#1
I have a neck diagram, of the C Major scale across the entire neck, and i have a couple questions

- Does the Major scale have shapes along the entire neck like the pentatonic scales do?

- If not can I start anywhere on this neck digram and still be in the Key of C?

- I have found all the notes for the A major, B Major, and so on and they are in the C Major Scale diagram across the entire neck. How would I Play the C Major scale across the entire neck without changing keys constantly.

This is confusing to me so hopefully you understand what I am asking.

edit....*****

I realaized i posted this in the wrong spot but i did a search on this forum. Somone was talking about Major scale and Penatonics. Are the Shapes exactly the same except I just add and extra two notes to the shapes of the pentatonic?
Last edited by gpffa at Oct 10, 2009,
#2
1) You should try get out of the habit of refering to scales as shapes, instead, try to learn them as intervals. But yes, it does have "shapes" like the pentatonic. Again to re-iterate, try not to learn them as shapes!

2) As long as your scale starts on the note C, and you play a major scale, you'll be in C Major. If you start from a note other than C, but still play the exact same notes (For example: D E F G A B C D) You'll be playing in a MODE of C (that particular mode is D Dorian, but you dont need to learn about modes for the time being).

3) Im confused about this last question.


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#3
Quote by gpffa
I have a neck diagram, of the C Major scale across the entire neck, and i have a couple questions

- Does the Major scale have shapes along the entire neck like the pentatonic scales do?

- If not can I start anywhere on this neck digram and still be in the Key of C?

- I have found all the notes for the A major, B Major, and so on and they are in the C Major Scale diagram across the entire neck. How would I Play the C Major scale across the entire neck without changing keys constantly.

This is confusing to me so hopefully you understand what I am asking.

1. The major scale does have shapes.
2. You can also start anywhere on the neck diagram and still be in the key of C. As long as you're playing the notes: C, D, E, F, G, A, B, C then you will be playing in C major (or A minor) or a mode of C major.
3. The notes of A major and B major are NOT in the C major scale.
C major is: C, D, E, F, G, A, B, C
A major is: A, B, C#, D, E, F#, G#, A
B major is: B, C#, D#, E, F#, G#, A#, B
The formula for a major scale is W, W, H, W, W, W, H. The Ws stand for a whole step (move up 2 frets on your guitar to go up a whole step). The Hs stand for a half step (move up 1 fret on your guitar to go up a half step).
So to get for example D major:
Start on D, move up 2 frets to E, another 2 frets to F#, 1 fret to G, 2 frets to A, 2 frets to B, 2 frets to C# and 1 more fret to get to D. So the D major scale is: D, E, F#, G, A, B, C#, D.

If you're having trouble with this: check out http://www.zentao.com/guitar/theory/ and click the link called "The Major Scale". It goes into more depth than I did in my explanation and the site overall is helpful for learning your theory basics.
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#4
A "C major scale" is a major scale starting on a C note. So yes the major scale does have different shapes but they're the same for different notes. What I'm trying to say is, to get a D major scale you just move your C major scale shape(s) up so the root note is a D. If you move a C major scale up to another fret you won't be in the key of C any more. Unless the root note is still a C.
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Last edited by falconthefirst at Oct 10, 2009,
#5
As said in the first post: DON'T REMEMBER SCALES AS "SHAPES".

I find myself guilty of doing it sometimes.. But really, learn the notes on your guitar and play scale that way, it will ultimately serve you better..
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#6
Quote by RDSElite
As said in the first post: DON'T REMEMBER SCALES AS "SHAPES".

I find myself guilty of doing it sometimes.. But really, learn the notes on your guitar and play scale that way, it will ultimately serve you better..

I do both, whenever I learn a new scale the first thing I learn is a basic pattern to play the scale, something like:
E||---------------------------
B||---------------------------
G||----------------------7-9-
D||-----------7-9-10-------
A||--7-9-10----------------
E||---------------------------
That would be the E minor scale. So now I've got a basic thing that I can move around to make different minors or play them in different octaves.
After that I go about learning all the notes of the scale across the fretboard.
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#7
Quote by gpffa


edit....*****

I realaized i posted this in the wrong spot but i did a search on this forum. Somone was talking about Major scale and Penatonics. Are the Shapes exactly the same except I just add and extra two notes to the shapes of the pentatonic?


