#1
I was thinking of getting a Harley Benton G212 and replacing the speaker to Celestion G12H', but I heard the quiality of the cab makes a big tone difference, is this true?

Cheers,
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#2
Why do you want to change the speakers out? Seems like kinda a waste to me unless you're going for a very specific sound, those come stock with Vintage 30s in them.

The cab construction does make a difference in sound, but Harley Bentons are made dently, not the highest quality, but better than buying a Behringer or Peavey and upgrading the speakers
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#3
the G212 vintage is the cab with vintage 30's in them. But I don't like the sound of V30's, too modern sounding.
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You'll find whisky very different, but try it and you'll grow into it, soon you and whisky are one, but still two, lovers dancing across a frozen lake under moonlight, wrapped in honey and warmth.


Sums up whisky perfectly
#4
Quote by Jak Archer
I was thinking of getting a Harley Benton G212 and replacing the speaker to Celestion G12H', but I heard the quiality of the cab makes a big tone difference, is this true?

Cheers,


the factors that go into quality of cab is basically construction: what wood they use, how they assemble it.

i find that if they use baltic birch for the cabinet, then they really don't produce a bunch of baltic birch from all over the world(in fact i want to say most of it comes out of Russia?). this means the quality of baltic birch is going to be fairly flat(meaning that regardless of cab manufacturer you should be getting about the same quality of birch). the reasons why people use baltic birch is really because it is a voidless ply wood that does not resonate and therefore has less signal loss due to cabinet vibration.

you'll want ~18mm/13 ply thickness of baltic birch for a good solid construction. this stuff is not as durable as, say, pine; so you'll want a bit thicker ply for reinforcement and extra resistance to resonance. mind you pine is also a good option, it just has a different sound, and i spent more time talking of baltic birch because it is more commonly used today.

the 2nd big factor is construction technique, you'll want someone using finger joints or dovetails. i just don't even know of any manufacturers that use screws anymore(screws are bad), so this one is not too much of a concern. the 'better' technique seems to be dovetail joints when connecting the cabinet sides. but i find this makes cabs a bit more expensive.

the 3rd factor is design, the dimensions of a cabinet are pretty critical as well. usually what do is find a cabinet that is know is good(framus, orange, fender, sunn, marshall 1960's, etc) find their dimensions and compare them to what is out there. for example the avatar cabs have 3 types of cabinet and each one follows the dimensions of already established cabinets, that is kinda a good sign.

so as long as what yer looking at is comparable on materials, construction and design you should be getting a good cab. one more aside, i would really check out Ted Weber's celestion copies if you are interested in celestion. they are amazing and they come with more options and cost less(and their hand made in america...)
punk isn't dead, it's always smelled that way.

"A perfection of means, and confusion of aims, seems to be our main problem."
-ae
#5
^is there a big tonal difference with all the factors you mentioned?
Quote by Kensai
You'll find whisky very different, but try it and you'll grow into it, soon you and whisky are one, but still two, lovers dancing across a frozen lake under moonlight, wrapped in honey and warmth.


Sums up whisky perfectly
#6
I'm not exactly sure how big of a difference can the construction and the materials of the cab make, but considering the fact that a Harley Benton 4x12 cab loaded with V30's costs 345€ and a Mesa Boogie 4x12 Rectifier cab with the same V30's costs 1297€, I'm pretty sure the audible difference can't be even nearly worth the extra 900+€.
Gear:

Guitars: Ibanez SV5470F, Ibanez Xpt700, Fender MIM Standard Stratocaster ('04-'05), Jackson Ps-2
Ashton AG200,
Amps: ENGL E530, Bugera 6262-212,
FX: TC Electronics G-major 2, Behringer EQ700, Morley Volume / Wah
#7

^is there a big tonal difference with all the factors you mentioned?

yes, here is a link of people smarter than me who know how to explain all that

http://www.zinky.com/construction.html

the tone woods have really good explanations there.

the joints are more of a good practice deal, but you do want a joint that will seal the cab AND not be fragile and those are the main points for connecting joints.

design will fall into where your sound goes. don't get me wrong here, i am NOT saying guitar cabs get designed to the same exacting standards of HIFI audio cabinets so it is not as important to guitar as it is to HIFI audio but there are differences. a bigger [closed back] cab with more dead air space will yield a bigger low end response. closed back cabs also make it so most of the sound will come out the front of the cabinet. that may sound silly to say, but open back cabs have lots of sound coming out the back as well as the front. closed back cabs will actually impede full speaker motion because of the back pressure in the cab created by speaker movement. some closed back cabs have internal boards to help isolate the speakers to keep this effect from becoming over prominent(i've never worried about it myself, it is just a little more soft compression imo). open back cabs don't have such problems as there is no back pressure.

but still, i don't think cabinet choice is going to have as drastic an effect as say amp choice or speaker choice, but the marriage of all three is how you get 'the tone'. when you have all three matched up to what you want, that is when you will be satisfied.
punk isn't dead, it's always smelled that way.

"A perfection of means, and confusion of aims, seems to be our main problem."
-ae