#1
The title sums it up. When you started singing or even now, have you been uncomfortable or unsatisfied with your range? I don't mean that you wanted to hit a note that was a little out of your range, I mean that you would have rather had a different range entirely.

For example, I'm a baritone, and even though I'm a huge Jim Morrison fan, the singers that I tried to imitate when I started were people like Maynard James Keenan (Tool/A Perfect Circle), Chino Moreno (Deftones), Richard Patrick (Filter), and Billy Howerdel (Ashes Divide), who are all more or less tenors. As a result, a lot of my earlier attempts at singing just really used the weaker, upper part of my range.

I've been going back and re-doing some of my songs from last year -- when I started singing -- and now I'm singing everything a bit lower. It feels a lot more comfortable and natural that way, and I've gotten a lot more comfortable with being a baritone, if I want to sing something by the bands I mentioned above, I just sing an octave or so down.
#2
I definatly dont like what "range" I have now. I dont sing publicly, altho that might change. But my favorite singers are people like Cove Reber from Saosin, Anthony Green, Jonny Craig, and other people like them. And I'm no where even close to any of them. I can maybe hit some of their lower, softer stuff, or if they do acoustic stuff, but thats about it.
#3
I found that, as I got more comfortable with my voice and was better able to assess what it does best, my musical tastes took a decided shift towards that area. I found that I just 'liked' more stuff if it was something that I could at least sort of sing.


CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#5
There were times I wish I was a tenor. I was realy in to power/heavy metal. But I had a shift of perspective like Chris and now I'm just happy with being a baritone
#6
Quote by axemanchris
I found that, as I got more comfortable with my voice and was better able to assess what it does best, my musical tastes took a decided shift towards that area. I found that I just 'liked' more stuff if it was something that I could at least sort of sing.


CT


Similar for me. I have a pretty good voice for singing country and bluegrass.....only problem is I don't like the new stuff so much. But I have started listening to and learning more older country songs. Even though I don't like the genre as much as rock, it's easier and more fun for me to sing.
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#7
I don't hate it, but I definately wish it were better. I just need like....half an octave higher than what I have now and I'd be mostly content.
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#9
Don't be discouraged. I am a full fledged baritone (My lowest note not in vocal fry is a low D, as in if you drop-D a standard guitar.) I took lessons for a few months, and have been practicing daily anywhere from a half hour just singing in my car, to a few hours when I'm alone in my living room, for about two years now. Before I began lessons, my top note was the high E on a guitar (E above middle C.) Now, in full voice, I can reach the A above high C with little effort, and any note in-between. I went from singing solely Johnny Cash and more limited range Doors stuff to covering Led Zeppelin and Soundgarden. Your range can always be improved, and don't let anyone tell you otherwise.
#10
Quote by Chaingarden
Don't be discouraged. I am a full fledged baritone (My lowest note not in vocal fry is a low D, as in if you drop-D a standard guitar.) I took lessons for a few months, and have been practicing daily anywhere from a half hour just singing in my car, to a few hours when I'm alone in my living room, for about two years now. Before I began lessons, my top note was the high E on a guitar (E above middle C.) Now, in full voice, I can reach the A above high C with little effort, and any note in-between. I went from singing solely Johnny Cash and more limited range Doors stuff to covering Led Zeppelin and Soundgarden. Your range can always be improved, and don't let anyone tell you otherwise.



Do you do any specific exercises for working on increasing your range, or was it just constant singing over a period of time that did it? And did you try to sing stuff that "pushed" your range in order to increase it, or did it just happen naturally?
#11
Quote by jdport
Do you do any specific exercises for working on increasing your range, or was it just constant singing over a period of time that did it? And did you try to sing stuff that "pushed" your range in order to increase it, or did it just happen naturally?


It was largely trial and error for me. When I started singing, I was listening to a lot of guys with really high voices, and guys who were singing melodies in very uncomfortable places. I'm really more of a feel guy than a technique guy, and I know it's terrible advice, and you probably shouldn't listen to me when I say this, but I don't really do scales and exercises. I'll do some sirens to smooth out my bridges, and do a few scales in places of my voice that are uncomfortable or cracky, especially when I've just woken up in the morning, but I don't do the whole 30-minute warm-up routine deal.

