#1
Alright, so last night I witnessed three 9-volt batteries go dead on me from three different guitar pedals. Rather than go out and buy a bunch of new batteries, I decided to just take the extra step and buy a 1-spot adapter/daisy chain combo. Now that I'm getting ready to set it up though, a whole bunch of questions keep coming to me, and I'm terrified of frying all my pedals by making a stupid mistake, so I decided to come on here and ask them before I make an expensive error.

(I did search for another topic with similar concerns, but I kept finding so many unrelated daisy chain/power supply topics that I eventually gave up. Most of these questions are probably embarrassingly obviously, but like I said, I wanted to check before I did something stupid.)

- First, when I run the 1-spot, can I leave the 9-volt batteries in the effects, or will that overload the pedals? And if I have to remove the batteries first, should I cover the battery clip with electrical tape so that the metal tips don't touch the metal pedalcase? Or will the 1-spot keep electricity from even running to the battery clip?

- Second, the 1-stop supplies 1700 mA of current... now it's been a while since I've taken physics, so I don't remember too much about electricity, but if voltage is held constant in a circuit between objects it's powering, then current must diminish, right? So in other words, if I plug the 1-stop into a pedal that draws 100 mA of current, it will only have 1600 mA left to supply to the rest? I'm asking this because I have a Digitech Harmonyman, which runs off of 9-volts, but draws 1300 mA of current. If the total current decreases which each successive pedal, then I won't be able to safely run the Harmonyman with my other effects.

- I notice that the tips on the daisy chain are slightly bigger then the input on each pedal, so a tiny bit of metal sticks out. Is this a fire hazard? Will it create noise? If yes to either of those, is there anything I can do to fix this?

- Lastly, in my signature is a list of all the pedals I use (at least, I think that's all of them...). I believe they're all positive-outer, negative-inner, and I've checked most of them with the 1-spot's list of compatible adapters, but if anyone knows if one of them is incompatible and I'm about to make a mistake, please let me know. I plan on testing each pedal individually with the chain before plugging them all in, so there shouldn't be any risk of frying them all, but I am a little worried that I misread something and I'll end up breaking one of them...

Any information anyone has on those questions, electronics, daisy chains, and the 1-spot in general would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!
Gear:
Gibson Les Paul Studio (Wine Red/Gold Pickups)
Vox Wah
Pigtronix Philosopher's Tone
Boss DS-1
Digitech HarmonyMan
EHX Small Stone Phase Shifter
Digitech TimeBender
Boss RC-2
Fender Blues Jr. (Brown/Tan)
Last edited by 12SilverStrings at Sep 28, 2009,
#2
Yes, you can leave the batteries in your pedals.

Yes 1700mA - 100mA pedal will leave you roughly 1600mA if it was the only pedal on for example.

Generally, it is recommended that multi-effects pedals and pedals that suck a lot of juice should just run on their own dedicated adapter.

Can't speak to all of your pedals but it looks like you are doing your research. I'd probably try to run the Harmonizer and RP unit on their dedicated adapters.

Also, try not to let any spare non-connected 1spot plugs touch other cables or pedals or such, could cause unwanted noise.

Can't speak to fire hazards, just use common sense. Don't roll the rest of the cable up with a pile of rags kinda thing.

I own a OneSpot daisy chain - works great.

Good luck.
Last edited by 311ZOSOVHJH at Sep 28, 2009,
#3
Awesome, thanks. That was a big help. I'll leave the Harmonizer and multi-effects off the daisy chain and just use their own specific adapters. Alright, thanks again.
Gear:
Gibson Les Paul Studio (Wine Red/Gold Pickups)
Vox Wah
Pigtronix Philosopher's Tone
Boss DS-1
Digitech HarmonyMan
EHX Small Stone Phase Shifter
Digitech TimeBender
Boss RC-2
Fender Blues Jr. (Brown/Tan)
#4
Quote by 311ZOSOVHJH
Yes, you can leave the batteries in your pedals.
Generally, it is recommended that multi-effects pedals and pedals that suck a lot of juice should just run on their own dedicated adapter.



This.
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