#1
He's an amazing musician, and I find the chords he uses really stand out. Unsure whether this is due to context (most likely) but does anyone know what ones he likes to adhere to, maybe some unusual chords I might not know about?

Cheers I can give examples if necessary, but might take a bit of rooting around
#2
you should experiment with chords involving semi-tone intervals that will ring out together.

|-
|-0---\
|-5---/
|-7
|-0
|-

|-2
|-3
|-0----\
|-4----/
|-2
|-

the easiest way of doing this is by using open strings

edit: semi-tone intervals marked.
Last edited by MapOfYourHead at Oct 7, 2009,
#4
I'm really liking the sound of these, especially the semi tone ones. Is there any particular formula to make this, such as with the typical major and minor chords. Or would I just go about forming chords from scales that have that semi tone interval?
#5
well i use the chord construction theory that i know to make the chords.

for example, in the key of E minor the 2nd and b3rd degrees are a semi-tone tone apart, the 2nd is an F# and the b3 is a G.

in standard tuning the 3rd string is a G, so there's one thing i dont have to worry about. now to get that sound, i want the 2nd degree within the same octave, knowing the notes of the fretboard i know that it can be fretted on the 4th string 4th fret.

|-
|-
|-0
|-4
|-
|-

i know that the key is E minor and i know that ive used the 2nd and b3rd, so for simplicitys sake i can say that im using some form of E minor chord (Em uses E,G,B) and the 2nd degree can be called the 9th because its above the roots octave.

the formula for a Em9 chord is 1-b3-5-b7-9, im not using the 7th so i can say thats its an Em add9.

Em--Em(add9)
|-
|-
|-0----0
|-2----4
|-2----2
|-0----0

and there you have your semi-tone interval within a chord that will fit into the key of E minor.

/an answer that you probably didnt want
#6
No that's EXACTLY what I wanted! It's some complicated theory for me but I'll try to get my head round it. Very interesting stuff.

I got guitar help from merry (or pippin) hurrah!
#7
Quote by MapOfYourHead
well i use the chord construction theory that i know to make the chords.

for example, in the key of E minor the 2nd and b3rd degrees are a semi-tone tone apart, the 2nd is an F# and the b3 is a G.

in standard tuning the 3rd string is a G, so there's one thing i dont have to worry about. now to get that sound, i want the 2nd degree within the same octave, knowing the notes of the fretboard i know that it can be fretted on the 4th string 4th fret.

|-
|-
|-0
|-4
|-
|-

i know that the key is E minor and i know that ive used the 2nd and b3rd, so for simplicitys sake i can say that im using some form of E minor chord (Em uses E,G,B) and the 2nd degree can be called the 9th because its above the roots octave.

the formula for a Em9 chord is 1-b3-5-b7-9, im not using the 7th so i can say thats its an Em add9.

Em--Em(add9)
|-
|-
|-0----0
|-2----4
|-2----2
|-0----0

and there you have your semi-tone interval within a chord that will fit into the key of E minor.

/an answer that you probably didnt want
Emadd9 is definitely my favorite chord ever.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#8
Quote by food1010
Emadd9 is definitely my favorite chord ever.


try adding

e|-5-
b|-3-

to it
#9
Quote by Tallman
try adding

e|-5-
b|-3-

to it


I also like

2
3
0
0
2
0

while throwing in the 4th fret d string (f#) a little here and there.
#10
THERES afew pos. on the fret board that they use . Like each different chord from the open pos. up you can work mirracles with LAGGATTO which can lead into racking always think there is another pos. for this chord and style of playing it!!