#1
Hey, I was just wondering if anyone knows of any guides, or could give me some introduction or whatever on basic jazz soloing. Thanks
#4
Well, I've been playing 3 years, I know my major scales. How would I apply them to jazz soloing?
#5
use them to play over jazz songs start with autumn leaves or blue bossa or something
get some aebersolds or band in a box and play over it
#6
Follow the chord with diatonic modes, dont be a douche that mindlessy follows a major shape.
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#7
Jazz soloing is not traditionally done with strict scales. It's done with chord tones.

For example, if your chord progression is Dm7 G7 (a pretty basic Latin jazz progression), you could use the notes D F A C over the Dm7 and G B D F over the G7. Other notes are welcome, of course, but those notes are "safe," so to speak. Arpeggios are big business in jazz, with passing tones thrown in for good measure.
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#8
the best way to learn jazz is to just steal lots of licks this other stuff is important but transcribing is the most important
#9
Quote by acoolbuffguy
the best way to learn jazz is to just steal lots of licks this other stuff is important but transcribing is the most important


Well, you COULD just steal a bunch of other people's licks; or you could actually learn the theory behind playing jazz. Like the other guy said: follow the chord tones and mix in a lot of arpeggiated ideas and passing tones. It's important that you realize what your chord tones are for each chord that you play over. Playing a scale over a tritone substitution just isn't going to cut it.
#10
A good mixture of Scale Tones and Arpeggios (chord tones) is a good start. Mix in some chromatic approach notes and it will instantly give it a "Jazzy" sound. You can also use a technique called "Pitch Axis", which means switching between different scales while maintaining the same root note. For example, if you are playing in the key of A major, you can use any major scale type with A as the root note. For instance, A Major, A Lydian, A Mixolydian, etc.

Studying and analyzing other Jazz riffs is also a great way to learn, but you shouldn't steal riffs that other guitarists are known for. Use them to learn and create your own riff vocabulary.
#12

Well, you COULD just steal a bunch of other people's licks; or you could actually learn the theory behind playing jazz. Like the other guy said: follow the chord tones and mix in a lot of arpeggiated ideas and passing tones. It's important that you realize what your chord tones are for each chord that you play over. Playing a scale over a tritone substitution just isn't going to cut it.



So... uhm, lydian dominant wouldn't cut it over a tritone sub?

Transcribing is essential to jazz. Listen listen listen, learn your favourite solos. When you learn a new tune, learn famous musician's solos.