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#161
Quote by Blind In 1 Ear
do you know what notes you can sing? get out your guitar and tell us what strings and frets you can sing, highest and lowest. that would get you a better answer

based on what you said, id say baritone.



My comfortable range would be C on the A string to D on B string. My voice breaks at around A on the G string. I read that baritone is the most common voice. If that is what I am ,then I should be able to sing most radio songs.
#162
Quote by veggielover
My comfortable range would be C on the A string to D on B string. My voice breaks at around A on the G string. I read that baritone is the most common voice. If that is what I am ,then I should be able to sing most radio songs.

not necessarily. there are a good amount of tenors in popular music as well as baritones who have worked hard at stretching their range. for someone who is a baritone who doesnt have a lot of singing experience, a lot of songs might seem out of their range.

C to A sounds like tenor range. its pretty common for untrained singers to top out at the A. with practice you could get closer to the C5.
#163
Quote by veggielover
My comfortable range would be C on the A string to D on B string. My voice breaks at around A on the G string. I read that baritone is the most common voice. If that is what I am ,then I should be able to sing most radio songs.


That's weird though, if that is your range you shouldn't be having problems with any male pop songs
are you sure you're not off by an octave?

edit:ignore me, I'm stupid
I'm the one who's off by an octave here, oops
Last edited by Cheeseman07 at Jan 21, 2010,
#164
Wait a sec.... careful here....

Your range, as you have stated is from the C representing the lowest tenor note, but only goes up ONE octave plus a note. Yes, with that, you WILL have difficulty singing many of the songs on the radio.

At this point, your range is entirely incomplete. You should have at least pretty close to two octaves. If you don't, it just means that you don't *now.* It just means that you need to develop that range. You may find that your range extends downward another whole octave, which would actually make you a bass. This is your least likely bet. Equally unlikely is that you'll find that your range will extend up another whole octave (or pretty close), which would make you a tenor.

The most likely is that you will add a few notes on the bottom and a few on the top, which will eventually make you a baritone. However, you lack the range that a baritone singer needs to have.

Get some lessons and learn how to produce the voice properly and efficiently. Your range WILL improve. Given that you're only working with one octave, you will find that your range will increase by a LOT.

Right now, your limitation isn't your voice. Your limitation is not knowing how to produce the voice.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#165
I can sing the deep C but my voice gets a little irritated and I can reach the Ab under the high C. It's a pretty good range I guess...
#166
^you're probably either using vocal fry on your bottom end or falsetto on your top
unless you're already well trained and that's your natural range, if that's the case well done
#167
Quote by Cheeseman07
^you're probably either using vocal fry on your bottom end or falsetto on your top
unless you're already well trained and that's your natural range, if that's the case well done


Well, I know when I hit the Ab it's not falsetto but maybe you're right about the bottom. Because when I get any lower than Eb it feels like I'm doing a weird thing in my throat. Kinda like the feeling as when I'm screaming, but I don't know which technique I use for screams... And if that has anything to do with my singing.
#168
Quote by Gumle
Well, I know when I hit the Ab it's not falsetto but maybe you're right about the bottom. Because when I get any lower than Eb it feels like I'm doing a weird thing in my throat. Kinda like the feeling as when I'm screaming, but I don't know which technique I use for screams... And if that has anything to do with my singing.


That would probably be vocal fry.
#169
Ok, since it's obvious that 4 octave ranges is basically bullshit, is there any singer (famous or not, doesn't matter) you guys know that even has 3? Because even that is a remarkable achievement.

j/w
#171
Quote by beadhangingOne
Ok, since it's obvious that 4 octave ranges is basically bullshit, is there any singer (famous or not, doesn't matter) you guys know that even has 3? Because even that is a remarkable achievement.

j/w

There are a lot of famous singers that have three. I don't know them personally, but they're famous for a reason.
#172
Quote by Blind In 1 Ear
ok i have to ask this. i think i have before but i dont remember getting an answer. why isnt falsetto considered part of your range? its still notes you can hit right? and if you can blend it well it sounds pretty natural.


That's just how people have chosen to measure range. Its just like how stringed instruments' range do not include harmonics, even though we can play them, and they can sometimes sound pretty much like the regular notes.
#173
Quote by iforgot120
There are a lot of famous singers that have three. I don't know them personally, but they're famous for a reason.


They're SO famous, in fact, that we don't even know who they are!

But seriously.... I can't think of anyone with that kind of range, off-hand.

Famous doesn't necessarily mean technically gifted. Bob Dylan is a famous singer.

@isaac ^ - excellent answer. Just to take it one step further, though, the original question included a qualifier: 'IF they can blend their falsetto well.' In circumstances where singers are hired to perform a certain role, there is no room for IFs. Sure, I *could* hire a baritone, and he *might* be able to blend his falsetto well enough to hit a pleasing B natural as called for in the repertoire. However, if I hire a tenor, I *know* he can hit a pleasing B natural.

