#1
I thought some of you guys might find this interesting.

Lutherie Myth/Science:
Neck Joint Type and Sustain
Conventional wisdom has it that the construction of neck joint of the instrument influences the sustain of the instrument. Neck through construction (for electric guitars and basses) is considered to offer the best sustain, followed by set neck (i.e. glued on) construction. Bolt-on necks are considered to offer the worst sustain. A recent experiment in this area suggests that this order may be backwards and that folks can't hear the difference in sustain based on neck joint type anyway
Although the connection between neck joint type and instrument sustain is usually mentioned in the context of solid body electric guitars, it is often mentioned when speaking of acoustic guitars as well. I could find no formal research on this subject at all - no instrumentation and measurement studies, no formal listening evaluations. A recent study[1] performed power analysis, spectrographic analysis, and listening evaluation on a series of purpose-built instruments. The study was based on only a small population of instruments but it was reasonably well controlled. The power analysis results suggest that the relationship between sustain and neck joint type is the reverse of the conventional wisdom on the subject. Longest sustain was associated with bolt-on necks and shortest sustain with neck through construction. The study also included listening evaluations of recordings of single notes. Subjects could not detect differences in sustain among neck through, set neck and bolt-on neck configurations.
Although limited in scope, this study does suggest that correlation between sustain and neck joint type may not be of practical significance.
#2
uhhh....ummmm...

ok there goes that myth....
Quote by Scowmoo




You deserved this, Matt.
#4
Didn't we establish this a LONG time ago?

Also, you got a source for that mate?
Fender Highway 1 Strat
Agile Septor Pro 725

Fender Hot Rod Deluxe
Axe-Fx Ultra

Trust me, I'm a medical student
#5
All I can remember is that I got it off a luthier site a while ago, I just found it on my computer and put it up here for you guys to see.

EDIT: Ah, just found the reference and site:
1. Mottola, R.M. “Sustain and Electric Guitar Neck Joint Type”
American Lutherie #91, 2007, p. 52.
A thread the link came from on another forum: http://www.elutherie.org/forum/bolt-necks-sustain-more-t18.html
and the article itself: http://www.liutaiomottola.com/myth/neckJointSustain.htm
Last edited by guitarcam123 at Oct 11, 2009,
#6
That may be...but no one can deny the added feel and aesthetics of a quality neck-through compared to some taiwanese crapocaster bolt on
Guitar - The true Religion
#7
Quote by AusMetal33
That may be...but no one can deny the added feel and aesthetics of a quality neck-through compared to some taiwanese crapocaster bolt on

That is your opinion, there are endless amounts of people who would agree with you, but there would be the same amount of people who disagree with you.

The comparison you said was a nice perfect set neck against a cheap knockoff. What about a knock off with a badly constructed set neck against an Ibanez or similar with a nice comfortable AANJ?
#8
Quote by guitarcam123
That is your opinion, there are endless amounts of people who would agree with you, but there would be the same amount of people who disagree with you.

The comparison you said was a nice perfect set neck against a cheap knockoff. What about a knock off with a badly constructed set neck against an Ibanez or similar with a nice comfortable AANJ?

Idk, I havent played a guitar to date that has beat the feel of a nice neck through. And I've played loads, including a bunch of customs ones with bolt ons. just doesnt compare for me
Quote by magnus_maximus
You're whackin' one off in the toilet and you jizz on the counter?

I hope you never get a driving license.


Quote by Albino_Rhino
Dude mangoes are so good. Imagine a blowjob, but instead of the feeling being on your dick, it's on your mouth.
#10
Quote by guitarcam123
Like I said, everyone has their own opinion.

And i agree with you.

Interesting article. I would like to read an update on this after the testing is expanded to more instruments and a wider range of tests.
epic7734
#11
yeah, i just thort of that, a neck thru is great for soloists who like to use the higher frets, without being stoped by the damn block of most bolt-on's...

still, its a interesting topic.
Quote by Scowmoo




You deserved this, Matt.
#12
I think it depends more on the quality of the joint than the type of joint.
I imagine that having a tight neck joint allows vibrations to travel between the neck and body.

This is also why hardtail guitars are said to have more sustain: transmission of energy from the strings directly to the body, rather than into a steel block and some springs.
#13
Quote by AusMetal33
That may be...but no one can deny the added feel and aesthetics of a quality neck-through compared to some taiwanese crapocaster bolt on


you're not being fair.
you're taking two completely different guitars and comparing them like that. Ofcourse a 'quality neck-through' guitar is going to be better than a 'taiwanese crapocaster'.

If you look at Ibanez for example, they have RG's with both bolt on and neck-through and both are equally comfortable to play. (they may even have glue in neck ones, i just cant recall seeing one)