#1
Hey guys, I know I'm kind of going into a weird "personal preference" area, but I was wondering what characteristics are defined in a lead channel vs. rhtyhm.

For example, on my standard (what I call rhythm) I tend to scoop my mids for a chunkier sound. What or how should the EQ be setup for the lead channel in order to have it stand out from the rhythm. Besides doing a volume boost (thats a no brainer).

Or is this, like a mentioned, personal prefernce? I read somewhere (non-reputable source) that Eddie Van Halen had his rythm channel EQ was a "smiley face" and his lead a "frowny face". Silly, I know, but it makes sense in my head. Could anyone give me some insight?
Axes
Peavey V-Type NTB ST
Peavey PXD 23 II
Jackson JS32T
Ibanez RG 1570
Epiphone Les Paul Standard Blue Royale
ESP LTD EX-50

Amps & Effects
Mesa Boogie Nomad 55
Boss Katana KTN-Head
Roland JC-120
Boss GT-100
Boss ME-80
Zoom G5
#2
what do you mean by a "smiley" and "frowny" face?
Originally posted by PedroLesPaulVM
"My guitar is always in tune because all the tuning heads face the same way."


LOL
#3
Just the way his EQ settings physically looked liked
Axes
Peavey V-Type NTB ST
Peavey PXD 23 II
Jackson JS32T
Ibanez RG 1570
Epiphone Les Paul Standard Blue Royale
ESP LTD EX-50

Amps & Effects
Mesa Boogie Nomad 55
Boss Katana KTN-Head
Roland JC-120
Boss GT-100
Boss ME-80
Zoom G5
#4
Well "scooping" mids will make you blend in with the band, more mids and your sound stands out from the band, so that might be what you are talking about. BTW that is science not opinion.

James
#5
But if you are playing by yourself more mids make a quackier honkier sound, one of those things that you get by playing with others.

James
#6
That does make sense, but Im wondering if there's anything else that needs to be altered. In the previous band I was in, I loved scooping my mids ALL the time with reckless disregard to any form of lead channel. The other guitar player loved boosting his mids, so he always cut through my sound. However, if he played by himself, his sound was relatively weak sounding. I needed more a more brutal sound but Im realizng I need to round out my sound more
Axes
Peavey V-Type NTB ST
Peavey PXD 23 II
Jackson JS32T
Ibanez RG 1570
Epiphone Les Paul Standard Blue Royale
ESP LTD EX-50

Amps & Effects
Mesa Boogie Nomad 55
Boss Katana KTN-Head
Roland JC-120
Boss GT-100
Boss ME-80
Zoom G5
#7
Don't ask me I'm an Acoustic/Telecaster player, you couldn't scoop my Tele if you wanted to...
Just thought I'd pass on the science... So in practice, well just buy a 30 pack of beer, invite a bassist and guitarist over, and make some noise, that's how the rock stars do it.

James
#8
I'm assuming you play metal as you're talking about scooped mids. As a metal player: personally I hate scooped mids, it sounds really bad to my ear. The guitar is a midrange instrument and scooping the mids is essentially raping your sound.
Anyway, I like to use:
On my EQ pedal:
high mids (around 4 o clock), high treble (around 1 or 2 o clock), slight bass cut (about 11 o clock)
On my amp: mids at 2 o clock, bass at 2 o clock and treble at 1 o clock

I use pretty much the same settings no matter whether I'm playing leads or rhythms but the rhythm guitarist in my band uses less mids and treble than I do but more bass.
Speed is a by-product of shut the fuck up.
#9
For god's sake don't scoop your mids. You tone will sound horrible. D: