#1
So I've been playing for over a year now, and I really don't feel happy with my progress. All I ever seem to do is learn tabs poorly and then I get frustrated and bored with them and move onto other songs and it's a repeating cycle. I know a little bit of theory, major and minor scales and the pentatonic scale but I'm not 100% comfortable with it. I can't just move scales all over the fretboard to improvise well, I just stick to the scale patterns in one particular place so anything I improvise always just sounds the same. I really don't know where to go from here. I've tried reading about theory but for the most part I don't understand it and I feel I should be a lot better than I am now given how much I play (probably an hour a day for the past year.) Where do I go from here? I feel like I'm stuck in a rut and I'm not getting any better. I play new songs in powertabs but I never get around to learning them well, it's all just slow and scrappy. Has anyone been in this situation and can offer any insight?

Thanks.
You are like a hurricane
There's calm in your eye.
And I'm gettin' blown away
To somewhere safer
where the feeling stays.
I want to love you but
I'm getting blown away.
#3
Quote by mdwallin
I did this when I tried to teach myself piano. Get a lesson or two, just every 2 or 3 weeks. Teachers are good at MAKING you play things right and in full.


Okay, that sounds good I'll check that out. Any other ideas of what to do/learn? I feel like I'm in a rut here and really need some advice
You are like a hurricane
There's calm in your eye.
And I'm gettin' blown away
To somewhere safer
where the feeling stays.
I want to love you but
I'm getting blown away.
#4
a) Teacher, as mdwallin said.
b) Set practice schedule. Write it down, follow it like your life depends on it.
c) Break songs up into sections- just learn the chorus, or the intro, or whatever you're having trouble with.
#5
Do you know the notes on the fretboard? Best way to learn theory (i'm starting this with modes) is to play them rather than look at them as a finger pattern.

So for instance, what i'm doing at the minute - rather than following finger patterns, i'm playing the C major scale starting off every C on the guitar. Then i'm doing D dorian, starting off every D and so on and so forth. Understanding theory without knowing your notes on the neck will be hard.
#6
challenge yourself to learn something you love perfectly right through. When you do that you will feel good and feel more accomplished. Then do a few more. When you have maybe three or four that you have perfected you will also feel confident enough to play those songs in front of people.

It stands to reason - if you only ever half learn a song you will only ever be a half decent player.
Si
Last edited by 20Tigers at Oct 10, 2009,
#7
Quote by 20Tigers
challenge yourself to learn something you love perfectly right through. When you do that you will feel good and feel more accomplished. Then do a few more. When you have maybe three or four that you have perfected you will also feel confident enough to play those songs in front of people.

It stands to reason - if you only ever half learn a song you will only ever be a half decent player.

This is good advice, although don't fall into the trap of just playing the same song over and over hoping you'll one day get it right. If you can't play something all the way through then you need to look at why you can't play it. If there's a bit you can't do you need to look at why your technique doesn't allow you to play it, go away and fix it, and then come back to said song. You need to do this for everything you play, whether that be working on rhythm, alternate picking, muting or whatever.