#1
I'm going to be getting a used Ibanez RG120 soon, the new version comes with a tremolo bar, but the used one does not. Is it possible to buy it separately and put it on the used one?
#2
yes.
Quote by Kanthras
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#4
Quote by Silent_Crow13
You do not need one, it will most likely affect your tunning stability.


Then how am I going to get the cool whammy effect
#5
You should try whammying without a whammy bar first.
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#7
Quote by Silent_Crow13
I think they make pedals for that. I do not use pedals so I do not know what they are called.


strangely enough it`s called a digitech WHAMMY
#8
juist go to guitar center and ask. when i got an ibanez last year they didnt have the whammy bar that came with it in stock but the guy who was helping me said they had a bunch in the back so he just found one that fit
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#9
Quote by blasphemus666
juist go to guitar center and ask. when i got an ibanez last year they didnt have the whammy bar that came with it in stock but the guy who was helping me said they had a bunch in the back so he just found one that fit


I'm not getting it from Guitar Center, it's a different music store, it's not a chain it's one individual store.
#10
Do you mean it's a fixed bridge? If it is, it's not worth putting a trem on it. It'll cost more than the guitar itself.
#11
Quote by JELIFISH19
Do you mean it's a fixed bridge? If it is, it's not worth putting a trem on it. It'll cost more than the guitar itself.


The guitar is an Ibanez RG120, I have no idea if it's fixed or not.
#12
If it's not specified as a trem, then it's a fixed bridge. No, it would NOT be worth putting on.
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Quote by Anonden
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#13
It's a traditional trem bridge, not a Floyd Rose style.

I don't know why you'd buy a $200 guitar used anyway.
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#14
I have an RG120 and it has a trem
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#15
Okay, I'm a real noob at guitar, and the only difference I know between fixed bridges and floating bridges is that floating bridges will go out of tune easily, and fixed will not (I don't even know if what I just said was true).

Can someone PLEASE tell me what is a floating bridge/floating tremolo and what is a fixed bridge?
#16
Quote by dsan224
Okay, I'm a real noob at guitar, and the only difference I know between fixed bridges and floating bridges is that floating bridges will go out of tune easily, and fixed will not (I don't even know if what I just said was true).

Can someone PLEASE tell me what is a floating bridge/floating tremolo and what is a fixed bridge?

There are three (broad) categories of electric guitar bridge. There's fixed bridge, which means that there is no whammy bar whatsoever. Example:


There's a traditional, or Stratocaster-style, trem bridge:

This style of bridge can generally only lower the pitch, not raise and lower it. They tend to have lower tuning stability (but not always) because there is nothing holding the string in place. The string can shift in the nut and change pitch somewhat.

Then there is the floating, double-locking trem bridge, based off of the Floyd Rose design:

This style of bridge locks the string in place and the bridge and nut, which allows you to go up and down and use the whammy a lot without changing the tuning of the strings. They are called floating because they sit off of the guitar body and use the tension from the strings and springs in the back to balance.

The RG120 has a traditional whammy bar. (I think. I could be wrong about that.)
Quote by dudetheman
So what? I wasted like 5 minutes watching DaddyTwoFoot's avatar.


Metalheads are the worst thing that ever happened to metal.
Last edited by DaddyTwoFoot at Oct 11, 2009,
#17
Quote by DaddyTwoFoot
There are three (broad) categories of electric guitar bridge. There's fixed bridge, which means that there is no whammy bar whatsoever. Example:


There's a traditional, or Stratocaster-style, trem bridge:

This style of bridge can generally only lower the pitch, not raise and lower it. They tend to have lower tuning stability (but not always) because there is nothing holding the string in place. The string can shift in the nut and change pitch somewhat.

Then there is the floating, double-locking trem bridge, based off of the Floyd Rose design:

This style of bridge locks the string in place and the bridge and nut, which allows you to go up and down and use the whammy a lot without changing the tuning of the strings. They are called floating because they sit off of the guitar body and use the tension from the strings and springs in the back to balance.

The RG120 has a traditional whammy bar. (I think. I could be wrong about that.)


You should sticky this in a thread somewhere, this would be very helpful to new guitarists. You expalined it perfectly.

But on topic, your music store should have replacement wammy bars, if they sell guitars and guitar equipment, they should have bars in stock.