Or another way of looking at it.... I *could* use a hammer to drive a screw in, and if I'm careful, I possibly won't even damage anything, but if my requirement is to drive screws, why wouldn't I just use a screwdriver?

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#174
Quote by axemanchris
They're SO famous, in fact, that we don't even know who they are!

But seriously.... I can't think of anyone with that kind of range, off-hand.

Famous doesn't necessarily mean technically gifted. Bob Dylan is a famous singer.

@isaac ^ - excellent answer. Just to take it one step further, though, the original question included a qualifier: 'IF they can blend their falsetto well.' In circumstances where singers are hired to perform a certain role, there is no room for IFs. Sure, I *could* hire a baritone, and he *might* be able to blend his falsetto well enough to hit a pleasing B natural as called for in the repertoire. However, if I hire a tenor, I *know* he can hit a pleasing B natural.

Or another way of looking at it.... I *could* use a hammer to drive a screw in, and if I'm careful, I possibly won't even damage anything, but if my requirement is to drive screws, why wouldn't I just use a screwdriver?

CT

yeah but even in that situation the tenor might not be able to hit a good B either. you dont really "know" that. although its safer to assume he could over the baritone.

i guess if we are talking in more classical terms, i agree. but in blues and rock or metal its pretty common to belt out what should be falsetto, even if its a little raspy.
#175
Quote by axemanchris
They're SO famous, in fact, that we don't even know who they are!

But seriously.... I can't think of anyone with that kind of range, off-hand.

Famous doesn't necessarily mean technically gifted. Bob Dylan is a famous singer.


Yeah, I just specified famous or not, so people wouldn't simply name the famous ones. After doing some research, Jeff Buckley, Freddie Mercury, Robert Plant, Bruce Dickinson and a couple others *might* have 3 octaves. However, this is only if you consider the lowest/highest notes they've hit over the course of their career. I don't know that they could pull all those notes off on the same day. So yeah, only with the least stringent definition of range, do a handful of singers have 3 octaves. Actually, then again, my sister, who sings opera and other stuff does have 3, I legitimately checked it.
Last edited by beadhangingOne at Jan 27, 2010,
#176
I know Jeff Buckley comfortably utilized 3 octaves in a ton of gigs. He's probably gone lower, but I've heard him reach G2s for "Dream Brother" and he was hitting full G5s and A5s quite regularly.
#177
Quote by Acoustic#3
I know Jeff Buckley comfortably utilized 3 octaves in a ton of gigs. He's probably gone lower, but I've heard him reach G2s for "Dream Brother" and he was hitting full G5s and A5s quite regularly.


yessss, also Cedric Bixler-Zavala from The Mars Volta can go from Bb2 up to C6 in a mixed voice, he can prob go a couple semi-tones lower too.
but I'm sure someone's gonna come in here and say it's all falsetto (it's not)

Dan Nigro from As Tall As Lions might come close too, depending on how much of his upper register you count. He can def hit VERY solid high Eb's and a few thinner F#/G's. I haven't heard him sing below the low Bb/A or so, but his speaking voice doesn't seem too high so I'd imagine he has a few more at the bottom.
#179
Quote by Blind In 1 Ear
yeah but even in that situation the tenor might not be able to hit a good B either. you dont really "know" that. although its safer to assume he could over the baritone..


Sure you do. That's why he's a tenor. That's like saying that the bicycle might not have two wheels. You don't really know that, although it's safer to assume it does over a tricycle.

Well... a tricycle is a tricycle, and a bicycle is a bicycle. Of course it has two wheels.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#180
Quote by Cheeseman07
yessss, also Cedric Bixler-Zavala from The Mars Volta can go from Bb2 up to C6 in a mixed voice, he can prob go a couple semi-tones lower too.
but I'm sure someone's gonna come in here and say it's all falsetto (it's not)


Proof?

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#181
Quote by FastNeck
i got from B to G1 on this piano scale http://www.music.vt.edu/musicdictionary/appendix/pitch/pitch.html
what would that make me?


Would that be the B on the second fret fifth string to the G third fret first string on the guitar?

If so, that would be baritone, though a bit lacking in the bottom end. You may find that as your range expands that it will go up, maybe from B to B, which would make you pretty much a tenor. You might find that it goes down, so you have from G to G, which would make you a textbook baritone. You may find that it goes a little in each direction, say, from A to A, which would basically make you a baritone.

For that reason, I'm always a little reluctant to define anyone's vocal classification without that person having established a full two octaves.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#182
With just chest voice, I can go from deep E to B above middle C.

Including falsetto, I can go from deep E to two E's above middle C.

