#1
Hey people!

I'm pretty new to guitar playing. I've owned a few guitars for many years but never payed them much attention up till now. Now that I've started out I've favored the electric guitar (It's a beginner guitar, some yamaha erg-121) but I'd rather be playing acoustic steel.

I have an acoustic steel guitar. It's a Tanglewood TW28ST-USA. It has a pretty nice sound but it's absolutely DREADFUL to play. I've noticed the neck was pretty badly underbowed so I've made some careful adjustments to improve this. There may be other setup related issues with the guitar I am not sure. I'm also not certain about what strings are on it. What I do now is taking a F bar chord at the first fret requires a pressure that is just insane as compared to the electric. Allover playing the guitar is very cumbersome, it just needs tons of pressure. Open chord works but is annoying, bar chords are just dreadful! It's like I'm trying to squeeze the guitar dead.

Now I know playing an acoustic demands more than an electric, but my question here, as a beginner, is how easy-played an acoustic steel can be? Is my tanglewood anywhere close to easily played or should I invest in a different guitar?

I guess I could spend money on having the tanglewood set up correctly too, perhaps with a set of lighter gauge strings too, but I'm not interested in putting the money out for this if I'm still using a guitar that isn't easy to play. I'd rather just buy something else. I bought all my guitars way back when I was on a buying frenzy of some sort which explains the reason for not considering things like this. Stupid stupid stupid!

Kristian
#2
You should probably get a new guitar, when acoustics get warped, it SUCKS. But it shouldn't be too hard to play. The strings are probably going to be a bit closer together than your electric and you wont be able to bend as easily.
Gear

EastWood Sidejack DLX
Epiphone Blues Custom 30
S.U.F VRH FUZZ
MXR Mirco Amp
BOSS BD-1 (Blues Driver)
Dunlop CryBaby
#3
Your Tanglewood should be just fine with some TLC. First off, and you already nailed it, you should get it setup. This alone can make the difference of night and day in playability. New strings are a must, but I don't recommend you go any lower than .011's. .012's are pretty much the norm for steel string acoustics, and yes, they are going to be harder to fret than an electric. But, if the action and fretboard relief are nice and low and you get no buzzing, the guitar will be quite easy to play. You will of course need to build up the needed finger strength in order to play it. It's a fact of life with acoustics.
Check around where you live for a reputable luthier/guitar tech who can do the needed adjustments to your guitar and not charge you a bundle in the process. Setups are almost strictly labor, minus the cost of a new set of strings, so keep this in mind when asking about pricing. If the shop wants to charge you $100 for the job, keep looking around. As long as you aren't replacing any parts, it shouldn't run you more than about $40 or so since all that's needed is some adjusting.