#1
My singer is having trouble trying to understand something that I find very simple

My band is about ready to record, but we're a few songs short of an album, and some of songs (I'll just say Set A) don't go with the others (Set B).
Set A is mainly more poppier punk sounding songs, while Set B contains songs more rock-metal like songs. Set B are also much better in terms of writing.

The singer seems to think that this is a stupid idea, I was just wondering if I could get an outside opinion on this.

Should we do an EP and later, when ready, do an album? Or should we just do the album with everything we have now?
(\__/)
(='.'=)Help the Bunny
(")_(")
#2
I'd do the EP first. If your band is having a hard time understanding the difference in length between the two, then you guys obviously have little to no studio experience. Recording a full length album will take too long and you'll never get it completed.

In relation to what songs to record on the EP, make it 4-5 of your best songs, which the band can agree upon. No covers (unless you're a cover band).
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#3
Quote by AlanHB
I'd do the EP first. If your band is having a hard time understanding the difference in length between the two, then you guys obviously have little to no studio experience. Recording a full length album will take too long and you'll never get it completed.

In relation to what songs to record on the EP, make it 4-5 of your best songs, which the band can agree upon. No covers (unless you're a cover band).



This is pretty much right.

It makes more sense to start with an EP anyway, as recording an album is an expensive process, never mind actually producing it. An EP will be a little bit cheaper, and it will give you the experience to go in and record an album at a later date and know what to expect.

Also, if you do go with a 4-5 track EP, if you are ever handing material into venues, dont just go with a copy of the EP, hand in a promotion pack
- large padded envelope
- pictures of the band
- short bio of the band
- copy of the EP + 2 track demo. The reasoning behind this, is that noone has time to sit down and listen to the full five tracks, so you give them a seperate CD with your 2 best, and if they like those, they will listen to the EP.

Also, to help explain to your singer it goes

single -> EP -> LP -> Album
#4
Quote by jimmy_neutron

Also, to help explain to your singer it goes

single -> EP -> LP -> Album


Wat? How does an LP differ from an album?
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#5
No point in putting a bunch of filler songs on an album. You need you catch people's attention. Go for the EP.
#6
The 'EP' has become a bullsh1t concept lately. Unless you're releasing it on a label or widely distributing it in some way it's just a bloody demo, okay?
So many bands these days are more concerned about looking and acting like they're in the music business than actually getting the music right. Bands like to talk the talk, and the most common thing I hear is 'we're releasing an EP'.
But what does that mean? You're not 'releasing' it anywhere, it's just a shoddy 4-6 track demo you might burn on CD-Rs and sell to a few mates, or put on Myspace.


Self-financing an album is very expensive, so don't do it 'just for fun'. Even an 'EP' is five or six tracks, so for good quality you'll need a few hundred dollars. You can maybe sell them to your mates and family for $4 a pop. But if you're not a great band and the recording quality is poor, the few you actually sell will never be listened to, except as a novelty.


Unless your band is either well known enough to recoup all the recording expenses selling CDs (we're talking a bare minimum of $1000 for an album worth listening to), just do a a cheap demo of two or three tracks.
Put a budget aside of about $100 - $200 for the recording, focusing on high quality not amount of songs, and sell the demo online (call it a maxi-single or an EP if you're really that pretentious) for $2.50.


Unless you're signed, or have a big following (we're talking hundreds of genuine fans here) concentrate on getting a few good songs, recorded well - not 60 minutes of badly-recorded sh1te no-one will ever listen to.
Last edited by kyle62 at Oct 7, 2009,
#7
Quote by AlanHB
Wat? How does an LP differ from an album?



I cant rememeber the exact times, but there is a certain time limit for each one.

EDIT: Taken From Wikipedia

Usually, a CD single has around 10–28 minutes of music, an EP has up to 36 minutes, and an album generally has 30–80 minutes. Mini-LPs generally contain 20–30 minutes of music.[1] In the United Kingdom, the Official Chart Company defines a cut off between EP and album classification at 25 minutes length or four tracks (plus alternative versions of featured songs)
#8
Quote by jimmy_neutron
I cant rememeber the exact times, but there is a certain time limit for each one.

