#1
Ok guys I'm about to buy a new guitar...right now all I have is a Squier strat and a few acoustics.

I've finally saved up the money and I am thinking of getting one of the '59 reissue Gibson Les Pauls.... what do you guys think?

I pay blues and classic rock with a little country. I also am in a band so we play stuff like Killswitch Engage and stuff (which I plan on getting rid of!) haha....no offense but that's not my cup of tea!
#2
Good choice. A Les Paul should be able to handle all of that and more. Try it out before you buy, and if you like it, then buy the guitar.
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#4
Great choice but really make sure you love the neck. Does the re-issue have fretless wonder frets? I heard some people can't make bends on those, though I never had a problem.
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#5
whats ur amp?
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#6
I believe one of only three people who are active on this site who have actually owned one, so let me weigh in with the main thing you have to take into account. I can not stress this aspect enough.

Every single one is different.

Do not buy online. Do not settle for the first one you pick up off the shelf. When I was shopping for mine, I tried out countless Gibsons, mostly Custom Shop, and all of them felt and sounded terrible except for one '59 reissue and one of the older Standards. I bought the '59 Reissue and I don't regret it at all, it is simply perfect for me in every way and I genuinely can't image any guitar sounding or feeling better. On the other hand, it did take months of searching to find it.

For production Gibsons (production = anything that is not specifically 'Custom Shop'), the problem is quality control. Specification is consistent but you can pick up one Standard that has fine fretwork and another where the frets have lifted all over the place. Some Standards will be finished perfectly, others will have bubbles and even cracks right out of the factory door.
For Custom Shop Gibsons (such as the VOS Reissue models), the quality control and build quality is much more consistent and good quality, but the actual spec varies a lot more since they're all finished by hand. I've played '58 reissues which had necks thinner than some '60 reissues. I found an Axcess that weighed more than a Custom. Some of the '59s had a really dark tone, some were brighter than most SGs I've heard. Basically, whether they call it a '58, '59, '60 or Custom is irrelevant, because every guitar varies so extremely regardless of the name.

So to sum up:
- Do not buy online.
- Be prepared to go to many shops to find a good one - I had to travel right across the country to find mine.
- It's going to take a long time.
- Be prepared for the fact you may never find one that suits you.


If you want a fuller review, I wrote one on U-G a while back, HERE. Some people whined that it was too long, but if you're thinking about dropping this much money on a guitar, it's worth your time to read and research as much as possible.
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#8
Quote by MrFlibble
I believe one of only three people who are active on this site who have actually owned one, so let me weigh in with the main thing you have to take into account. I can not stress this aspect enough.

Every single one is different.

Do not buy online. Do not settle for the first one you pick up off the shelf. When I was shopping for mine, I tried out countless Gibsons, mostly Custom Shop, and all of them felt and sounded terrible except for one '59 reissue and one of the older Standards. I bought the '59 Reissue and I don't regret it at all, it is simply perfect for me in every way and I genuinely can't image any guitar sounding or feeling better. On the other hand, it did take months of searching to find it.

For production Gibsons (production = anything that is not specifically 'Custom Shop'), the problem is quality control. Specification is consistent but you can pick up one Standard that has fine fretwork and another where the frets have lifted all over the place. Some Standards will be finished perfectly, others will have bubbles and even cracks right out of the factory door.
For Custom Shop Gibsons (such as the VOS Reissue models), the quality control and build quality is much more consistent and good quality, but the actual spec varies a lot more since they're all finished by hand. I've played '58 reissues which had necks thinner than some '60 reissues. I found an Axcess that weighed more than a Custom. Some of the '59s had a really dark tone, some were brighter than most SGs I've heard. Basically, whether they call it a '58, '59, '60 or Custom is irrelevant, because every guitar varies so extremely regardless of the name.

So to sum up:
- Do not buy online.
- Be prepared to go to many shops to find a good one - I had to travel right across the country to find mine.
- It's going to take a long time.
- Be prepared for the fact you may never find one that suits you.


