#1
I was looking through the FR guide to set up a tremolo (Edge III) but to be honest, it got too confusing and thought I'd just ask for help.

I have a guitar currently set up to Drop C tuning, I want to be able to move it from Drop C to Standard D# to Drop B, etc.

What exactly do I have to mess with, can anyone point out which parts of the Setup Guide I should have a closer look at, maybe give me some specific details?

Thanks alot.
Poop.


Yes, poop.
#2
if your going to be repeatedly switching tunings all the time your going to need to get a hardtail, particularly in a live situation you`ll spend more time setting up the guitar than playing it, get it setup for your highest tuning (Eb not D#, yes the ar enharmonic but it`s PC to call it Eb) then going lower will not be adding tension on the neck and wil just require the bridge to be levelled parrallel to the body,
#3
I agree with ibanezgod. Get a hardtail if you want to change tunings so much.

Everytime you go to a different tuning you have to adjust the springs or that screw in the cavity to compensate for the different tension that the new tuning will have. If you don't and just unscrew the locking tuners and tune down, then the decrease in tension will cause your trem to pull up and you will only be able to push the bar downwards. And the opposite goes for tuning up to Eb standard from Drop C. The trem will be so far down that you will only be able to pull it up.

I'd just pick a tuning and stick with it or get a hardtail.
Last edited by MicahChaney at Oct 8, 2009,
#4
This Isn't for a live situation, this is just me at home, and yes, ive thought about getting a hardtail, and i want to, but i dont have the money right now, so Id like to know how and what to adjust to get my guitar from tuning to tuning.
Poop.


Yes, poop.
#5
Potentially Large post Alert.

Whenever you go to a lower tuning, you will need to remove tension from the spring in the back, whenever you go to a higher tension you will need to add tension.

Here's why. In order for the Floating trem to work, (Stay in tune, no matter what.) The tension of the springs, needs to equal the tension of the strings, because when they are equal, you can do whatever you want with the trem, and it will always come back to the same spot, thus, it stays in tune. The simplest way to see if their tensions are equal is this: The tensions are equal when the bridge is parallel to the body.

Here's a step by step "How to Change Floating trems Tuning"...

1. Unlock the first nut clamp. (The one holding the lowest {in pitch} String).

2. Now, Tune that Lowest (in pitch) string to whatever it needs to be (i.e. D, C#, Bb, whatever. {Don't worry about the other strings right now.}) Now depending on whatever tuning you are already in you will need to add or remove tension from the springs. ( If you're going from a higher to lower tuning, you'll need to remove tension. Lower to Higher, Add It.)

(Be sure that re-lock the nut clamp every time you tune with the Main tuners.)


3. Now, when you add/remove tension from the springs, it will also change the tuning of the string. So you will need to keep re-tuning/re-adjusting until the bridge is parallel with the body, and that first string stays in tune.

4. Once the first string is in tune, move on to the next. Now Repeat that process with all the strings, until the guitar stays in tune, and the bridge remains parallel to the body.


It'll be a little (or alot) frustrating the first few times you do it, but don't give up. The more times you do it, the easier it'll get.

You should also read the first few post of this thread . It'll help.

I'll can answer any more questions you have too.
You can call me Aaron.


♠♣♥♦
Out on parole, any more instances of plum text and I get put back in...
#7
By adjusting the springs in the back of your guitar via the screw. If you want to put more tension onto the trem block then rotate both screws clockwise, if you want to lessen the pull on the trem block then you rotate it counter clockwise.
#8
Quote by MicahChaney
I agree with ibanezgod. Get a hardtail if you want to change tunings so much.

Everytime you go to a different tuning you have to adjust the springs or that screw in the cavity to compensate for the different tension that the new tuning will have. If you don't and just unscrew the locking tuners and tune down, then the decrease in tension will cause your trem to pull up and you will only be able to push the bar downwards. And the opposite goes for tuning up to Eb standard from Drop C. The trem will be so far down that you will only be able to pull it up.

I'd just pick a tuning and stick with it or get a hardtail.



I think the opposite is true. Tuning DOWN without adjusting the springs would pull the bridge down into the cavity where those springs are, and then the bar would push down only. When you tune down you lessen the string tension, and that makes the springs' pressure higher than the strings'. That means the bridge has to sink into the body.
#9
Quote by azn_guitarist25
By adjusting the springs in the back of your guitar via the screw. If you want to put more tension onto the trem block then rotate both screws clockwise, if you want to lessen the pull on the trem block then you rotate it counter clockwise.



Which Screws?
Poop.


Yes, poop.
#10
Quote by MattAnderson111
Which Screws?


Ah yeah flip over your guitar (so the back is facing up) and there is a rectangular plate unscrew that plate and to the left of the cavity you will note 2 screws, well those are the screws.
#12
Alright. I think I finally know how to do it, can someone tell me if I'm right or wrong?

1) Unlock nut clamp
2) Tune string to desired pitch
3) add/remove tension from the screws in the back until tremolo is parallel to body, keep adjusting until string stays in tune.
4) Repeat steps for all 6 strings.

Alright, now is that right?

Also, do I unlock ALL the nut clamps, tune until they are all in pitch, then re-lock every nut clamp OR do I do the first 2 strings, then lock that nut clamp, next 2 strings, then lock that nut clamp, etc.

AND, since they're 2 screws in the back to add/remove tension, do i screw both when adding/removing tension?
Poop.


Yes, poop.
Last edited by MattAnderson111 at Oct 9, 2009,
#13
Quote by MattAnderson111
Alright. I think I finally know how to do it, can someone tell me if I'm right or wrong?

1) Unlock nut clamp
2) Tune string to desired pitch
3) add/remove tension from the screws in the back until tremolo is parallel to body, keep adjusting until string stays in tune.
4) Repeat steps for all 6 strings.

Alright, now is that right?

Also, do I unlock ALL the nut clamps, tune until they are all in pitch, then re-lock every nut clamp OR do I do the first 2 strings, then lock that nut clamp, next 2 strings, then lock that nut clamp, etc.

AND, since they're 2 screws in the back to add/remove tension, do i screw both when adding/removing tension?


Yes.

It's easiest to do it one string at a time, You can do two at a time to save time, but it's a little harder to get the adjustment right the first time.
You can call me Aaron.


♠♣♥♦
Out on parole, any more instances of plum text and I get put back in...