~50 pound head containing the breakable stuff and a ~100 pound cab that can take a beating, rather than a ~80+ pound beast that you still have to be nice to.
#5
depends what cab you go for with the head, as to what sound you get, or in the case of how many speakers, how spread out the sound is, giving the impression of loudness and a bassier response.
#6
A Peavey 6505 212 combo will sound the same as a 6505 head, but the major difference is in the ability to pair your head with different sounding or differently sized cabs, adding a variety of colors to your sound. For example, you can buy a Valveking 212 combo, or you can buy the Valveking head and buy a nice cab for it and sound much better than the combo, or a crap cab and sound worse than the combo.
Squier Strat (Jazz/JB) - Dunlop Zakk Wylde Crybaby - Boss MIJ HM-2 Distortion - Peavey Valveking 212 - Fender CD60
#7
Quote by westdyolf
So I'm new to tube amps, and I was wondering, is either better sounding? Or are they the same sound?

it depends

does it have the same speakers?
is it a closed back or an open back?
what amp are you talking about?
PSN USERNAME: MetuulGuitarist7
STEAM:MetuulGuitarist7
Origin:MetuulGuitarist7
feel free to add me
#8
Cuz I'm debating on buying the v22 bugera combo, or biting the bullet and saving more and gettig the v55 head and bk212 cab
Quote by 23:50 inbleach
can't i just eat the fucking cactus?

Quote by WildChicken
Go suck a cat westdyolf!

Quote by Cat Of Pain
So, West...

I hear you'll suck my cat...

Ill suck your cat
PEACE LOVE PANCAKES
call me zach

chocolate chip pancakes!
#9
Check out this thread in the Stickies:

https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=278232

Essentially, a combo is generally open-backed, which means the bass is allowed to escape and fill the room out more. While a 4x12 cabinet is normally closed-back and doesn't allow the bass to escape anywhere but forward, directly towards the audience.

Buying combos are normally cheaper.

A head and a 2x12 cabinet is easier to carry than a combo, generally.

Cabinets have the ability to be swapped easily at shows, while combos, you are stuck with the stock speaker, unless you physically remove them and replace them with different models.

A half-stack (4x12) will provide a considerably more powerful sound than a 1x12 combo. It hits you in the chest. Because there are physically more speakers, the air is pushed further forward, thus creating a more direct sound to your ears.

As said, a 4x12 is ideal for gigging rock musicians. While a 1x12 combo is ideal for home, or gigging, jazz/blues/indie musicians.
#10
The main advantage that will see me getting a head and cab separate in future is that you don't get issues with tube rattle and mechanical noise the same way you do with a combo.
#11
generally they are going to be extremely similar, so neither is really better. other than the closed back cab vs. open back combo issue (and some cabs are open back), the difference in sound is going to be minimal. combos are usually cheaper though. however, sometimes there are differences between the head and combo version that makes one better than the other (or at least better for certain uses).

for me though, the biggest reason to use a head is interchangability. you can stick a head on a 4x12 for your gigs and a 1x12 for your practicing. the volume wont be hugely different because of the speakers, but it will sound fuller with the bigger cab. you can also mix and match speakers more easily when switching cabs. you can also leave a cab in multiple places (home, drummers place, band room, etc.) and only cart the head around.

then with combos it is more compact and youve only got one thing to carry/worry about. you can replace 1 speaker with a better one more easily/cheaply than 4.

so basicly sometimes a head/cab is better, sometimes a combo is better. it really depends on the situation.
#12
I have a combo. I'm hoping to trade it for a head. Solely for the reason that jof mentioned. If you are going to be moving your amp around, get a head and leave cabs in multiple places...if you have the money to do that.
My Gear:
Guitars:
Paul Reed Smith Custom 24 in Charcoal Burst

Amps:
ENGL Powerball I V2

Pedals:
Ibanez Jemini
Vintage '70s Thomas Organ Crybaby Wah
Boss DD-6