#1
Hi guys, all on Yamaha RBX-374

in my search for a warm, creamy fat sound I fitted a set of new roundwound RotoSound 66's swing bass 40/60/80/100 stainless strings and found they sound.....well.....very much like the Yamaha OE strings I took off , poppy, twangy, trebly and have a bright, hard sound....I still find the describing tones a little difficult so be gentle on me!

Been doing some homework on this great site and it appears, if I understand correctly, that flatwounds may give me that warm, fat sound I want?

I'm looking at these:-

http://www.giggear.co.uk/p/D-Addario-ECB81-Flat-Wound/

Any recommendations guys?

I bought these Roto's weeks ago and didn't get around to fitting them, the only good part is that the shop assistant put two boxes in the bag but charged me for 1 set on my bill, so Ebay may have a set for sale, cheap!

thanks for your help and advice
Yamaha RBX-374, Orange Crush 20 and no talent!
Last edited by iconic at Oct 5, 2009,
#3
For someone who's been here less than half a year, you're pretty good at describing tones, actually.

I consider myself more of a stainless steel roundwound guy, ie the exact opposite of what you want, so I'm going by other players tones and just general hearsay. LaBellas are supposed to be very good. They're what James Jamerson used. The only flats I ever used were roto 77s, used by John Deacon, Phil Lynott, Roger Waters, and many others. I liked them a lot, they're actually pretty bright for flats, but not as crunchy. They had treble, sure, but the overall tone was pretty mellow. They're really good flats for rock, especially hard rock, IMO. Thomastic flats are really nice too:

http://bassfuzz.com/equipment/squier-vintage-modified-p-bass/ (BTW this is a great site if you ever want a distortion, fuzz, overdrive, or filter pedal)

If you want some more reviews of flats, this is a pretty good article. I disagree with him on the rotos, but again I'm into a brighter, treblier tone anyway:
http://bgra.net/2004/index.php?content=feature&page=flats
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#5
I've got Rotosound Trubass 88 strings on my fretless. Very mellow, and easy to play too.
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#6
thanks,

made a call to a real friendly bass player I met at our local village fete this summer, boy could he play and let me hold his F Bass 5 string, even though I'd had a few, which made my evening one of life's gentleman.

I got a set of Ernie Ball flatwound Group III's 45/65/80/100 in the end, why are guitar shops so sexy, more like a sweet shop....ohh and a Yamaha F310 acoustic for our 15 year old's birthday from Strings Direct in Southend, very helpful and very keen prices too!

http://www.stringsdirect.co.uk/products/585-ernie_ball_4_string_bass_flatwound_strings_40_95_45_100_50_105_55_110_

I'll chime back with I found

cheers for now
Yamaha RBX-374, Orange Crush 20 and no talent!
#8
One of the things about rotos is that they do mellow out after a few weeks to a very nice tone. Roto 88s are very close in tone to upright and are warm but thumpy.
#9
thanks for the hep guys,

fitted those Ernie's and hmm, real warm, lovely on the fingers too....I'm now a flatwound convert
Yamaha RBX-374, Orange Crush 20 and no talent!
#10
i need to get my hands on them 88s. my band would NOT be happy. but maybe i'll go back to playing my cheapo aria strung with rounds for them.
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#11
Man, all this string branding is a bluff. The only thing that matters is physical shape (gage, flats or rounds/halfs, etc) and the coating to a much lesser extent (chrome, anti-corrosion film). Get the cheapest ones that fit your criteria as everyone here will have different opinions as what label is best.
#12
Quote by KingStill
Man, all this string branding is a bluff. The only thing that matters is physical shape (gage, flats or rounds/halfs, etc) and the coating to a much lesser extent (chrome, anti-corrosion film). Get the cheapest ones that fit your criteria as everyone here will have different opinions as what label is best.



Hi guys,

can anyone expand on 'which' physical facet make 'which' change to the timbre?

1/....sure the flats give me a warmer sound, would a heavier gauge make them even 'fatter' on sound, not sure about about coatings, nickel = softer coating = duller, chrome = harder coating = brighter...I'm guessing out loud here

2/.....is it possible to go too large a gauge for a certain bass...I mean they need to fit the slots on the bridge, or do they all the same size bridge slots for a given string? I have seen strings of up to 130 thou, although being a metric child shouldn't that be 3.25mm

Yamaha RBX-374, Orange Crush 20 and no talent!
#13
D'addario Chromes are great. I've used them several times. Also, fender makes some nylon strings, the nylon tape wounds. They're actually roundwound strings but covered in nylon. I like those as well.

Hope this helps
#14
Man, all this string branding is a bluff. The only thing that matters is physical shape (gage, flats or rounds/halfs, etc) and the coating to a much lesser extent (chrome, anti-corrosion film). Get the cheapest ones that fit your criteria as everyone here will have different opinions as what label is best.


Well, not entirely. Different methods of making strings will make them sound different - 100% of the sound of strings comes from the exact nature of their vibrations, which will be different if they're constructed differently. This doesn't just mean 'flatwound v roundwound', but includes 'the machines D'Addario use apply X amount of pressure during the manufacture, which is 20% higher than Rotosound, which makes for a generally warmer sound' (clarification: I did just make those specifics up, but you get my point).

And that's ignoring the fact that different alloys of stainless steel might be used in different types of strings, or different materials used to coat different brands of flatwounds...