A few things I wish I has known while I was learning to increase my range though...

1. Never EVER push your chest voice up. In other words, you don't get higher notes by shouting or pushing harder. You can get extremely gruff vocals on high notes by mixing a disproportionate amount of chest voice in your mix (I'm not really sure if I use this term the same way Speech Level Singing coaches do) with some extra air to get a "distortion," but for me, it feels more like flexing a muscle than reaching for the note. You should never feel like you're reaching for a note unless it is legitimately out of your range (I'm talking about maybe the upper soprano range, like between G and C above male high C.)

2. Don't ever consciously try to alter the way you sing in order to sound like a different singer. If you ever want to imitate a singer, alter the way you pronounce words, and use the natural tone alterations in your voice, rather than contorting any muscle on your body in order to imitate a different singer. It may be okay for a while, but it's going to get VERY tiring, and your voice won't keep up. It should feel like you're singing in roughly the same "place" that you talk (don't take this too literally, it's going to feel different when you hit a very high note, but it shouldn't feel like you're shoving that note anywhere. Speaking of which...)

3. Don't try to force resonance anywhere, even in your mask, unless you're going for a very strange (often niche) tone.

4. Don't overemphasize diaphragmatic support. It should never feel like you're taking a ****, or doing crunches, or keeping a gigantic hot air balloon in your stomach. Diaphragmatic breathing is important, but if you're breathing from your diaphragm, you're doing just fine in this area.

5. If you're taking any sort of instruction that requires you to do anything that is straight up uncomfortable for more than a minute or two (diaphragmatic breathing and resonance will feel WEIRD at first, but they're not going to be uncomfortable or stressful by any means) it's more than likely trash. Be wary of instruction that tells you "this will probably be uncomfortable for a while, but you'll eventually get used to it."

6. Singing will usually be loud when you're doing high, powerful notes, but not shouty. It should still be pleasing to listen to. If you see people cringing when you blast into a high note, you're more than likely doing something incorrectly.

Let me know if you need any other help.
#12
Yeah, I've always wanted to be a tenor, but I've accepted that I'm not. So now I'm happy with being a bass-baritone, or whatever my "classification" is. I'm still working on securing that G4, though .
#13
Quote by Chaingarden
Don't be discouraged. I am a full fledged baritone (My lowest note not in vocal fry is a low D, as in if you drop-D a standard guitar.) I took lessons for a few months, and have been practicing daily anywhere from a half hour just singing in my car, to a few hours when I'm alone in my living room, for about two years now. Before I began lessons, my top note was the high E on a guitar (E above middle C.) Now, in full voice, I can reach the A above high C with little effort, and any note in-between. I went from singing solely Johnny Cash and more limited range Doors stuff to covering Led Zeppelin and Soundgarden. Your range can always be improved, and don't let anyone tell you otherwise.


This
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I'm in a similar situation where I used to be able to sing in a more tenor-soprano range .. but since my voice changed I haven't really sang that much (about 10yrs).. so when I started back singing while I could still hit some high note it sounded horrible and I was more comfortable basically from baritone range up to a middle C .. and got tuned to the idea that that's my new "good sounding" range
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Then I started using Singing Success in like late July or so and since then I could hit up to a B above high C ... with my Top range being a lot more stable and better sounding ....... basically I could sing Zeppelin, Mars Volta type stuff with no problem ... but as far as my own stuff I'm having a hard time deciding how to sing it in a tastefull manner using my new range ... since I kind of got trapped/wired into singing it a certain way, whereas when I originally wrote the lyrics it was based on what my original range was.

So do you guys have any solutions to this problem
#14
Quote by renk
This
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I'm in a similar situation where I used to be able to sing in a more tenor-soprano range .. but since my voice changed I haven't really sang that much (about 10yrs).. so when I started back singing while I could still hit some high note it sounded horrible and I was more comfortable basically from baritone range up to a middle C .. and got tuned to the idea that that's my new "good sounding" range
.
.
Then I started using Singing Success in like late July or so and since then I could hit up to a B above high C ... with my Top range being a lot more stable and better sounding ....... basically I could sing Zeppelin, Mars Volta type stuff with no problem ... but as far as my own stuff I'm having a hard time deciding how to sing it in a tastefull manner using my new range ... since I kind of got trapped/wired into singing it a certain way, whereas when I originally wrote the lyrics it was based on what my original range was.

