#1
I was wondering how long it should take me to be able to 'shred'. Since the end of summer I've been practicing exercises and I gonna say they've only increased about 20% (i'm not really sure). Is this good? bad? what? I feel like it's really slow. Also seeing as how I started practicing correctly at the end of june i feel like i should be much faster. I've been playing for about a year and four months, and i play around 8 hours a day. Of that time i spend an hour on technique. I don't want to be the fastest player, but I want to be able to play fast.
so how long does it take to shred? I saw an internet post that said you could play scarified by racer x in 6 months without being able play fast what so ever. is that actually true?
#2
Playing fast is an art in itself. You'll be able to shred a standard major scale in about 6 months if you practise correctly but to really get the patterns, the runs and various licks clean and correct can take a long time.

I don't know if somebody else has also experienced this but sometimes my speed just increases overnight. One day I'm struggling to play at 190 bpm and been practising at this tempo for a month or so and suddenly the next day I nail the run.

Have patience keep on practising. It'll come to you.

And the Scarified thing is bull****. Really depends on you. If you practise day in and day out then yes probably. But that solo is not all about speed, it's about getting the dynamics right.
#3
ok thanks. by the way, do you practice licks to build speed or excersices? should i just learn some fast licks, then practice them every day?
#4
Don't worry about playing fast, but more so playing accurately.

Practise scales, and do them at a comfortable bpm, then increase when you can play perfectly, also its really good to play with a metronome.

Eventually, your fingers will get used to that pattern and you'll be able to play them at fast speeds without doing much thinking. It still requires alot of practice.


Accuracy comes first, speed comes with lots and lots of practice.
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#5
Everyone learns at a different pace. You will get discouraged if you start to think that you should be at a certain skill level after x amount of time.

About Scarified; you'd have to be basically a prodigy to be able to play it after only 6 months. Especially the last solo with all the string skipping.
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#6
Quote by armadillo137
ok thanks. by the way, do you practice licks to build speed or excersices? should i just learn some fast licks, then practice them every day?



I would suggest that you learn songs rather than learning some obscure licks floating on the internet. When you learn songs you already have the entire thing in mind and you are able to play with a litte practise. After sometime, when you are comfortable with the song, you'll see that some ideas will pop up in your head which are derivatives of the licks used in the song. You can build on this and make your own litte runs and technique.


To build up speed, I pretty much followed John Petrucci's "Rock Discipline". Try starting out with standard scale shapes and when you have nailed them, try innovating, try creating a run or something. It necessarily doesn't have to be a 6 string run, try constructing/playing a single or 2 string run.
#7
Not that speed is my main ambition as aguitarist, but I've always found that whatever it is that you're working on, the better you get, the higher your standards get. What you think is amazing now may seem mediocre by the time you're good enough to do it. So to answer your question, maybe in six months you might be able to 'shred' something, but then when you can play G major at 190bpm, you might feel that that is lame.

The hard truth - music is unrewarding.

Ok thats not true. But you know what I mean.
#8
playing scales mindlessly to a crazy high tempo is unrewarding as a musician. whats the point of speed if you can't phrase good over chords? playing fast doesn't make you a great or even good guitar player, now on a skill level thats different. make music find your groove and style and speed will follow with time trust me!
Last edited by 1mmpick at Oct 10, 2009,
#9
Quote by Heminator89
Playing fast is an art in itself.


Not really. Playing fast is simply having enough control over your dynamics/articulation/timing that your playing will still sound clean at a higher tempo. The more control you have, the faster you'll be able to play. But to classify ''playing fast'' as ''an art in itself'' is simply wrong and misleading. People will think they will need to practice differently and/or play with different technique in order to achieve high speed, when really the approach to practice should rather be along the same lines as playing at slow/moderate tempos.
#11
How long is a piece of string?

