#5
Just clean it with some lemon oil, and then use a very, but VERY THIN steel wool to polish the frets
If you want to get your fretboard a new look, then remove the fretsn and use some sandpaper to sand the fretboard, but not too much
#6
Take the strings off, and rub it a bit with a dry cloth, or some kitchen roll. Even scraping it off with a pick is okay if your gentle.
Cam Sampbell's my hero
#8
There's nothing wrong with using Lemon Oil. It's a standard way to rejuvenate/recondition wooden fretboards.
First you need to clean the fretboard though, don't count on lemon (or any other oil) to do that.
A plastic credit card can be used to scrape heavy buildup of mung (old sweat and dirt) from the board. Then steel wool (000 or 0000 grade) is used to clean the pores of the wood by rubbing it in the direction of the grain (ie up & down the fretboard). Then it can also be used to polish the fret tops.
Now with a clean flannel or cotton cloth apply lemon oil onto the cloth (sparingly) and work it into the wood, removing excess oil with a dry cloth afterwards.
Simple. (ref Dan Erlewine's GP Repair Guide Ver 2)
Moving on.....
#9
Quote by KenG
There's nothing wrong with using Lemon Oil. It's a standard way to rejuvenate/recondition wooden fretboards.
First you need to clean the fretboard though, don't count on lemon (or any other oil) to do that.
A plastic credit card can be used to scrape heavy buildup of mung (old sweat and dirt) from the board. Then steel wool (000 or 0000 grade) is used to clean the pores of the wood by rubbing it in the direction of the grain (ie up & down the fretboard). Then it can also be used to polish the fret tops.
Now with a clean flannel or cotton cloth apply lemon oil onto the cloth (sparingly) and work it into the wood, removing excess oil with a dry cloth afterwards.
Simple. (ref Dan Erlewine's GP Repair Guide Ver 2)

Lemon oil just darkens your fretboard, but it takes oils from your wood and dries up your board so I don't see how that would rejuvenate it.
#10
What about just using some Pledge??????
"Well, yeah, sometimes I get a little too creative."
~Bruce Dickinson~



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"Various equipments"
#12
^ reason???
"Well, yeah, sometimes I get a little too creative."
~Bruce Dickinson~



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"Various equipments"
#13
Quote by kennethdave
^ reason???


Pledge and other common household wood cleaner/polish products sometimes contain silicone additives = bad for untreated wood (especially Rosewood as this is usually left untreated on fretboards)
#14
^ Effects when used for long periods??? In this case i've been using it for years and i still don't see side effects....and my fretboard is rosewood as well....
"Well, yeah, sometimes I get a little too creative."
~Bruce Dickinson~



-------------------------
"Various equipments"
#15
- remove all the strings

- remove off any serious build up (if it gets this far you've waited FAR to long to clean it) with a cloth and "elbow grease" and/or an old tooth brush

- carefully use 0000 steel wool, rubbing with the grain, to clean out the fretboard

- make/get a fretsaver the polish your frets with the steel wool

- coat the fretboard with a thin layer fretboard conditioner (call it what you will) using a flannel or microfiber cloth

- let it soak in for a few minutes.

- wipe it clean

!!! DO NOT SOAK THE FRETBOARD !!! this may cause your frets to loosen and rise due to wood swelling

- give the body and neck a good clean and polish as well with a clean microfiber cloth

- restring

To avoid going through all this EVERY time you restring, wash your hand before playing and with the strings and neck off afterwards.
--- Joe ---
77 Bradley LPC || 07 PRS CE22 || 11 PRS MC58 Artist || 95/02 Fender Strat || 99 Gibson LP DC Std Lite
06 Ovation Elite-T || 12 Martin GPCPA4
Boss GT100 || Peavey Stereo Chorus 400 || Peavey Bandit 75 || Roland JC77
Last edited by Auriemma at Oct 23, 2009,