#1
For a school project i'm expressing the youth movements of the 50's and 60's through song. My biggest challenge is being able to accurately express the changes in musical styles between the 50's and 60's. If anyone could give me examples of iconic songs and guitar techniques that express the attitude of the youth from each era I would be very thankful. I won't be completely copying their songs but using similar styles and song structures.

Thanks guys

Ideas so far:

50's: Bo Diddley, Chuck Berry

60's: Beatles, Hendrix, Clapton, Bob Dylan
Schecter C-1 Classic Raven RG20 + Digitech RP50


Man, I could go for a 7 right now...
Last edited by leftyace at Oct 8, 2009,
#2
How about you feature some Horribly sweet mid-1950's pop, then progress through some late 50's rock n' roll & country, Some early beatles riffs, some kinks, MC5 then end with a bit of The Jimmy Hendrix Experience.

So you're going from a time when the record label was in control through to when the artist was getting more power/starting to do more ground breaking stuff.
Yeah, now you're gonna die wearing that stupid little hat. How does it feel?

Help me to live.


I make custom guitar wiring harnesses and I'm pretty damn good at it!
#3
Quote by flyingmarlin
How about you feature some Horribly sweet mid-1950's pop, then progress through some late 50's rock n' roll & country, Some early beatles riffs, some kinks, MC5 then end with a bit of The Jimmy Hendrix Experience.

So you're going from a time when the record label was in control through to when the artist was getting more power/starting to do more ground breaking stuff.

Thanks, this is exactly what i was hoping to hear. I knew that for the 60's i would do Beatles and Hendrix influenced sounds but im really lost on what I could play on guitar for the 50's. Any artists you can think of that represent the conformity of the mid 50's?
Schecter C-1 Classic Raven RG20 + Digitech RP50


Man, I could go for a 7 right now...
#4
Quote by flyingmarlin
How about you feature some Horribly sweet mid-1950's pop, then progress through some late 50's rock n' roll & country, Some early beatles riffs, some kinks, MC5 then end with a bit of The Jimmy Hendrix Experience.

So you're going from a time when the record label was in control through to when the artist was getting more power/starting to do more ground breaking stuff.


That's a good idea to do, try to get some blues in there too if possible...

About the last sentence, record labels did lose their control for a while, and a lot of great music has been made, now we're actually back to square one and record labels have got the power again more in pop than anywhere else, and where has all the good music gone?

Sorry about that, that was just general thinking...

For horribly sweet pop from the late '50s, you could try Roy Orbison and the likes of him... It's all basically the same anyway
Gear:
Fender Jazzmaster
Boss DS-2
Digitech RP150 (with Line6 EX-1 Exp pedal)
Orange Crush 30R


My Youtube Page
Read this!You know you really want to...

Last edited by poipoi at Oct 8, 2009,
#5
theres the definite leap from the Elvis and Link Wray type rock n roll to the experimental rock/folk fusion that peaked at the end of the 60s. basically had relatively square, although jazz-influenced rock, which went with the twist and other dances. then in the 60s, they injected folk and experimented with what kind of sounds they could make. i mean you had the first electric keyboards being thrown in there (The Doors) and you had guitar technique innovation (Jimi Hendrix). music in the 60s was less about specific dances or anything like that, and more about blowing your mind.

thats just my first thoughts on the topic. look up some of the stuff Grace Slick says about the 60s, she seems to describe it rather well. im afraid i dont know too much about the 50s, not a big fan. jazz, blues and big band were kinda hijacked and made into square, teeny bopper friendly pop, and i think this movement became supersaturated in the 50s. rock n roll was born out of this, and people in the 60s simply took rock n roll and pushed it in another direction.
#7
Why not start with Les Paul's jazz influenced stuff, through Elvis and Bill Haley (Rock Around the Clock solo) then Chuck Berry and Buddy Holly. The transition in guitar styles came with Duane Eddy or The Shadows in UK, paving the way for The Beatles etc. Don't forget the influence of Jeff Beck and Peter Green on late 60's while US guitar seemed in a bit of a slump.
I pick up my guitar and play
Just like Yesterday

T C Ellis Series 2 LP w/Skatterbrane Quiescence pups
Cort EVL-K6
Yamaha RGX211 modded
H&S Electric 12-string
Shaftsbury Ricki 4001
'84 Fender Yale
Roland Cube 15x