#1
This forum seems the best place for me to ask this, i didn't get the greatest response in the gear forum.

I play mainly electric guitar and am learning to play/sing at the same time.
I want to have a mic setup, so i can sing along when playing through my amp.
My amp is a Line 6 Flextone, it doesn't have a line in socket, so i was wondering how i could go about rigging a mic up.

- What type of mic do i need? this is a small room, so i may suffer feedback issues. I see a wide range of mics on ebay.
- I have a small mixer deck, so can i just feed the output from there into some type of stereo?
- Is there any way i can play and sing through the amp?


Hopefully i can also pick up singing tips here too!

Thanks!
#2
If you're just learning to sing/practicing why would you need to sing through the amp? I mean if you can't hear yourself, turn down the volume on the amp and sing on your own. I'd say check amplification possibilities when you need to hear yourself over a whole band/when gigging.
#4
Yo Branny,

I'd suggest you get a small speaker for vocals, rather then using yoru guitar amp as yoru vocal monitor. Trust me, it's worth the investment. It doesn't have to be big. I have a smaal one from BEE SPEAKER SYSTEMS. I use it al stiny PA for keyboards and vocals.

Found it: LINKAGE

I've used it as PA for band rehearsals on an attic an dI was audible, so its got enough power to rise above your guitar amp.
#5
Try to pick up a used keyboard amp with an XLR input.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#7
The 'industry standard' for live vocals is the Shure SM58. However, that is not to say it is the best sounding mic. It is the industry standard because they are found virtually everywhere because they are cheap, reliable, and sound okay enough. Everyone has used one, so it serves as an excellent universal point of reference.

For me, personally, I love my Sennheiser e835. Back-to-back with an SM58, it makes the 58 sound like singing through wet moving blankets.

If you play guitar and sing, the 835 isn't so directional that your voice fades out if you go slightly off-axis. The e845 is more directional, which suits a person who only sings much better.

The more directional the mic, the more resistant it is to feeding back, but the tradeoff is that you have to be really precise about singing right into it. When you're not actually holding the mic, you can't be that precise. That makes the 835 an excellent compromise. It's also about the same price as the SM58.

Caution, though.... different mics sound better on different instruments and on different voices. I recorded a singer and, after going through a couple of condensors and my 835, and a couple of other mics, I went to my last resort SM58. On her voice..... it sounded wonderful.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#8
Quote by axemanchris
The 'industry standard' for live vocals is the Shure SM58. However, that is not to say it is the best sounding mic. It is the industry standard because they are found virtually everywhere because they are cheap, reliable, and sound okay enough. Everyone has used one, so it serves as an excellent universal point of reference.

For me, personally, I love my Sennheiser e835. Back-to-back with an SM58, it makes the 58 sound like singing through wet moving blankets.

If you play guitar and sing, the 835 isn't so directional that your voice fades out if you go slightly off-axis. The e845 is more directional, which suits a person who only sings much better.

The more directional the mic, the more resistant it is to feeding back, but the tradeoff is that you have to be really precise about singing right into it. When you're not actually holding the mic, you can't be that precise. That makes the 835 an excellent compromise. It's also about the same price as the SM58.

Caution, though.... different mics sound better on different instruments and on different voices. I recorded a singer and, after going through a couple of condensors and my 835, and a couple of other mics, I went to my last resort SM58. On her voice..... it sounded wonderful.

CT


Pretty much this.

As for the amp, try your hardest to steer away from an electric guitar amp, as they are more so designed for electric guitar style cleans and distortion, as opposed to something like a keyboard amp which is designed to get the purest sound of whatever is being put into it. Plus guitar amps feedback with microphones a lot easier.
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#10
No prob.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.