#1
Okay so I've been combing the lessons on this website and have started to learn some scales. Besides the major scale, in the key of E & C whatever that means, I've also been learning pentatonic scales cause everyone tells me to. Now I realize a scale is basically pattern of notes. But now what the hell do I do? Are you suppose to make chords out of scales, or play the scales on different parts of the fretboard, or modify them with your own picking? I really don't know. All though let me take an educated guess, something tells me scales are used as a basis for modifying them and making you're own sounds out of them, and of course playing them in different keys, tones, and sections of the fretboard. Is that it?

Eh, and while I'm at it what's the deal with full chords why do they always start between frets 1-3? Are you suppose to move them up and down the fretboard, or is that what power, and move able chords are for?
#2
Only open chords are at the low frets. The next thing you need to learn is barre chords, it will open your eyes to a lot of theory Plus, its one of the most basic things you need to know about guitar, even before the major scale in my opinion :P
#3
Quote by zipmike
Only open chords are at the low frets. The next thing you need to learn is barre chords, it will open your eyes to a lot of theory Plus, its one of the most basic things you need to know about guitar, even before the major scale in my opinion :P

Open chords are not only at low frets and barre chords are not only at high frets. Also, barre chords (and chords in general) are pretty useless if you don't know how they work, which the major scale teaches you.

hxc-violinist, you need to get your tuchus into the Musician Talk forum and read the music theory FAQ (it's stickied at the top of the forum). Don't try to do it all in one night. Tackle it bit by bit. If something in there is really giving you trouble and you've read it a million times and still don't get it, go ahead and start a thread asking for clarification (make sure to say that you've read the sticky and still don't get it, or you will be flamed for not reading it). I enjoy helping noobs, because the world can always use more informed and talented musicians.
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#4
Scales are the basis for pretty much everything. From the major scale, you can derive major chords, minor scales, pentatonic scales, etc.. For example lets take a look at the C major scale. The notes are C D E F G A B C. Now lets make it C major pentatonic. A major pentatonic scale is just a major scale without the 4th and 7th notes. So C major pentatonic would be C D E G A C. Now you could make it minor pentatonic by taking the major pentatonic and make the 2nd, 3rd and 5th notes a half-step higher. So that would be C Eb F G Bb C.

Chords can be built from scales by deciding what intervals you want in it. A normal major chord has the 1st, 3rd, and 5th notes of the scale in it. And then you could have some crazy chords like B11sus4add13, but all you have to do is look at the scale and you can usually figure out what notes it is.

The key of a scale basically just means the note that scales resides to. So you wouldn't want to end a B major scale on F#. It will sound unfinished.

Other than that, just play around with the scales. Move around a bit. Don't just stay in one position. A scale isn't a position, it's just notes.
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#5
A scale is basically a group of notes that sound good together. The key tells you what scale you are using as it tells you the root note and whether it is a major or minor scale.

The major scale is a great place to start - but learn how it works. Understand it in terms of steps (WWHWWWH) and notes (eg C Maj is C D E F G A B) and intervals (eg root, maj 2nd, maj 3rd, perfect 4th etc), then once all that makes sense learn to harmonise the scale by stacking 3rds. That will teach you the basics of chord construction, and how chords fit into a key. That means you can use the scale for chord progressions.

To use the scale for lead lines you basically just construct your melody using notes from the scale.

Open chords are basically chords that use open strings in them - which is why they are normally on the lower frets. When you learn barre chords (which are a pig at first, but keep at it, they get easier) you'll be able to move them up and down the neck. You can move power chords up and down the neck, but they will not give a song the same 'flavour' as full chords as they do not include the 3rd - which is the note that determines whether the chord is major or minor.

If you haven't already, take a look at the Music Theory FAQ - its pretty good and links to some good threads and articles.
#6
Hang on you're the guy who plays violin right?

Learn the notes on the fretboard and then apply the same stuff to guitar?
#7
He needs to learn what intervals actually are first, intervals and the major scale, and you basically have the basis for all theory, kinda thing.
Guitar FTW
#8
Quote by Ikonoklast
Hang on you're the guy who plays violin right?

Learn the notes on the fretboard and then apply the same stuff to guitar?
Its not quite as simple as that lol

Violin's great for finger dexterity and independence, and for developing your ear, and for learning notation, but the majority of violinists don't improvise, so they never really think about how to use scales. Also, you don't play chords on a violin - you play dyads, but for most people thats as far as it goes - I couldn't get my head around chords til I started playing guitar because I never played an instrument that uses them before that.
#9
Quote by blayze101
He needs to learn what intervals actually are first, intervals and the major scale, and you basically have the basis for all theory, kinda thing.


I know that intervals are the half step, full step kind of junk. All though when it comes to reading a chord that's not in tablature, which is only necessary right now because I'm trying to learn how to construct chords and I get ridiculously lost. I don't know where to start the damn things. All though I can figure that out on my own, I'll come across the answer some where on a DVD or this website so don't worry about that.

And no I don't actually play violin, at all. I just think it makes my name funny since HXC is an acronym used by all these young bull**** emo 70's punk wannabe types to spell out Hard Core. So really hxc-violinist a.k.a hardcore violinist, it doesn't make a lot of sense. But violin is cool I do want to learn how to play.
#10
Your first step is too learn your intervals inside and out. One you have your intervals down (m3,P5,Tritone, etc.) then you can move onto chord construction. Your major scale is what everything is derived from. You should learn your Major/minor pentatonic first though. Learn theory on paper then apply it to the fretboard. I have a couple of lessons up about intervals.
#11
http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/for_beginners/learning_music_theory_the_beginning.html
This is what you will need to get you started. Take my word for it, it was very, VERY helpful.

Another suggestion might be to get your butt down to your music store and buy a theory book.
I'm that dude with the fro.
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#12
Quote by DaddyTwoFoot
Open chords are not only at low frets and barre chords are not only at high frets. Also, barre chords (and chords in general) are pretty useless if you don't know how they work, which the major scale teaches you.

hxc-violinist, you need to get your tuchus into the Musician Talk forum and read the music theory FAQ (it's stickied at the top of the forum). Don't try to do it all in one night. Tackle it bit by bit. If something in there is really giving you trouble and you've read it a million times and still don't get it, go ahead and start a thread asking for clarification (make sure to say that you've read the sticky and still don't get it, or you will be flamed for not reading it). I enjoy helping noobs, because the world can always use more informed and talented musicians.


Open chords ARE only at low frets. That's why they're called open chords, they're in the open position and use open strings. You can move them up, but then they aren't open chords.
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