#1
Hey Guys,
I'm a long time user of GarageBand and consider it an amazing resource for all musicians. I am most definitely on a budget and have been for some year, so GB is a nice alternative to programs with better features like Logic and ProTools. As an avid user of GarageBand, like many here, I am very familiar with a lot of the loops that come stock with the program. I felt it necessary to make it known the misuse of GarageBand that has been going on lately. My editorial is about big companies and products that use GarageBand loops in their commercials with little to no alteration of the loops. I know this is perfectly legal, given Apple's terms of use. However, I don't think it is right. Please give it a read and let me know what you guys thing. There's a few laughs in there and you might learn a thing or two. Cheers!

The New Auto-Tune: Apple Loops - http://wickedgoodscene.com/?p=1297
the cuervo gold / the fine columbian / make tonight a wonderful thing
#3
Absolutely man, I agree entirely. It doesn't take much to take what GarageBand gives you, in terms of loops or in terms of presets, and make something totally original out of it. I'm still stuck with musical typing via my laptop, but even that helps. Thanks for checking out my article.
the cuervo gold / the fine columbian / make tonight a wonderful thing
#4
Yeah I'm in the same situation with my iMac haha, but I've used keyboards before and they open up a whole new world of possibilities! Especially for someone who knows the in's and out's of GB pretty well, which I'm sure you do. I recommend looking into it, you should check craigslist or something, you could probably find something pretty cheap. I'm definitely getting one once I get a job...
#5
have you guys noticed any GB loops in commercials, too?
the cuervo gold / the fine columbian / make tonight a wonderful thing
#6
Hate to break this to you, but this is standard practice for the broadcast industry.
pre-fab loops and samples have been used for commercials and other assorted multi-media endeavours for a long time. you've just noticed it because it's Garageband that's in question here.

this goes way back to the reels of standard sound effects used throughout the whole history of film and television.

intesesting truefact: there is only one species of frog in the world that makes the "Ribbit" noise, all others have varied and distincivly different sounds, so why is it that everyone in the western world thinks that frogs go "ribbit"?

because in the early days of film, engineers in Hollywood set out to make standard reels of sound effects, everthing from doors slamming to alarms to the sound of keys being left down on a table. and guess where the "Ribbit" frog lives? thats right... the area around Hollywood.

That "Ribbit" sound has been used and "misused" in thousands of films and tv shows by now, just the same as later on it has become standard practice to use pre-fab music loops in the same way.

ultimatly, the world of broadcast doesn't give a half **** about originality.
Last edited by TheDriller at Sep 30, 2009,
#7
I still notice tons of sounds from the video game starcraft...on TV. All kinds of swooshes and clicks and clacks on graphics and effects. I always wonder if they have to pay royalties to Blizzard for those.
#8
Quote by Commodor 64
I still notice tons of sounds from the video game starcraft...on TV. All kinds of swooshes and clicks and clacks on graphics and effects. I always wonder if they have to pay royalties to Blizzard for those.


As per my post above, there is a good chance that these sounds are actually from a sound library of some sort, and that both Blizzard and a load of advertising companies ended up using them.

next time any of you guys are watching tv or a film, keep an ear out for some of the "standard" sounds, like the standard duck quack sound, and the sample that always seems to be used for metal doors. its fun listening out for these things, and you'll be amazed at how many you can spot.
#9
Wow Driller, that was some informative stuff! I see what you mean. I know hearing the Wilhelm Scream in shows and movies always makes me smile hehe.

You make a really good point. For some reason, though, using stock music loops seems to be on a much lower level to me than utilizing all the sound libraries for SFX out there. Maybe it's because I come from a musician's perspective, as we all do here at UG.

Thanks for the food for thought. =)
the cuervo gold / the fine columbian / make tonight a wonderful thing
#10
Quote by CerpinTaxt
Wow Driller, that was some informative stuff! I see what you mean. I know hearing the Wilhelm Scream in shows and movies always makes me smile hehe.

You make a really good point. For some reason, though, using stock music loops seems to be on a much lower level to me than utilizing all the sound libraries for SFX out there. Maybe it's because I come from a musician's perspective, as we all do here at UG.

Thanks for the food for thought. =)


indeed, i know it seems a bit weird that people would use the garageband stock loops for broadcast, but think of it theis way:

composer dude comes in the door of his studio with his brand new macbook, behind him is a shelf full of sample library disks, (as well as the boxes of his bad-ass software), the bread and butter of his work life.

so he fires up the new mac and has a quick poke around the apps, and notices that there is a new version of garageband on there that he doesn't have on his ageing G4 machine. he spots some nice loops in there, leans back in his chair and smiles

he's just got another few Gbs of loops to use in his work.
#11
thedriller's pretty on it. it's been done over and over again for decades, and will continue to be done over and over again. the only reason it's sticking out to you is because you're a musician who uses/has access to garageband.

that isn't to say that sample libraries are all that's used (they aren't) but it's a time and money saving alternative. in broadcast, sound engineers get the shaft. you have no budget and no time to do a lot of work. and say the director decides to add in a shot of a helicopter, or one more shot of a cheering crowd. you probably won't have the time or money to organize either in a day, so what do you do: you use sound libraries (preferably stuff you've accumulated from previous projects).
#12
Can't they be original and make their own sound effects. like playing around with a mic and ...random stuff
#13
Quote by GisleAune
Can't they be original and make their own sound effects. like playing around with a mic and ...random stuff


try to make commercial-quality (good enough to be in a movie or on tv) sounds of a fleet of jet planes; first, starting their engines, then of them taking off, then a pan of them flying left to right, then one of them flying at and past you, then one from the inside of the cockpit, then one of them landing. then sync them to picture and mix. see if you can do that by playing around with a mic.

and remember: every minute longer you take is money you're not getting.
#14
Quote by climhazzard
try to make commercial-quality (good enough to be in a movie or on tv) sounds of a fleet of jet planes; first, starting their engines, then of them taking off, then a pan of them flying left to right, then one of them flying at and past you, then one from the inside of the cockpit, then one of them landing. then sync them to picture and mix. see if you can do that by playing around with a mic.

and remember: every minute longer you take is money you're not getting.


Good point there, it's not illegal if the sound-FX are free or they paid a licesence or something for it.
#15
Quote by GisleAune
Can't they be original and make their own sound effects. like playing around with a mic and ...random stuff


Time=Money

you've got to remember that for many sound engineers, the creative side of the work is secondary to the necessity to feed their kids.

As has been said before, try sorting out a recording session to make a 3 second clip of a helicopter, there is a lot of work there, now try doing the same in a 25 minute timeframe (i.e. the kind of time frame you may be expected to turn over such work in the real world), can't be done can it? so you go for the "Helicopter" section of the BBC sound library disc Vol.56 .

I think its important to state that the real world of Audio goes far beyond musicians messing around with mics on the weekends. professional jobs demand professional solutions inside professional time-frames.
#16
So it's kinda official stuff, TS + 1st poster made it sound like they are ripping off films and garagebands.
#17
Quote by GisleAune
So it's kinda official stuff, TS + 1st poster made it sound like they are ripping off films and garagebands.


Ya, its all above board, and as i stated, it's been standard practice for a long time.

I think TS just found it unusual that the Garageband loops were being used.