#1
I want to start a practice schedule and maybe you guys can help me a bit.

So I'm 18years old and just started out on an old acoustic guitar I found at home(for about 2-3months).I feel I'm not improving as much as I could,so I think I need a practice routine.Also I'm taking classical music lessons(guitar+lessons),to learn properly how to play music.

Next week I'm going to buy an electric so I'll be playing classical+electric.

*I listen to pop punk,post-grunge and sometimes some hard rock(but not so much).

*My goals are :having a good technical skill(that's one of the reasons I'm taking classical guitar for about a year I think),play covers and then maybe my own stuff and playing in band.

*I'm really motivated so I'm going to practice 3-5hours a day.

People told me to learn scales and chords on my classical guitar(actually left hand technique) because I can transfer those directly to my electric and some stuff I will have to directly on an electric.

How would you guys divide your practice time and what to learn?
#2
I'm not the one that can help you with a schedule, but how do you (18 years old) have 3-5 hours/day practice time?
#3
Quote by hsteve3
I'm not the one that can help you with a schedule, but how do you (18 years old) have 3-5 hours/day practice time?


Actually pretty easy even if I have lots of school stuff to do.
-Very little time watching tv or on my computer(mostly for school)
-Don't hang out with people that you believe are a waste of time,only those you like hanging out with.
-And I don't go to parties as much as I used to,but maybe that will come back.
-Before going to sleep I can practice at least 3hours between 8-12.

I'm not going to practice 5hours each day that's for sure but an average of 4hours or a little less could be realistic.
#4
Classical guitar lessons are a great start! You will no doubt make good progress with a teacher.

Studies show students make better progress with "Spaced Repetition" practice, which is practicing in shorter amounts of time, more frequently. Try practicing for 10 minutes, 10 times a day if possible.

After you get your electric, make sure to continue playing your acoustic every now and then, as this usually builds finger strength more so than thinner electric guitar strings. If you practice on your acoustic and then play on your electric, you will feel like your fingers are flying!
Last edited by dwguitar101 at Oct 4, 2009,
#5
Quote by dwguitar101
Classical guitar lessons are a great start! You will no doubt make good progress with a teacher.

Studies show students make better progress with "Spaced Repetition" practice, which is practicing in shorter amounts of time, more frequently. Try practicing for 10 minutes, 10 times a day if possible.

After you get your electric, make sure to continue playing your acoustic every now and then, as this usually builds finger strength more so than thinner electric guitar strings. If you practice on your acoustic and then play on your electric, you will feel like your fingers are flying!


I don't really understand your last sentence(sorry I'm not a native speaker).With acoustic do you mean nylon or steel strings?
#6
Quote by FlyingStar
I don't really understand your last sentence(sorry I'm not a native speaker).With acoustic do you mean nylon or steel strings?

I do all my technique practice on an acoustic with 12 gauge bronze strings
Drink the sauce. Go on, it's okay. Just remember, I am the quest.

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#7
Quote by dwguitar101

Studies show students make better progress with "Spaced Repetition" practice, which is practicing in shorter amounts of time, more frequently. Try practicing for 10 minutes, 10 times a day if possible.



Hey Man, do you have any links you can share? I was googling last night on this very subject (optimum frequency of practice for retention) and drew blanks.

EDIT: I've just googled "spaced repetition", and found a lot of interesting info - it looks like something that would definately apply to learning material. Do you have any links about how/if it applies to fine motor movement?
Last edited by se012101 at Oct 4, 2009,
#8
Quote by Bubbles203
I do all my technique practice on an acoustic with 12 gauge bronze strings


Yes I think that's certainly a good thing,I try to do it too.Actually before buying an electric I'm going to learn barre chords and stuff on my acoustic.
#9
se012101, I don't have any specific links or resources to give at the moment, but I would imagine spaced repetition could be applied to just about anything. If you are trying to develop/improve your fine motor skills, I think the best way to do that is practicing various coordination exercises (i.e. 1234, 4321, 1324, 1423, etc.) as slowly as you need to, making sure you are doing it PERFECTLY. And only then, increase the speed at which you are practicing these exercises in slow increments until you reach full speed. The important part is never going faster than you can do PERFECTLY. Remember, practice DOESN'T make perfect. PERFECT practice makes perfect!