EDIT: Taken From Wikipedia

Usually, a CD single has around 10–28 minutes of music, an EP has up to 36 minutes, and an album generally has 30–80 minutes. Mini-LPs generally contain 20–30 minutes of music.[1] In the United Kingdom, the Official Chart Company defines a cut off between EP and album classification at 25 minutes length or four tracks (plus alternative versions of featured songs)


EP and LP traditionally refer to different sizes of vinyl records. You've seen them. The small one is an EP (Extended Play), the bigger one is the LP (Long Play). Singles were released as EPs, they were about 20 minutes long. Full length albums were released as LPs, and they went for about 48 mins. Sometimes there would be double-albums released, and they took up 2 LPs.

I think it can be assumed that LPs are synonymous with albums. EPs are generally not associated with singles, as they are not released to promote a specific song, but rather released to promote a band who has not released an album.

To the guy above who said that EPs are synonymous with "Demo Tape", that is not the case. EPs are meant to be professional sounding recordings, a "short album" if you will. A demo tape is what it sounds like, a demo, and not representative of the final recorded product. I'll purchase an EP if I like the band to support them. They don't sound like home recorded demos at all, and they aren't.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#9
I'd say put in your EP/demo either 3 or 5 songs. Make it a demo or a short album. 4 just feels awkward. Almost to the point if you're going to record 4 songs, why not do one more? A quality 5 song EP will run you $1000 for mixing/mastering. ($100/song mixing, $100/ song mastering). You can get away with cheaper and still sound pretty good. Definitely save the money and go for QUALITY over quantity. An awesome sounding 3 song demo will be listened to way more often than a so-so sounding 5 song cd. It will in turn have your fans wanting more, AND you'll come across as a band who has their sh#t together. The only way you can get away with a crap quality recording is with just a single acoustic guitar and vocalist. IF that.


so......re-reading.....lol basically what Kyle said lol

wiki :

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Extended_play
#10
Just to clarify, a demo is acceptable to give to a pub for work, but not to sell to a crowd.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#11
Quote by kyle62
all the recording expenses selling CDs (we're talking a bare minimum of $1000 for an album worth listening to),


We spent $1000 on manufacturing alone for 500 copies. (jewel case, artwork insert, printed discs (not just printed labels), shrink wrap, bar code). It was worth it, though, because packaging is one of the things that the consumer uses to distinguish between a pro product and a home-made (inferred second-rate) demo CD.

We paid an artist $50 to come up with a concept for the artwork. That's pretty cheap.

The good news for us is that we recorded our album at my place, so it didn't cost us anything. (you know.... once the $1000's of gear was purchased.... and 100's of hours reading and practicing recording, etc.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#12
Its costing my band near on $2000 to record the 5 tracks that we want to do

And thats before and CD duplication, cases, artwork, launch etc etc
#13
We've already made two demos recording with Garageband software. We've made some friends with people and are able to get recording and mastering done for very cheaply, but good quality.

The only thing that now concerns me, now that it's been brought up, is the packaging like axemanchris mentioned.
(\__/)
(='.'=)Help the Bunny
(")_(")
#14
Be careful, though. Good software does not make good recordings. Good software helps you manipulate good recordings.

Good recordings are made with good mics, good preamps, and a good knowledge of how to use those things. For instance, where you put a mic can have a huge effect on how the end result will sound. You've got to know, for instance, what kind of difference it will make if you mic a tom near the center of the head vs. near the outside of the head vs half way in between the two..... or how it will make a difference if the mic is pointing straight down at the head vs placing it near the rim and pointing it inwards towards the center of the head at 45 degrees. Those things can make major differences, and an inexperienced person with great software is not likely to know that. That inexperienced person with great software is also not likely to know things like how a tight cardiod pattern on a dynamic mic will sound different from a small-diaphragm omni condensor.... or wouldn't know how that same condensor mic behaves differently than a large diaphragm condensor. These are all things that impact your recordings much moreso than having great software.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#15
^I know this, which is why we're going for actual studio time
when we did our demos we recorded all the instruments live then added vocals, which was fine for a demo I guess, but the vocals came in much clearer then the instruments

EDIT: I don't mean to sound like a jerk by saying "I know this", I don't know specific details, just how important mic placement is when recording.
(\__/)
(='.'=)Help the Bunny
(")_(")
Last edited by mybandsuks_15 at Oct 8, 2009,