#1
I'm starting to learn scales and it's going faster then I expected, after giving it a serious try.

The only thing I never understood was the way they're used in songs. Say you're playing a scale, do you stay in this scale or do you play other ones? If you play multiple scales, then you would follow the chord progression me thinks? And is it about experimentation(figuring out what sounds good over what chord)?

Also, concerning keys, I suppose they have a big impact on the scales you would want to play in. So would experimentation be the only way to figure out what sounds good(like you want)? And hum I figure that the key a song is simply is the root of your chord progression, am I right?

I've always been lost on this subject so could you guys please enlighten me? Sorry about the noobness .
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#2
scales, you can play whatever scale you damn well please.. you can follow one scale a whole song, or you can play a different variation of it during like a solo..

and a key signature isnt the root of a chord progression. "In principle, any piece can be written with any key signature. Using sharps and flats to correct any notes where it shouldn't apply. The purpose is to minimize the number of such accidentals required to notate the music."
#3
So basicly the only "limit" you have is experience/experimentation. But when you say you can play whatever scale you please, you do mean that you could say go from Am to C, if it sounds good?

And about the key, I think I get it now. Simply said, the key signature is merely a tool to "simplify" a song.
Quote by MH400
a girl on the interwebz?

You have 2 options.

1. Tits.
2. GTFO.

#4
This v is how you usually define a scale in sheet music. The "natural" notes you can place in the lines and spaces are the notes IN the scale and they are supposed to sound nicely together, other notes outside the scale sound weird and must not be overused. Scale changes are not too common.



NOTE: I'm an idiot. Somebody correct me please.
#5
Quote by Spike6sic6
So basicly the only "limit" you have is experience/experimentation. But when you say you can play whatever scale you please, you do mean that you could say go from Am to C, if it sounds good?

And about the key, I think I get it now. Simply said, the key signature is merely a tool to "simplify" a song.


take a key signature as a guideline, not as to what you can and cant do, but just things you can do that will sound good. and things that arent in the key, will most likely not sound good. but theres nothing to say that you can't work with notes, chords, uncommon to that particular key.

let's look at the key of C major and the C major scale ok.. the C major scale is the only major scale that doesnt use sharps or flats. CDEFGAB .. okay. now with those notes, you can assemble certain chords with those notes.. (C major, G major, D minor, A minor, E minor, F major..etc).. knowing that.. when you want to go and make chord progressions, you do it WITHIN THE KEY... get it?

****.. you can take those chords i just listed and make a song out of it, and it will sound good. now say you actually did that, you would by default play a melody with the C major Scale.. now say in writing your melody, maybe you like an F# thrown somewhere in there.. an F# is not a part of the C major scale, but maybe an F# at a certain point in the song will sound cool. its something you mess around with.
#6
Quote by Spike6sic6
So basicly the only "limit" you have is experience/experimentation. But when you say you can play whatever scale you please, you do mean that you could say go from Am to C, if it sounds good?

And about the key, I think I get it now. Simply said, the key signature is merely a tool to "simplify" a song.

You can't do that particular example no, because those scales both contain the same notes - the chords your playing over will determine what scale those notes are regardless of shapes, patterns or where you play them. If your progression resolves to C then the notes C D E F G A B will be C major scale regardless of how you use or arrange them, likewise if it resolves to Am then they're going to be the A minor scale.

What you can do is look at the chords you're playing over and see any of the parallel modes wil fit, for example modulating between the parallel major and minor (eg A minor to A major) is a relatively common trick in blues and jazz. However you can't swich between the relative major and minor (eg C major to A minor) unless you change the arrangement of the chords you're playing over - however despite this fact you'll find countless ill-informed people telling you you can throughout your guitar playing life.

Generally you'll use a single scale throughout a song. However the thing you should not forget is that the notes that don't appear in the scale are equally valid, they still perform a function within that scale. They usually won't sound very consonant but that's something you can use to your advantage, moving away from scale tones to create tension. Your scale is the framework and that's what you'll spend most of the time in, but you can happily use chord tones, chromatic steps and downright odd notes provided they're going to give you the sound you want.
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