#1
I've noticed that all the bands and vocalists that inspire me are obviously tenors, usually hitting notes like the C above middle C, and sometimes higher, in their chest voice. (I'm talking about vocalists such as Jonny Craig, Geoff Rickly, or even Bert McCracken for example)

Anyway, my question is, do you think someone with a considerably lower range could front a band in that sort of genre? My most comfortable range is from low F (in guitar terms, the first fret on the low E string. I think thats low F..) to the F on the 10th fret on the G string...I can hit the 13th at most if I'm really warmed up and basically scream it. obviously I can go higher with falsetto but mine sounds extremely weak and I've been told it wouldn't work with the genre.

I've also been told that it doesn't sound 'energetic enough' when the vocal melodies are that low over that kind of music...Just hoping I can get some vocalist's opinions on it here.
Last edited by Thomasoman at Oct 2, 2009,
#2
What genre are you talking about?

John Mayer and Jack Johnson are both basses/baritones, if that helps.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#3
I'm a baritone, and sang baritone chorally for about 3 years, and was totally against trying to expand my range (I started to get troubles going slightly above middle C). I started being able to hit 1 note below the standard baritone range (F1), and after 6 months of working at it I can hit *slightly* higher then the tenor range (E4) still in my chest voice, clear and strong with no wavering.

I've just worked on using my diaphgram and pushing my voice more, probably 1-2 hours of singing every day in upper ranges and my range greatly expanded.
Quote by Venice King
Beethoven ****ed Jimi Hendrix and I was born. I make my own music.
#4
The word 'push' scares me here. If you sing properly, you shouldn't be pushing any more than you push your voice to talk.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#5
Hahaha.... I meant with my diaphgram, to get a powerful clear note, and give more air support for the higher notes, not pushing or tensing my throat. I have 7 years singing experience and 2 years screaming,

I know what you mean though, pushing for volume and vocal distortion n such.
Quote by Venice King
Beethoven ****ed Jimi Hendrix and I was born. I make my own music.
Last edited by Ghast at Oct 2, 2009,
#6
Quote by food1010
What genre are you talking about?


Post-hardcore I guess. Bands like Thursday or like...I guess The Used's early albums. Thrice ect ect.

And I'm not really talking about improving my range here, I've been told by vocal coaches that I probably wont be able to extend my range past A (the one at the 14th fret G string, I don't know the technical name for it). So that wouldn't really make much of a difference.

I'm basically just asking if you think range is that important with this kind of music, just because it seems to be predominantly (if not exclusively) tenors or high baritones.
#7
I still disagree. Pushing with your diaphragm results in forcing the air out past the vocal cords. Think of your air as your fuel for singing. You don't want to be the drag racer that burns it all off in two seconds, which is what happens when you push with the diaphragm.

What you want to do is to try to maintain as much air in the lungs as possible, by maintaining the diaphragm in a downward position. This gives your voice a firmer foundation, and one that can be controlled and maintained over a much longer period.

Volume does not come from pushing with the diaphragm. Volume comes from a combination of aiming the voice off the hard palate, achieving resonance, and supporting the air with the diaphragm.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#8
Maybe I'm already holding it down?.... I can do a high note 20 seconds without needing to take a breath.

I'm also naturally loud, like really loud. I would love if someone told me whats up with the natural volume differences between people.
Quote by Venice King
Beethoven ****ed Jimi Hendrix and I was born. I make my own music.
#9
It's just a matter of coordination. Many popular rock singers that sing in a high register are naturally baritones. They were not born with that range. You have to coordinate your range throughout. Many people in the classical discipline feel that with enough diaphragmatic support, you can push your chest voice to these upper bounds, or something of that nature. Not so. This will result in fatigue, or worse, damage. It's about finesse, not force. You need to let your voice transition into the upper "heady" resonating chambers, and let go of the weighty chest feel.

Anyone who tells you that in order to sing high notes, you need to be born with such ability, or you need to already possess a tenor voice is bull****ting you. Listen to people like David Lee Roth, Chris Cornell, and Axl Rose speak, and then listen to them sing. You'll see what I mean. Do a little test for me. Make a high pitched "hoot" sound, like an owl. Do this as high pitched as you can, even if it sounds womanly. With enough coordination and practice, you should be able to produce this tone with your full voice (meaning, you'll sound like a rock singer, not a choir girl.) Seriously, if people are telling you, especially in a rock context, that you won't be able to sing this high, tell them to take a hike, because they are likely teaching you outdated, if not detrimental singing techniques.