#1
Hey guys, I have a question maybe you guys can help me with. Right now I listen to a wide range of genres, but mostly metal. On guitar I can mianly only play thrash. Even though I haven't been playing for the longest time (2 years), I would really love to start exploring more genres than the metal ones I currently play. So I was wondering if there was any place that would give a very in depth look at the fundementals of a genre and then a more in depth look for more advanced players (for when I get the fundementals down. Not saying I will get them right away, just want to have the links ready). I will list some genres I would REALLY love to learn and you guys could post whatever other genres you think:

Progressive Metal/Rock
Technical Metal/Math Rock/Mathcore (Not sure on the proper term)
Jazz/Jazz Fusion
Hard Rock
Classical Rock
Death Metal
Punk Rock (And all sub genres)
Power Metal

And a bunch of others, but still, you can post what isn't here, I'm open to any and all genres. I would like to experiment with different sounds.

Also, while I'm at it, do you guys know of any good sites that could teach rhythem guitar? I'm really interested in becoming a greta rhythem guitarist.

Thank you soooo much!
#4
No,

When you transcribe music (at least how I do) you are listening and notating not only the correct rhythms and pitches but to every little detail in their playing. Listen to the width and speed of their vibrato, where they are playing in the beat (phrasing), maybe watching videos to watch their left and right hand technique, etc.

So after a while you have the techniques of the soloist mastered and can sound nearly identical to the original. Now comes the analyzing part which is how you will get to incoorperate what you have learned into your own playing and form new ideas instead of just playing licks over and over.

This is what separates the players from the musicians in my opinion. It is really almost impossible to analyze from tab so reading and writing notation is a must. So transcribe one of those solos out and you can start to piece each section together figuring out why it works.

Analyze one measure at a time first, figuring out how the notes relate to the chord. Then, you can take it a step further and analyze how the chord fit together and work in the progression.


Keep in mind this takes lots of effort and practice but if you put in the work you will stand out from all the other players
#7
Are there any programs like the program "Transcribe!" mentioned in the article, but free?
#8
Quote by RHunterGN
Are there any programs like the program "Transcribe!" mentioned in the article, but free?


Ha man, you've got to do it yourself. Read what Rockinrider55 wrote again. Having a computer do it for you is the same as just looking at a tab. You've got to use your OWN ear to better yourself. Which means listening to the song with YOUR ear and not a computer's.
Quote by Seryaph
You need to douse it in a 20/30/50 ratio of mustard/ketchup/horseradish and stroke it as fast as you can untill the mayonaise squirts out. Then consume.
#9
Quote by hothead69999
Ha man, you've got to do it yourself. Read what Rockinrider55 wrote again. Having a computer do it for you is the same as just looking at a tab. You've got to use your OWN ear to better yourself. Which means listening to the song with YOUR ear and not a computer's.
No man, transcribe is a program that slows down and loops patterns you're trying to transcribe. Good tool if you ask me
#10
Haha oops my bad. Well, in that case, there's also one out there called Guitar Trainer or something like that. I know it was freeware somewhere, and I had it on my old computer. Worked like a charm with slowing stuff down.
Quote by Seryaph
You need to douse it in a 20/30/50 ratio of mustard/ketchup/horseradish and stroke it as fast as you can untill the mayonaise squirts out. Then consume.
#11
So are there any free programs that can slow down, loop and remove vocals?