To 'shred' usually means to be technically awesome. So to learn to 'shred' flawlessly, i'd say a good few years until you're even close, and that's with regular, proper, intense practice.
#12
It varies greatly. The biggest factor is the quality of your practice. If you are working on progressively harder material, paying attention to the areas you have trouble with and working on them, not settling and making sure you can play with everything you learn with authority, and above all focusing while you practice, then you will make fairly rapid progress.
How you define your goals along the way makes all the difference. Here's an example. Suppose you are working on some material, and the song tempo is 120bpm. Currently you can play it at 100 bpm. It is not bad, but a little sloppy in places. There's a tempation that the next goal would be to play it at 105 bpm. This is NOT the right way to go about it. The next goal is to play it absolutely rock solid at the same 100 bpm, or even 90 or 80 if that's what it takes to get it to where you own that thing. At that point, you can start creeping the tempo up, not before. In other words, focus less on speed, and more on playing stuff well, and that will build a solid foundation, and the speed will come a lot more easily after that (and actually sound good, no one wants to achieve all this speed only for it sound sloppy!)
#13
Depends, speed shouldn't be a goal, good songwriting skills should. Speed just makes you more adaptable. If you can play 128th notes at 1,000,000 BPM but can't write a decent song, your a useless musician. But back on topic, there is no set amount of time your going to get better in.
#14
Quote by Dio10101
Depends, speed shouldn't be a goal, good songwriting skills should. Speed just makes you more adaptable. If you can play 128th notes at 1,000,000 BPM but can't write a decent song, your a useless musician. But back on topic, there is no set amount of time your going to get better in.

That's not all there is to being a musician. I've never written a song and i love playing.

Look at various bands - most of their stuff is written by maybe 1 or 2. Some people just like playing without the creative side.
#15
songwriting is being a musician thats all there is to it, if you like playing other peoples tunes that is completely fine but that just seems to be more of a hobby. no one wants to listen to some dude play an a minor scale over and over again and they won't say yeah he is a good musician after they hear it
#16
Could you have generalised any more?

There is a difference between a song writer who can write structure songs and a musician that can't.
#17
Don't worry so much about the speed. Practice your accuracy, and over-time, speed will come.

You see people who move their fingers heaps, but miss all of the notes. Then you see others who's fingers seem to be not moving, though the notes played are incredible fast. This is good technique; strive for it.
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#18
Quote by 1mmpick
songwriting is being a musician thats all there is to it, if you like playing other peoples tunes that is completely fine but that just seems to be more of a hobby. no one wants to listen to some dude play an a minor scale over and over again and they won't say yeah he is a good musician after they hear it
Many classical musicians make a living out of performing other people's work. Would you say that they're not real musicians and that their career is nothing more than a hobby?
Last edited by leephan at Oct 10, 2009,
#19
Quote by leephan
Many classical musicians make a living out of performing other people's work. Would you say that they're not real musicians and that their career is nothing more than a hobby?


I agree with your take on this. Look at dudes in an orchestra. They don't write their own music they play what the conductor tells them to, and these guys are clearly musicians, not hobbyists.

To me, the way to truly experience a piece of music that you love is to play it. Listening to it doesn't even come close to what you experience when you play it. In my books, that does NOT make a person a hobbyist! In fact, this is why one of my long term goals is to be able to sight read in real time, so that I can experience more of the music of great guitarists in this way.

If a person truly loves music, they want to learn everything about it that they can. Spending time learning the work of great musicians is a must if you want to do this.

This is not to take away at all from the importance of creating. In fact, the learning the work of others, and learning to create your own music go hand in hand.
Last edited by se012101 at Oct 11, 2009,
#20
I'm not saying I don't enjoy playing other peoples work, and I should have changed my wording around, because yes you guys are right. But really to answer the OP take your time and have fun with the guitar like I've said and other people have said don't worry about speed it's going to come with time. My apologies for the terrible description of what I'm trying to get at, basically I guess speed should not be the goal of guitarist!