If you want a fuller review, I wrote one on U-G a while back, HERE. Some people whined that it was too long, but if you're thinking about dropping this much money on a guitar, it's worth your time to read and research as much as possible.

i disagree with what you say about production gibsons not having slight variations on the specs, because to put it simply.. they do. and that itself is what makes people blow the whole QC thing out of proportion - yes, they do let a few guitars with dodgy finishes, faulty electronics and shoddy fretwork escape the nashville plant, but there are still going to be some (actually, most) which will be perfectly good guitars which you just don't like.

edit: also, it's perfectly normal for a les paul to have a brighter sound than a traditional SG, since SGs actually have a naturally very dark tone anyway - it's just a tighter, more punchy tone, which is often perceived as a brighter output, but they are actually very dark sounding guitars, on the whole. I guess it depends which way you look at it, really.

However, yes, never buy a gibson custom shop model online, ever ever ever. I've tried a few custom historic (i think they are the 1990s version of the VOS range) R8s and R9s, and they were consistently fantastic but also consistently different to one another, some i liked better than others - i actually liked the one that sounded a bit wrong, it was kind of reedy and nasal sounding, but still very rounded and versatile, and still an amazing sound, equally as good as the others i played, just.. different and kind of quirky. I'd love to own that guitar, because not only was it the best playing of the bunch, it sounded very unique indeed. but i could never afford it and will never find another one that sounds like that- and that's just too bad. but the next person who went into the shop wanting to check out some les pauls might've hated that one, having been looking for a more traditional les paul tone from a les paul
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Last edited by Blompcube at Oct 11, 2009,
#9
What amp are you using? This might seem stupid, but if you get a $5000 gutiar and run it with an MG, it will be bad. It's a much better idea if you have a bad amp to spread out your budget. Sure, it's not a custom shop '59, but can you live without a flametop? Then get a '58 and a nice amp. Really, a great guitar through a crappy amp will still sound crappy. Plus if you go used instead you could do a great buy. A Gibson from the 90's will generally be a better deal than most modern day ones. I found the tone better in my '98 Studio than in many of the custom shop Gibsons.
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#10
How the **** did you get enough money for a 59' reissue? Are you a pimp or a drug dealer?

I'd like to know what's your amp, too.
#11
+∞ on the amp thing. if you've only got a squire at the moment i suspect you will not be playing through a good amp.

if your amp isn't too great i'd suggest getting a '58 reissue (i personally like them better than the '59s) and with the $1500 or so that you've saved, get a really nice amp.
#12
I'm not trying to discourage you but why buy a $6000 guitar when, for half the price, you could still buy a very nice guitar and have ~$3000 left over for an equally nice amp?
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#13
Quote by Sunshine86
I'm not trying to discourage you but why buy a $6000 guitar when, for half the price, you could still buy a very nice guitar and have ~$3000 left over for an equally nice amp?



a man has to dream. i wanted a '59 reissue at first, but then i found my 2004 standard which i would take over any guitar gibson has ever produced in its entire history. i truly do believe my les paul is the best guitar on the entire planet.

this is an example of why you don't need a '59 reissue. TS, make an amp priority. they are what makes your tone. a crap guitar through a great amp will sound pretty awesome. a great guitar through a crap amp will sound horrible.
#14
I have had the opportunity to play one of these guitars, as has one of my good friends. I own a Les Paul Traditional Plus. This 59 reissue is not worth the extra money. Is it an awesome guitar? Yes, without a doubt it is. But for $4000 more than a traditional? Heck F'ing no. You can buy 4 guitars an one heck of an amp rig for that kind of money. Seriously sit and think about what kind of cash you are talking about.

With that said, if you have it and want to blow it, you will at least be getting an awesome guitar out of it.....but there are only minimal differences (I'm pressed to even call them improvements) between this guitar and some of their cheaper ones.
#16
Ask yourself why you want the 59 historic over something cheaper like a 60 historic or 58 historic. The R9 costs more than both of the others, there are reasons for that, but make sure you know why first, and whether or not you think it's worth it. Otherwise if you're just spending that extra money for something more expensive, see if you can't go for one of the cheaper historics and put the money you saved either...