Would that just be an extensive baritone?
#184
Quote by VideosirensCG
With just chest voice, I can go from deep E to B above middle C.

Including falsetto, I can go from deep E to two E's above middle C.

Would that just be an extensive baritone?


you silly goose, you're including vocal fry.
or do you mean the low E, the one an octave and a half below middle C?
If that's it, maybe a high baritone, but it's hard to tell without hearing the low and high notes.

BTW has anyone else noticed that with just about every singer, basses can sing in falsetto up to about the high C, baritones the high E, and tenors the high A? There's a few extra notes up there for the really skilled singers, but for most people it seems to always be one of the three.
#185
Quote by Cheeseman07
you silly goose, you're including vocal fry.
or do you mean the low E, the one an octave and a half below middle C?


I'm not including the "vocal fry" section of my voice (which would I guess go down to deep C but the pitch is incomprehensive) and by deep E, I mean the second lowest E on the piano. I know it sounds hard to believe regarding my higher register, but I am a Bass 2 in my high school choir.

I would post some sort of audio reference to my range, but I just woke up, so my voice is shot.
#186
Hey Guys
Using Lip Roll Exercises on SS, I can get from about a low Bb/B to recently an A above male high C to a female high C
But just regular singing I'd say about C below middle C sometimes a B if I'm pushing it to a G above male high C
So I was wondering what range is that?

Also if you guys could help me out with something for the last two days my mixed voice has been sounding sort of squeeky gravely instead of the smooth tone .. Is this just it being overworked or a bad vocal day?
#189
WyvernOmega, your singer sounds like a standard(if there is such a thing) Baritone to me. When you say his range is from D2-E4 do you mean that's the range he actually sings in? Because you can SING notes that aren't necessarily usable. Speaking from personal experience I can force my voice down to about a G2, but I can't actually USE any notes till about a D3 with good quality. So I can sing baritone notes but that doesn't mean I'd call myself a baritone, dunno if that makes sense?
#190
Quote by stusa05
WyvernOmega, your singer sounds like a standard(if there is such a thing) Baritone to me. When you say his range is from D2-E4 do you mean that's the range he actually sings in? Because you can SING notes that aren't necessarily usable. Speaking from personal experience I can force my voice down to about a G2, but I can't actually USE any notes till about a D3 with good quality. So I can sing baritone notes but that doesn't mean I'd call myself a baritone, dunno if that makes sense?

Yeah, I guess D2 is a bit of a stretch for him, usable, I'd round it do the 2 octaves. He has a damn solid low range, but he sings Muse so it isn't worth shit

I write songs.
YOU SHOULD LISTEN TO THEM
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#191
Just tested my vocal range using power tab. I can hit everything from C#2 to F5 pretty well. The topmost and bottommost notes are the only true bad ones.

Not bad for a guitarist, eh?
#193
The lowest note on a piano is the 1, right? So, the lowest G would be G1, correct?

If so, I'm G2 to G5. Is this a bad range? I've noticed there doesn't seem to be too much I can sing.
#194
^that's actually a pretty good range, I'm guessing the top is with falsetto but still
what's probably going on is your full voice doesn't have much range so you still need to develop that.
#195
im not sure if im doing it wrong, but when im trying to gauge where my vocal range can start..

as a quick test i tried just my open low E and F and i couldn't even tell if i was higher or lower.

i can hear the difference between strings when i tune a open string to the 5th fret(that out of synch/out of tune noise) but i can't hear it in a vocal test.

have to find something else to match lol
#196
I tried looking around the internet on how the notes are found on guitar, so I'm sorry if I am using the wrong notes to describe something.

I'm not sure what the open 6th string would be called, but I can hit that pretty easily. I can also hit a B5(I think, that would be B on the 1st string, right?) and I slightly go into falsetto to hit the C. I could probably get the note if I worked on it for alittle while longer.

Is there a vocal type that describes this range? Thanks for the help.
#197
Quote by Mattofla
I tried looking around the internet on how the notes are found on guitar, so I'm sorry if I am using the wrong notes to describe something.

I'm not sure what the open 6th string would be called, but I can hit that pretty easily. I can also hit a B5(I think, that would be B on the 1st string, right?) and I slightly go into falsetto to hit the C. I could probably get the note if I worked on it for alittle while longer.

Is there a vocal type that describes this range? Thanks for the help.


the B on the first string (seventh fret) is B4. the open sixth string is an E2.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#198
Oh, just remembered that the number goes up with every c.

So, e2 to b4 would be a 2.5 or so octave range, if I'm looking at it correctly.
#199
Okay here's a dumb question; I'm 14 and can't sing higher than the D above middle C, is that bad?
#200
^that's pretty normal, especially if you're a new singer
I couldn't even hit a G BELOW middle C when I started and I've got a pretty high voice, it'll come with training.