#1
I'm having so much trouble trying to find a melody for vocals. What Ive been doing is getting lyrics down, a chord progression and then trying to belt out a melody from there but it aint working too good, i just stick around the same area and it gets boring. Ive also tried writing it out on guitar first then singing but that also lacks interest.
Do you guys have any tips on how to write a fresh and non-boring melody for vocals.
Maybe the fact that im not a super singer affects the problem.

Thanks alot for any help i'de really appreciate it !
#2
ok well...im not going to help that much but i just started learning how to sing properly because i could never sing amazingly and when i sing my songs they are usualy acoustic so because they are acoustic i just whip out my epi acoustic and play and sing when i do it,it usualy varies from time to time because i dont sing the same 100% of the time and i find that i tend to only do one or two changes in my vocals and if you want you can just use like a vibrato in your vocals from time to time to change it up...its like playing melodic notes on guitar you can use vibrato,tremelo,etc you can even do a scream then a really soft light note..but like i said i just started out doing singing lessonsish kind of thing so i wouldnt take my advice id take a different persons lol
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#3
... and this, my friend, is why the songwriters make more money than those who just play. This is exactly why, for the purposes of copyright, that a song is defined as the lyrics and melody, because those are far more difficult to come up with than a bunch of riffs and some sweeps or some chugging or whatever.

Seriously, your question is huge. Effectively, it is asking "How do I write a song?" Great. You have lyrics. You're about a quarter of the way there.

This is a skill that needs to be developed over time, just like anything else. I, personally, find it difficult to take existing music and add a melody over top, and then make lyrics fit to that.

For me, I find it easiest to come up with a vocal melody I like as a starting point. That may just come from a tune popping into your head, or it may come as an evolution of a melodic line you find on the guitar that is easily singable or whatever. Once I have a vocal line, or at least the start of one, I right away start trying to add lyrics - even if they are only tentative - because the phrasing of your lyric will dictate how your phrase the rest of the melody. At this point, it's almost like growing a seed.

Once your melody line is starting to get fleshed out, I then start trying to find an accompaniment on guitar. It might, at this point, be something as simple as open position chords. As long as it is something to help support that melody. I can adapt those chords into riffs or something more interesting later, but for now, they'll do.

Once I get a complete verse and chorus, I start thinking about how it could be best produced. What kind of drum beat, bass line, riffs, etc. that will best support it. Keep watering the seed and giving it sunshine and hope that it grows.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#4
Quote by axemanchris
I, personally, find it difficult to take existing music and add a melody over top, and then make lyrics fit to that.

For me, I find it easiest to come up with a vocal melody I like as a starting point.


I'm generally the opposite, although I'm writing melodies for someone else to sing, so I tend to start with a guitar part (being a guitarist) and lyrics (often that someone else provides).

This seems to be your situation as well - what I tend to do is listen to the guitar pro tab I've made of the part I've come up with (although a recording should give the same effect) with the lyrics in front of me. After a few goes through, a note or phrase or two will generally have suggested itself and I try to either figure out what's in my head on the guitar or (normally) directly onto the pro tab.

If you're a singer then you can (as you said) just sing the melody you hear in your head, but I think it might be worth at least experimenting with the method I use, because I find you get a really good connection with what actual notes you're using and (more importantly) how they relate to each other in terms of intervals and how they relate to the backing harmony in terms of which chord tones (or extensions) the melody notes are.

I've definitely found that the more I write melodies in this way, the more I'm able to imagine a phrase and know which of the root/third/fifth/whatever the phrase needs to start on, what the interval is between two notes etc. I was terrible - really terrible - at this when I started, sometimes I gave up trying to tab/work out what I'd imagined because I just couldn't find the notes and now it rarely takes me more than a few minutes to get a bar of what I imagine down onto a tab:

Quote by axemanchris
This is a skill that needs to be developed over time, just like anything else.
Quote by Ed O'Brien
“It’s not genius. It’s just that if you want something good to come out of something, you have to put in a lot of effort. That involves a lot of hard work, and a lot of blood, sweat and tears sometimes.”

http://urbanscarecrow.bandcamp.com/
#5
Whenever I'm having difficulty with this, I screw around with chord tones just to get me started. I'm a pretty firm believer in just doing whatever comes to mind, so I would try just playing some chords and then singing/humming whatever melody comes to mind. You might not be great at it right away, but you'll improve over time.

This is one approach. You by no means have to do it this way. This is just the way I do it.
#6
thanks! alot of sick info and advice. I'll take all into account and try em out (that rhymed).
#7
Quote by Damascus
I'm generally the opposite,


Yes. Everyone works a little bit differently. Maybe if I had a better way, I'd be a more prolific writer.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#8
Quote by axemanchris
Yes. Everyone works a little bit differently. Maybe if I had a better way, I'd be a more prolific writer.

CT


Like I said, I think the way I write melodies stems from the situation I'm in - having a guitar part (that possibly has bass & drums to it as well) and a bunch of lyrics and not being able to sing very well, so I'm pretty much forced to write melodies to existing music and in a way other than singing them out myself.

Also, shouldn't you have "has got a singing forum" under your name now?
Quote by Ed O'Brien
“It’s not genius. It’s just that if you want something good to come out of something, you have to put in a lot of effort. That involves a lot of hard work, and a lot of blood, sweat and tears sometimes.”

http://urbanscarecrow.bandcamp.com/
#9
Hehe... guess I need to change that.

@Rusty - there is a lot of truth to that. The only danger is that coming up with rhythmic vocals before composing the melody is that you tend to limit yourself away from longer-held notes.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#10
I construct vocal melodies in a similar way to constructing riffs or solos on the guitar. I'll generally start with a chord structure, identify roots notes, 5ths and 3rds within the chords, and then link them with the appropriate scale for the key. Not too hard.

However sometimes I'll think of a short vocal melody with lyrics and then grab the guitar and make a chord structure which suits it. This is harder because you can sometimes forget the melody when you grab the guitar. Something to record with and scale knowledge is handy for this.

My real problem is writing lyrics, I generally don't listen to lyrics when I listen to music, so it's harder for me to make an emotional connection to them.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#11
I just have trouble - I write vaguely catchy melodies (that sometimes can be too up-and-down), then stick with them for the whole verse, so it ends up sounding way too poppy. But I can't write lyrics well without fitting them to a template