1) towards an amp
2) towards upgrades to the guitar

I know it sounds kind of ridiculous that a guitar like would need upgrades, and really it doesn't but if you're one of those types that needs to have it close to a vintage guitar, get ready for another $500-$600 or so worth of upgrades (bridge and tailpieces, pots and caps, and pickups). They're kind of trivial upgrades in terms of just having a guitar that sounds good, but are worthwhile in terms of having a reissue that sounds like a vintage guitar. It's hard to say though, I've only played a handful of stock R9s, most of the ones I've had have at least replacement pickups.
Last edited by al112987 at Oct 11, 2009,
#17
Quote by chrisrab5150
I am still looking for a new amp...can you guys help out with that?



yes... save some of the money and buy a less expensive les paul, and use your (massive) savings, and buy yourself a vox AC30 or a Marshall Vintage Modern.
#18
Quote by Lt. Shinysides
yes... save some of the money and buy a less expensive les paul, and use your (massive) savings, and buy yourself a vox AC30 or a Marshall Vintage Modern.
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#19
Quote by chrisrab5150
I am still looking for a new amp...can you guys help out with that?


Sure we can. But my question is, how big is the budget for your amp? What do you play? Any kind of tones you want? Do you gig or only play at home?
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#20
With $6000, why not get the LP Supreme and a great amp?
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#21
my dad has a 'fretless wonder guitar' its like a 72 custom gibson and its a real pain in the ass to bend strings ,,,it takes a long time to get used to it but you can do it...
#23
Quote by al112987
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you'd have to be crazy to gig with those. way to loud. the sound guy would have a nervous break down.
#25
I hate to bust peoples bubbles but I agree with Mr Fribble try not to buy online. I play dozens of guitars a week and Gibsons are very inconsistent lately even the custom shop ones. You really need to try out the guitars and get the feel of them. It's too much a pain in the a** to have to return a guitar never mind one you just laid down 2 to3 grand for.

Now for the reissues. I just missed getting a 58 reissue lPr-8 for $1000.00 the guitar shop nabbed it for a grand I would have given the guy and extra 100 and in cash not a check and now the shop is trying to get $2300.00 for it. I played the guitar and it was amazing I found one problem with it. The nitro finish started absorbing the maroon color from the lining of the case. No big deal but the binding was taking on a cranberry color. This guitar was used and in mint condition except for the color variance. Even though I think it's one of the best Gibbys I have played in a long time they will never get $2300 in this market.

A Gibson Les Paul is a great choice for you IMO probably the best tone ever in any guitar on the market. Even though I do not think they are consistent lately, when you find "that one" you will not look back.


John
#26
Quote by al112987
Ask yourself why you want the 59 historic over something cheaper like a 60 historic or 58 historic. The R9 costs more than both of the others, there are reasons for that, but make sure you know why first, and whether or not you think it's worth it.
I'd like to amend this: forget what specific year the reissue claims to be on. As I've said many times before, I've played '58 reissues with slimmer necks than '60 reissues, the finishes and weight varies wildly between each individual guitar and there is absolutely no consistent sound.

When it comes to Custom Shop models, do not ever buy or not buy a guitar just because it's not got the right year number you want in it's name or because the spec sheet on the website reads slightly differently. Forget all that, forget everything you read, forget the PR, forget the adverts, forget your preconceived notions of what a Les Paul should be. They all vary far too much to hold them to any set standard and when you're dropping this much money on a guitar the important thing is you buy one that feels and sounds good to you, that plays and sounds better than you can imagine. When you find that guitar, you buy it. You don't pass up on it just because it's £150 more than the one next to it, or because it has '1960' on it's tag instead of the holy '1959'.

Play a lot of them, find one that is perfect for you - do not accept any flaws, regardless of whether they're technical flaws or simply things that don't match your personal preferences - and when you find that perfect one, you buy it.
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#27
Quote by MrFlibble
I'd like to amend this: forget what specific year the reissue claims to be on. As I've said many times before, I've played '58 reissues with slimmer necks than '60 reissues, the finishes and weight varies wildly between each individual guitar and there is absolutely no consistent sound.

