#1
This has been bothering me for awhile, as a good title captivates the listener's interest and remembers the particular song as unique in its own way, distinguishing it from other generic songs.

I've been writing the ending of a story, where the character is crushed tragically and forced back into his own nightmare; reality. If anyone would help and give hints about giving correct titles to songs, this thread would be very helpful to many people.

Thank you.
#2
A song title can be anything - a line from the song, a random word that came to the writer during the writing process, a too-long title failing to seem rebellious or different, the theme of the song, the name of whom the song is about, etc.

The key is to make it yours. Different artists tend to have a theme for their song titles. Fall Out Boy, for instance, tends to have too-long song names. Most pop artists tend to have a line from the chorus as the title. Taking Back Sunday used to use random phrases from magazines. It's all about making the song title represent you, as an artist, a person.

I hope that my advice can give you some sort of direction when naming your songs.
#3
It's all preference. You can use a single word or phrase that appears in the piece, or a word that outlines the emotions or feelings that come from reading the piece or that were involved in writing it.

Or, it can just be a random phrase. I used a line from a rap song as the title of one of my pieces once, and it had nothing to do with the piece. Nobody seemed to notice. However, I don't recommend doing that...
Today I feel electric grey
I hope tomorrow, neon black
#4
Quote by Ganoosh

Or, it can just be a random phrase. I used a line from a rap song as the title of one of my pieces once, and it had nothing to do with the piece. Nobody seemed to notice. However, I don't recommend doing that...


I do
Quote by SLonergan
I think the Raw Power guitars look like badly painted Easter Eggs.


Peter Green Jimi Hendrix Tom Morello Joe Bonamassa John Frusciante Eric Clapton Paul Gilbert B.B. King
#5
Quote by Cachao
I do


You shouldn't.
Today I feel electric grey
I hope tomorrow, neon black
#6
just joking
Quote by SLonergan
I think the Raw Power guitars look like badly painted Easter Eggs.


Peter Green Jimi Hendrix Tom Morello Joe Bonamassa John Frusciante Eric Clapton Paul Gilbert B.B. King
#8
It depends on what your song is about, and what kind of song it is. If its a love song that you're writing your girlfriend or soon-to-be girlfriend, then naming the song after the girl isn't too bad of an idea.
If your song is a death-metal song that is about pillaging villages, raping the churches and burning the women, your song title would be best suited being about raping churches and burning women.

A one sentence answer: You can never go wrong making your title what the song is about.
#9
What i like, but it almost depends on the song you write, is to use the last word or pharse in the chorus or song. but, yeah, like mentioned before, just use either the theme of the song, who it was wrote for, maybe even how the song makes you feel. write the song before you come up with the title- unless you already had in mind that the title was gonna be what the song is about. I also like to use a line that may appear in the interlude or bridge of a song. But a song title can be just about anything. I dont know if you listen to My Chemical Romance, but two of their songs, for example, one is called "Cancer"; the song is ABOUT Cancer, but the word never appears in the song. And "Famous Last Words"; I'm not even sure where that song name came from, because the words, again, dont appear in the song, and the song lyrics don't give any indications about it refering to someones "Famous Last Words". Hope that helps!! ; )
#10
Quote by lilemokid19
What i like, but it almost depends on the song you write, is to use the last word or pharse in the chorus or song. but, yeah, like mentioned before, just use either the theme of the song, who it was wrote for, maybe even how the song makes you feel. write the song before you come up with the title- unless you already had in mind that the title was gonna be what the song is about. I also like to use a line that may appear in the interlude or bridge of a song. But a song title can be just about anything. I dont know if you listen to My Chemical Romance, but two of their songs, for example, one is called "Cancer"; the song is ABOUT Cancer, but the word never appears in the song. And "Famous Last Words"; I'm not even sure where that song name came from, because the words, again, dont appear in the song, and the song lyrics don't give any indications about it refering to someones "Famous Last Words". Hope that helps!! ; )


Famous Last Words is where the patient (presumably) dies. It's his last words alive.

Sorry. I don't have much to contribute to the actual topic that hasn't already been said. The first thing that comes in your head when you think of that particular song is the title for that song.
#11
The song title isn't nearly as important as the quality of the music. Though you are correct that some song titles just don't scream "LISTEN TO ME", I think you should just name songs whatever the hell you want (even if they don't sound very appealing) and once they become more popular people will hear about them and have to listen to em anyways =)
#12
It all depends on the audience, which indirectly depends on genre, image, etc.

For 95% of music I really think simple titles that mention a main image in the song or a bit from the chorus are best for audiences. It helps them remember the song, think about it when they're not hearing it, and gets them hungry to go looking for it again. That's exactly what you want.

Of course (I'm stereotyping in a fun nice way, not a derogatory one) if you play entirely for coffee shop hipsters, hardcore emos, or artrock kids, you're going to want at least 5 words in your title that don't have any direct connection to the immediate lyrics.

Yeah I exaggerate, but actually I don't, and the premise would remain true even if I was exaggerating. It's almost always about keeping your listeners interested and helping them remember the song when they're not actually listening to it.

The few exceptions are things like:
The song having no words or very few, and you need to imply some of the meaning via a meaningful title.

The Song is very immediate and to the point, so you use the title to create an immediate background, context, or setting,

and a other stuff like that.
Last edited by dullsilver_mike at Oct 30, 2009,
#13
My song titles are usually long and have nothing to do with the song, but people easily remember them because they're either funny, or they make you think. For example:
-The Cheese Grater Slide
-Can't Wait To See Your Two Faces Again
-An Organ Grinder Sounds Like A Gruesome Job
-I'll See Your Truth, And Raise You A Sorry
-Piñata Knife Surprise
and -It Won't Cost You An Arm And A Leg If You Give Me A Hand
Remember, it's not only about length, it's also about impact.

I also agree with lilemokid19. Try naming it without being obvious
#14
it's completely creativity, I try to find the words that give the best imagery but that's not something I've ever been able to explain to anyone. take some LSD