#1
my plan is to practise over major scale CDEFGAB, position 1 to 18, until i can play all of them at 160BPM

hopefully i can got it done in a year's time

but can anyone assure me that it will do me good?
#3
its probably better the do chromatic scales instead. That's the usual regime.
#4
Quote by m1tch4444
Well....you'll definately be able to play the C Major scale all over the neck.


have already done position 0 to 5 for C....
#5
you should probably practice scale shapes in more than just one key. you cant realy use a C major scale when your playing in E maj for example. But practicing playing them in lots of different positions is always a good idea.


:




.............................I Got Bored.
#6
It's an absolutely pointless exercise. Guitar is merely a medium for practicing and playing music on. There is absolutely zero musicality in running scales. Use them as a warm up, use the rest of your practice time learning how to apply them.
#7
^^^^^
I agree, there's only so much you will gain from 'practicing the C major scale'. Unless you want to play 'C major scale music' all your life! Branch out. Don't approach guitar with such a fixed attitude.
#8
Quote by Ikonoklast
It's an absolutely pointless exercise. Guitar is merely a medium for practicing and playing music on. There is absolutely zero musicality in running scales. Use them as a warm up, use the rest of your practice time learning how to apply them.

+1

it's a complete waste of time, effort and a guitar.

Learn to play music and lose the daft notion that fast automatically equates to good. Speed is the least important aspect of guitar playing and something you shouldn't concern yourself with - because f you do everything else right it will take care of itself.

As far as the major scale goes learn how it sounds, learn how it's constructed, learn how to harmonise it and the chords derived from it , learn how to find it on the guitar, learn how to play it in every key and ultimately learn how to use it - how fast you can play it is irrelevant.

Guitar isn't a sport - I know people tend to have a compulsion to find some empirical way to "measure" their progress, and speed is really the only thing you can attach a definite number to but it's all bollocks.
Actually called Mark!

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Last edited by steven seagull at Oct 6, 2009,
#9
Quote by steven seagull
+1

it's a complete waste of time, effort and a guitar.

Learn to play music and lose the daft notion that fast automatically equates to good. Speed is the least important aspect of guitar playing and something you shouldn't concern yourself with - because f you do everything else right it will take care of itself.

As far as the major scale goes learn how it sounds, learn how it's constructed, learn how to harmonise it and the chords derived from it , learn how to find it on the guitar, learn how to play it in every key and ultimately learn how to use it - how fast you can play it is irrelevant.

Guitar isn't a sport - I know people tend to have a compulsion to find some empirical way to "measure" their progress, and speed is really the only thing you can attach a definite number to but it's all bollocks.


always seems to me that ur one of the few persons who would come with helpful comments rather than "this post is pointless"
#10
also learning how to use scales is bollocks, because your ear will gradually learn how to play over a chord progression
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#11
Quote by 08L1V10N
also learning how to use scales is bollocks, because your ear will gradually learn how to play over a chord progression


You really have no clue do you?

Understanding scales goes a long way to helping you train your ear, everything ties in together.
Actually called Mark!

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...it's a seagull

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i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


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#12
160BPM quarter notes, eighth notes, sixteenth??? just 160 notes in a minute isn't hard, give it a few weeks of good practice and you can do it, make sure it's clean sounding though
#13
Quote by steven seagull
+1

it's a complete waste of time, effort and a guitar.

Learn to play music and lose the daft notion that fast automatically equates to good. Speed is the least important aspect of guitar playing and something you shouldn't concern yourself with - because f you do everything else right it will take care of itself.

As far as the major scale goes learn how it sounds, learn how it's constructed, learn how to harmonise it and the chords derived from it , learn how to find it on the guitar, learn how to play it in every key and ultimately learn how to use it - how fast you can play it is irrelevant.

Guitar isn't a sport - I know people tend to have a compulsion to find some empirical way to "measure" their progress, and speed is really the only thing you can attach a definite number to but it's all bollocks.


I wish i'd got that into my head everytime you posted that in a thread, but I think you've got to work it out for yourself rather than just take someone's word for it. You can create the same feel at eighth notes as zakk wylde at 16ths