Again, try not to think of them as shapes. This is where people get confused,
pentatonic scales only contain 5 intervals, therefore 5 notes per scale.
Major scales and most other scales have 7 intervals and therefore have 7 notes.

If you think of them as shapes, it wont benefit you as much when it comes to improvisation. Of corse, shapes will help you in the short term, but to progress, try to learn the theory behind them.
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#8
About learning scales as shapes...
This isn't necesarily a bad thing, as learning the 5 "shapes" across the first octave become so useful when soloing, or improving. You can quickly play in any key or mode if you know where to start the scale. Once you know the five "shapes," then you can connect them all together and just play all across the neck, and then eventually you know exactly where to play those notes without referring to them as "shapes."

So, to your first question, there are diffrerent shapes you can learn for the Major scale, just lke the Pentatonic.

Second question, which I think was addressed in a previous post, technically you will be in the the key of C Major if you start from anywhere on the diagram. It would just be a mode of C Major, but you don't need to worry about that yet. You need quite a bit of knowledge of music theory to understand it, and it seems like you're a beginner.

Your third, just play the C major scale, but start on the note A to make an A Major scale. That's the nice thing about knowing "shapes," because then you can just start the root of the "shape" off on your desired key, and you'll be playing in that key.
#9
The way I started is I printed a blank fretboard diagram. Then I chose a scale, which was C major. After that, I picked a C note on the fretboard(which was the 8th fret on the low E string in my case). Then, I figured the notes myself with the intervals(WWHWWWH). I simply drew circles (I suggest you to make root notes in another color) on notes, for one octave(only once, from C on 8th fret low E to C on 10th fret D string).

After, simply practice that scale only in that position, until you know it by heart(also make sure you know the intervals; WWHWWWH). When you got that down good, restart drawing circles for the same scale but somewhere else on the neck. Repeat it until you got down every notes on the diagram.

Focus on remembering root notes, and on the intervals(not randomly playing patterns). It helped me when I figured how root notes are placed on the neck(in relation to each others), and when I learned that going from my pinky to my index on the string below(1 finger on each fret) was the equivalent of a whole step(going up 2 frets).

Oh and when you get it all that down, start playing it in other keys, so that you learn the actual major scale, and not only C major.

Edit; Everyone learns a different way. It's that kind of thing that will click in your head eventually, no matter how hard people try to help. Overally, just learn the intervals of the major scale, then applicate it YOURSELF on the fretboard, without looking on UG. Figure it all by yourself on the fretboard and then practice moving on the fretboard playing the scale. That helps MUCH more then just looking at lessons and replicating the pattern.

Edit 2; Forgot to mention, don't just learn the scale. Also take some time to try to improvise/play in that scale. Only doing it up and down the neck gets boring.
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Last edited by Spike6sic6 at Oct 11, 2009,
#10
Quote by gpffa
I have a neck diagram, of the C Major scale across the entire neck, and i have a couple questions

- Does the Major scale have shapes along the entire neck like the pentatonic scales do?

- If not can I start anywhere on this neck digram and still be in the Key of C?

- I have found all the notes for the A major, B Major, and so on and they are in the C Major Scale diagram across the entire neck. How would I Play the C Major scale across the entire neck without changing keys constantly.

This is confusing to me so hopefully you understand what I am asking.

edit....*****

I realaized i posted this in the wrong spot but i did a search on this forum. Somone was talking about Major scale and Penatonics. Are the Shapes exactly the same except I just add and extra two notes to the shapes of the pentatonic?

It does have shapes I guess, but they work better as three note per string shapes. Although if all you do is play shapes your playing will be very boring, repetitive, unoriginal, linear, predictable and, well you get the idea.
With any scale you can start anywhere as long as you play the intervals and notes of the scale and the key you want. The lowest root note is not the lowest note in a scale, the lowest note you can play that is in the scale is.

For you third question well, A major isn't all in C major, A major has a C# for it's major 3rd, which isn't in C major.
Quote by falconthefirst
A "C major scale" is a major scale with a root C note.

fix'd
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Last edited by Deep*Kick at Oct 11, 2009,
#11
Quote by TatarSalad2
Your third, just play the C major scale, but start on the note A to make an A Major scale. That's the nice thing about knowing "shapes," because then you can just start the root of the "shape" off on your desired key, and you'll be playing in that key.

TS don't confuse this advice with playing in different keys. He's referring to the fact that the same SHAPES can be moved around. Not the fact that you can start the C major scale on the A NOTE, because that's a different key altogether.