#1
My singer is pretty good at singing, and his voice really suits the music we play. But sometimes when working on a song, I want to put a harmony with the vocals. Thing is, I'm not very good at singing (my voice sounds bad, it goes out of tune, and it sounds held back). So, should I work on my singing to get it in tune and more powerful, or just get a harmony pedal?
#4
Quote by innertom
go get some singing lessons

I actually had some singing lessons, but those don't really change how my voice sounds. Maybe if I was able to record a whole song, mix it, and have my vocals in the backing vocals, it would work, but I know for lead singing my voice just sounds like crap. I think I could work on the pitch myself.
#5
Don't even bother with a harmony pedal. Very limited way to harmonize. Just learn to sing a little. If you're just doing backing vocals, it's not that difficult.
#6
If your singing lessons didn't help you, it was because you didn't have the patience to continue them longer, nor the dedication to practice at home.

Try harder.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#7
Quote by AlanHB
If your singing lessons didn't help you, it was because you didn't have the patience to continue them longer, nor the dedication to practice at home.

Try harder.

Well, they helped, but that was about 3 or so years ago. Since then I've hit puberty and stopped singing as much because of the sound of my voice.
#8
Quote by Alex Vik
Well, they helped, but that was about 3 or so years ago. Since then I've hit puberty and stopped singing as much because of the sound of my voice.
My suggestion is that you get singing lessons. It will help virtually everything about your singing, including your tone.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#9
Okay, we have two things going on here.... at least.

1. Puberty. Ain't it a b!tch, eh? You just start getting comfortable with the voice you've had since you were born and BAM!! Someone comes in, cuts off the hydro, and moves all the furniture around when you're not looking. Haha. So, you're getting used to how your voice feels, and it also sounds different. To you, it sounds strange. That's okay. It's only because it's new and you haven't grown into it yet. You will.

2. Singing lessons: If you are learning proper technique, the sound of your voice *should* change. Not change like Lou Reed suddenly sounding like Robert Plant, but change as in plugging a Les Paul into an off-brand 20W amp, and then plugging it into a handwired vintage Marshall. Yeah, still sounds like a Les Paul either way, but the tone is day and night. If your voice didn't change like that, you either had a bad teacher, had a teacher who didn't teach you technique, or for whatever reason, they did teach you technique, but you just didn't learn it. (not long enough, whatever....)

As someone who resisted singing (always said, "what's the point? I can't do it. I'm just awful, and besides, I'm a guitarist. Singing will never help me." ), I will tell you that learning to sing is one of the best things *any* musician can learn to do. You become a much more desired prospect when it comes to auditions ("...yeah, I can do backing vocals no problem"), your ear will get significantly better, and you will be able to communicate your ideas better.

I'd say go back and resume those lessons, or find a teacher who will teach you technique. Lots of teachers just do repertoire. Kinda pointless, if you ask me.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.