#1
So Pit, I'm pretty sure there are some athletic people out there

So yeah on the 24th I'm going hiking at the Grand Canyon. Bright Angel trail to be exact. I've been hiking many times but this is the Grand Canyon and I want to know what parts of my body I should specifically train. If any of you have hiked this trail or any trail at the Grand Canyon would you tell me how it was?

Thanks in advance
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#2
Legs, arms, body and mind.
There is a war going on for your mind.

If you are thinking, you are winning.


Resistance is victory.


We are building up a new world.
Do not sit idly by.
#3
Soo jealous.....hiking that area next year tho.

Train your endurance, and cardio. also, bring lotsa water or a good filter system ( if you can find any)
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#4
lol i'll probably bring like 5 gallons of water
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#5
Lol you're the one carrying it....unless you get a mule, or strong person.
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#6
i hiked around the south rim of the grand canyon and took a "shortcut" through the desert a few years ago. its mostly a mental thing and bring lots of water
#7
What distance are you hiking?

Anywho, the best training for hiking is, well, hiking. Also, probably distance running.

More important than training your body I think, since you've gone on hikes before, is make sure to take care of your feet. Wear good shoes/boots that are designed for the task, bring changes of socks, keep them dry, etc etc. Your feet will suffer more wear than the rest of your body. Subsequently, the proper shoes and care of your feet will also improve the care of your entire legs and the joints and tendons contained therein.

Just out of curiosity, what shoes/boots will you be using?
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#8
You gotta have Second Skin, for blisters. I don't know about mosquitoes, I'm guessing not much :P.
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#9
Quote by Dreadnought
What distance are you hiking?

Anywho, the best training for hiking is, well, hiking. Also, probably distance running.

Agreed. Nothing like hiking to train for a hike.
More important than training your body I think, since you've gone on hikes before, is make sure to take care of your feet. Wear good shoes/boots that are designed for the task, bring changes of socks, keep them dry, etc etc. Your feet will suffer more wear than the rest of your body. Subsequently, the proper shoes and care of your feet will also improve the care of your entire legs and the joints and tendons contained therein.

Agree with this as well, with an addition:

The material of the socks you wear is very important. Don't just wear cotton athletic socks. They will get soaked with sweat fast and won't dry out. Go for a wool blend (usually merino wool) or some synthetic material (CoolMax or something along those lines is very popular and functional). SmartWool is probably the best hiking sock going, but there are others out there that are just as good. If you're prone to blisters, you can sock liners to wear inside your hiking socks, so that the hiking socks won't be rubbing against your skin.

If you're buying new boots for the trip, wear them around for a week or so before your trip -- and I mean everywhere -- to break them in.
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#10
Quote by Dreadnought

What distance are you hiking?

Anywho, the best training for hiking is, well, hiking. Also, probably distance running.

Just out of curiosity, what shoes/boots will you be using?


Well it all depends because I'm going with some friends and sometimes they slow me down and sometimes the don't

As for the shoes/boots I'm going to take I'm currently looking for some right now.
Any suggestions?


Quote by arsonite

Lol you're the one carrying it....unless you get a mule, or strong person


haha well I'm going hiking with like 8 or 10 other people so we'll distrbute the water among all of us.

Quote by Dirk Gently

Agree with this as well, with an addition:

SmartWool is probably the best hiking sock going, but there are others out there that are just as good. If you're prone to blisters, you can sock liners to wear inside your hiking socks, so that the hiking socks won't be rubbing against your skin.

If you're buying new boots for the trip, wear them around for a week or so before your trip -- and I mean everywhere -- to break them in.


Thanks for the advice.
I'll be sure to wear in the new boots I get.
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#11
^ If you have an REI or some other outdoor specialty store around, check them out. They have people called pedorthists who are trained to fit shoes to people. They also usually have ramps for you to stand on, so you can feel how the boot fits when you're climbing or descending.

You also have to figure out how much weight you're carrying with you. If it's just you and a small school-sized backpack, then you'd be fine with a pair of trail running or low-top hiking shoes, such as the Merrell Chameleon series, or a mid-height boot. If you're carrying any significant weight, go with a mid or high top for ankle support. The more weight or technical the hiking, the taller the boot should be.

Prices usually go from $100-250 for a good boot, depending on whether you want waterproofing, GoreTex, etc. Some of the better brands are Asolo, Merrell, Vasque, Keen, and Zamberlan.
Hi, I'm Peter
#13
Quote by Dirk Gently
^ If you have an REI or some other outdoor specialty store around, check them out. They have people called pedorthists who are trained to fit shoes to people. They also usually have ramps for you to stand on, so you can feel how the boot fits when you're climbing or descending.

You also have to figure out how much weight you're carrying with you. If it's just you and a small school-sized backpack, then you'd be fine with a pair of trail running or low-top hiking shoes, such as the Merrell Chameleon series, or a mid-height boot. If you're carrying any significant weight, go with a mid or high top for ankle support. The more weight or technical the hiking, the taller the boot should be.

Prices usually go from $100-250 for a good boot, depending on whether you want waterproofing, GoreTex, etc. Some of the better brands are Asolo, Merrell, Vasque, Keen, and Zamberlan.


The most popular civilian boot I see guys wearing here are the Asolo Fugitives. I don't particularly like them, as they have a really skinny sole at the heel.

I personally recommend Salomon Quest 4D GTX, which yes I do wear , but they've received outstanding reviews across the board and are extremely well liked. Check out reviews online. They cost about 220/240 from REI. I had to drive to Seattle to get mine, but they've treated me well so far. Done lots of training which involved running and carrying a heavy load and they've held up great in all terrains. Also did a 3 mile kit run today in them on street, and they felt fine.
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