So do you guys have any solutions to this problem


Yeah, don't change it if it sounds good. If you wrote songs that are suitable for deep voice stuff, keep it deep. There's no sense in writing songs to have really high notes just for the sake of having really high notes.
#15


A few things I wish I has known while I was learning to increase my range though...

1. Never EVER push your chest voice up. In other words, you don't get higher notes by shouting or pushing harder. You can get extremely gruff vocals on high notes by mixing a disproportionate amount of chest voice in your mix (I'm not really sure if I use this term the same way Speech Level Singing coaches do) with some extra air to get a "distortion," but for me, it feels more like flexing a muscle than reaching for the note. You should never feel like you're reaching for a note unless it is legitimately out of your range (I'm talking about maybe the upper soprano range, like between G and C above male high C.)


Let me know if you need any other help.


Thanks for all the pointers and advice. One question I have is about head and chest voice. I've read about the difference and how the sound resonates differently but I am not sure I understand how to change from head or chest voice. I suspect that I am naturally using chest voice when I sing in my "lower range" and head when I sing in my "higher" range... but up until I just recently started actually trying to work on my voice and reading about it I never even knew about the different areas where my voice could resonate. So how does one intentionally shift their voice from their chest... into chest and head and then into mostly head? (I assume there is still some chest resonance even when you are singing with your head voice). I was looking at your comment about never pushing my chest voice up and I don't know if I'm doing that or not.
#16
Quote by jdport
Thanks for all the pointers and advice. One question I have is about head and chest voice. I've read about the difference and how the sound resonates differently but I am not sure I understand how to change from head or chest voice. I suspect that I am naturally using chest voice when I sing in my "lower range" and head when I sing in my "higher" range... but up until I just recently started actually trying to work on my voice and reading about it I never even knew about the different areas where my voice could resonate. So how does one intentionally shift their voice from their chest... into chest and head and then into mostly head? (I assume there is still some chest resonance even when you are singing with your head voice). I was looking at your comment about never pushing my chest voice up and I don't know if I'm doing that or not.


If you're ever feeling like you're reaching for a note, or needing to get a lot louder in order to nail it, you're most likely pulling up your chest voice. Here's a good way to feel and hear the distinction. When you speak, you are almost certainly using your chest voice. You would sound ridiculous if you were speaking in your head voice all the time. To get a feeling of head voice resonance, hoot like an owl. That's what it feels like to use head resonance. When you're singing very high notes, even if they sound belted, that's where you should be feeling it. Ideally, for most notes, you should be feeling a mix of both resonances.
#17
Quote by Chaingarden
Yeah, don't change it if it sounds good. If you wrote songs that are suitable for deep voice stuff, keep it deep. There's no sense in writing songs to have really high notes just for the sake of having really high notes.


Nah, I think you're misunderstanding a bit ... I wrote the lyrics for a high voice .. since that is how I used to sing ... but I became accustomed to singing in a deeper tone since that was the voice I thought I had (had the most control over) ... now after a bit of training/vocal exercises I became comfortable singing high again (since I now have a lot more control over it)... and now have a vocal range that a lot bigger than I thought I did/ would ever have
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So now I'm struggling with singing with what I was once comfortable with (but not how I intended the song to be sang) vs using the range I have now, have grown a bit comfortable with but have not yet learned how to use it properly
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Basically now I find myself oversinging things/ putting runs where they need not be
#19
Quote by Alex Vik
I've got a fairly large vocal range, but the only thing I wish is that I could hit maybe 5 notes lower than my lowest note currently.


I don't think that's gonna happen unless you use vocal fry or your voice hasn't changed yet. You might get a semitone or two at the bottom as you age but generally you're not going to gain any notes at the bottom of your range through training, though you can make the low notes you have more powerful.