When it comes to Custom Shop models, do not ever buy or not buy a guitar just because it's not got the right year number you want in it's name or because the spec sheet on the website reads slightly differently. Forget all that, forget everything you read, forget the PR, forget the adverts, forget your preconceived notions of what a Les Paul should be. They all vary far too much to hold them to any set standard and when you're dropping this much money on a guitar the important thing is you buy one that feels and sounds good to you, that plays and sounds better than you can imagine. When you find that guitar, you buy it. You don't pass up on it just because it's £150 more than the one next to it, or because it has '1960' on it's tag instead of the holy '1959'.

Play a lot of them, find one that is perfect for you - do not accept any flaws, regardless of whether they're technical flaws or simply things that don't match your personal preferences - and when you find that perfect one, you buy it.
I'm not talking about specs. There was a pic floating around the LPF from the Gibson custom shop of mahogany body blanks being separated by grade and weight for different guitars. The ones lightest in weight were allocated for the R9s, the ones next lightest were allocated for R0s, and so on.

If that's not reason why the R9 cost more than the other reissues, I don't know what is considering they have all the same amenities otherwise.
Last edited by al112987 at Oct 12, 2009,
#28
Quote by johnro6659
I play dozens of guitars a week and Gibsons are very inconsistent lately even the custom shop ones.

Lately? this is hardly a new thing for gibson, i've played lots of early '70s gibsons which were all very very different, and i've heard about inconsistencies as early as with the first les pauls in 1952... so by the sound of it gibson have never been consistent.
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#29
ok well the problem with that is I'm not sure of any Gibson dealers around here...the closest place would be New Orleans which is about give or take 4 hours away... now I recently went to a small guitar shop in town and I seen one of the new EVH wolfgangs...I've always been a big EVH fan but I'm not sure how it would sound for blues? Any other guitars that you would recommend?
#30
I'm biased, but IMO, you can always find a better alternative at the same price point when you're talking about Gibson. There are loads of custom builders, not to mention Tyler, Anderson, Suhr (possibly PRS) and if you want a Les Paul, Tokai. Maybe an ls380.
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#31
The only les paul clones that are really going to be better than an R9 are going to be much more expensive than historics. Something like this...

http://www.mylespaul.com/forums/other-les-pauls/2947-my-guitar-clinic-59-replica.html

Which is going to cost several thousands more than a Gibson (but is admittedly a much better guitar) and there are builders out there who will use the right kinds of wood and top quality parts to make these guitars, but at a higher price point than you'd pay for a Gibson.

But that is in terms of actually having a les paul replica (as opposed to just any type of two humbucker, 4 control guitar in which you could probably get a custom one built for the same price that is objectively a better guitar). A lot of vintage Tokais are good as well but those are pretty rare and not all of them are as spectacular as some make them seem (though some of them are).
Last edited by al112987 at Oct 12, 2009,
#32
I'm just going to back up what everyone else has been saying about trying dozens of guitars. Hell, I went to 4 guitar shops in NJ, 3 guitar shops in NYC, and 3 more guitar shops in Boston till I settled on which American Standard strat to buy, and if you have the time and the money it's entirely worth it.

Also, please don't just limit yourself to one type of guitar. Try some other gibsons. try some fenders and ibanez. try some crazy brand you've never heard of before. You may find a new guitar you love.
#33
Quote by al112987
I'm not talking about specs. There was a pic floating around the LPF from the Gibson custom shop of mahogany body blanks being separated by grade and weight for different guitars. The ones lightest in weight were allocated for the R9s, the ones next lightest were allocated for R0s, and so on.

If that's not reason why the R9 cost more than the other reissues, I don't know what is considering they have all the same amenities otherwise.
I am aware of the wood selection process, which is one of the reasons why when searching I paid more attention to the '59s than the '58s.

However the point remains that they still vary so wildly, you should just ignore all that. '60s models that weigh less than the '59 and '58 ones aren't uncommon.
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