#1
Well I am a complete r-tard and I had wrote down some information but I was not very clear. Now I am stuck with fragments I am confused on. If you could clear this up for me as simply as possible, I would appreciate it.

I wrote down Pentatonic Scale and then the intervals in it, M2 m3 M2 M2 and then I put a 1 next to it. Below that I put another Pentatonic Scale which is M2 M2 m3 M2 and I put a 2 next to it. Obviously you all do not know what I was thinking then, I do not even have a clue, but most of you know more than I and can explain my problem.
What I was thinking is there is two Pentatonic scales, you play one when ascending and the other when descending, like the Melodic Scale, you play the Natural Minor scale when descending amirite?

Another was; a diminished chord is where the third and fifth are flat, amirite? What is it when the fifth is flattened but the third is still a M3 apart from the Root.

Thanks in advance, yet again.
#2
Quote by Pipwud
Well I am a complete r-tard and I had wrote down some information but I was not very clear. Now I am stuck with fragments I am confused on. If you could clear this up for me as simply as possible, I would appreciate it.

I wrote down Pentatonic Scale and then the intervals in it, M2 m3 M2 M2 and then I put a 1 next to it. Below that I put another Pentatonic Scale which is M2 M2 m3 M2 and I put a 2 next to it. Obviously you all do not know what I was thinking then, I do not even have a clue, but most of you know more than I and can explain my problem.
What I was thinking is there is two Pentatonic scales, you play one when ascending and the other when descending, like the Melodic Scale, you play the Natural Minor scale when descending amirite?

Another was; a diminished chord is where the third and fifth are flat, amirite? What is it when the fifth is flattened but the third is still a M3 apart from the Root.

Thanks in advance, yet again.


Your right about playing the melodic minor scale one way ascending, and as natural minor descending, but there is only one way to play the pentatonic minor scale.

As for that chord your talking about, its an inversion of a half diminished chord with some notes missing.

So you have say C E Gb

Rearrange them to get Gb C E. But since the E of the scale is acting as a 6th, and the not is acting as a 7, you have to change the E to its enharmonic equivalent of Fb

So now you have Gb C Fb

Fill in the missing third Gb Bbb C Fb

And theres your half diminished chord
Last edited by tubatom868686 at Sep 28, 2009,
#3
Remember that all chords are just stacked Maj or Min thirds and nothing else(in western harmony, hence tertian harmony)

Remember that the idea of b3, b5 are talking about what notes you need to change from the major scale. Don't confuse them with intervals such as Min 3rd and Diminished 5th.

Just thought you *might* be doing that...so don't be offended.
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#4
Looks to me like you've written down the patterns the pentatonic scale makes in different positions (ie starting on different notes from the scale). The Major Pentatonic is just the Major scale with the 4th and 7th omitted, and the minor pentatonic is just the minor scale with the 2nd and 6th omitted, and you can play them anywhere on the neck you can find the notes.

The 'patterns' you've probably been shown are what you get when you play the scale 2nps starting on each note of the scale - generally the pattern you get starting on the root of the minor pent its called 1st position of the minor pent, form the 2nd notes is called 2nd position of the minor pent (this is also 1st position of the major pent) - but don't get too tempted to just memorise the patterns. You're better off learning the scale in terms of notes and intervals AND knowing the patterns they make - makes it much easier to use than just knowing patterns.

Your basic chords are formed by stacking 3rds. So if you form a C Major chord you're stacking 3rds from the C Major scale - C D E F G A B, that is the root (C), 3rd above the root (which is E, the 3rd of the scale), and a 3rd above that (which is G, the 5th of the scale). That gives you a Major chord because their is a Major 3rd between the Root and the 3rd, and a minor 3rd between the 3rd and the 5th.

A Major chord is a Maj 3rd with a min 3rd on top (eg C E G)
A minor chord is a min 3rd with a Maj 3rd on top (eg C Eb G)
A diminished chord is stacked minor 3rds - so a min 3rd with a min 3rd on top (eg C Eb Gb)
#5
Quote by zhilla
A Major 7th chord is Maj 3rd, min 3rd, Maj 3 (eg C E G B)
A minor 7th chord is min 3rd, Maj 3rd, min 3rd (eg C Eb G Bb)
A diminished (7th) chord is stacked minor 3rds - so min 3rd, min 3rd, min 3rd on top (eg C Eb Gb Bbb)
Extended.

I felt it was important to point out the importance of how the diminished chord is comprised completely of minor thirds (including from the 7th to the tonic. Although it is technically an augmented second, the intervals are enharmonic, if intervals can be considered enharmonic), and how not only triads, but extension chords (all the way up to 13ths) consist of major and minor thirds. A major 13 looks like this: M3 m3 M3 m3 m3 M3. A major 13(#11) has a more metric composition (altering major and minor thirds): M3 m3 M3 m3 M3 m3.

Just a bit of information about these chords which have certain patterns of intervals, because I personally think they sound awesome.

Oh, also, augmented chords consist of three major thirds (well, two if you don't count the 5th to the tonic).

Ok, I'm done now.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#6
Quote by zhilla
Looks to me like you've written down the patterns the pentatonic scale makes in different positions (ie starting on different notes from the scale). The Major Pentatonic is just the Major scale with the 4th and 7th omitted, and the minor pentatonic is just the minor scale with the 2nd and 6th omitted, and you can play them anywhere on the neck you can find the notes.

The 'patterns' you've probably been shown are what you get when you play the scale 2nps starting on each note of the scale - generally the pattern you get starting on the root of the minor pent its called 1st position of the minor pent, form the 2nd notes is called 2nd position of the minor pent (this is also 1st position of the major pent) - but don't get too tempted to just memorise the patterns. You're better off learning the scale in terms of notes and intervals AND knowing the patterns they make - makes it much easier to use than just knowing patterns.

Your basic chords are formed by stacking 3rds. So if you form a C Major chord you're stacking 3rds from the C Major scale - C D E F G A B, that is the root (C), 3rd above the root (which is E, the 3rd of the scale), and a 3rd above that (which is G, the 5th of the scale). That gives you a Major chord because their is a Major 3rd between the Root and the 3rd, and a minor 3rd between the 3rd and the 5th.

A Major chord is a Maj 3rd with a min 3rd on top (eg C E G)
A minor chord is a min 3rd with a Maj 3rd on top (eg C Eb G)
A diminished chord is stacked minor 3rds - so a min 3rd with a min 3rd on top (eg C Eb Gb)



i fareted. I thank you for the knowledge. A majority of it was information I had already done learneded but I got some little bits and giblets from that.
#7
Quote by tubatom868686

So you have say C E Gb

Rearrange them to get Gb C E. But since the E of the scale is acting as a 6th, and the not is acting as a 7, you have to change the E to its enharmonic equivalent of Fb

So now you have Gb C Fb

Fill in the missing third Gb Bbb C Fb

And theres your half diminished chord


Too complicated man. I think he meant that the root stays the same, so the name would be Cmajb5.