#1
a baritone guitar like in breaking benjamin and just a regular elctric guitar???
S.D.M.F.
Words Can Be Broken...So Can Bones


........................
#3
Longer scale. "Regular" electric guitars usually have a 24.75" or 25.5" scale. Baritone guitars have a scale of 27" or longer. It makes for better intonation when tuning down.
Quote by lizarday
oh yeah? well larry king the slayer guitarist owns bc rich guitars. (i think)
#4
scale?? as in neck size??? another dumb question
S.D.M.F.
Words Can Be Broken...So Can Bones


........................
#6
Quote by Metro Gnome
Yes. How long the neck is


NO

it`s measured between the contact point on the saddle and the contact point on the nut, by contact point i`m referring to the point where the string makes contact with them.
#8
Quote by ibanezgod1973
NO

it`s measured between the contact point on the saddle and the contact point on the nut, by contact point i`m referring to the point where the string makes contact with them.

This. But this usually results in a longer neck as well.
Quote by lizarday
oh yeah? well larry king the slayer guitarist owns bc rich guitars. (i think)
#9
ok thanks guys. i was just wondering
S.D.M.F.
Words Can Be Broken...So Can Bones


........................
#10
It's not necessarily a deeper sound. You can tune a baritone to standard tuning. The longer scale length would actually make it brighter than a regular guitar. The scale length is the only difference. The neck isn't necessarily longer. Scale length is the distance between the nut and saddle. The reason they were invented was to add tension to down-tuned guitars. But some people like Buckethead just prefer the extended scale.
#11
Quote by ibanezgod1973
NO

it`s measured between the contact point on the saddle and the contact point on the nut, by contact point i`m referring to the point where the string makes contact with them.



Correct me if I´m wrong... but having a long scale is also directly related to the spacing of the frets being larger... thus a longer neck? Disregarding fret count, of course.
#12
Quote by Vlasco
Correct me if I´m wrong... but having a long scale is also directly related to the spacing of the frets being larger... thus a longer neck? Disregarding fret count, of course.

???? lol
S.D.M.F.
Words Can Be Broken...So Can Bones


........................
#13
Quote by Vlasco
Correct me if I´m wrong... but having a long scale is also directly related to the spacing of the frets being larger... thus a longer neck? Disregarding fret count, of course.

Yeah you're right.

Basically, a baritone (Usually from 27" to 29" or so) scale length will allow for more string tension, allowing you to droptune lower than a standard, and still maintain tight strings. When tuned to standard, you get a very crisp tight sound, which I actually really like.
#14
It´s just that the other guy was right in saying what the scale length is... but for practical purposes saying it is the length of the neck also works. I suppose its a matter of specific definition vs the effect of said definition.
Last edited by Vlasco at Oct 6, 2009,