#1
A little info real quick.

Acoustic.

Changed from a Heavy gauge to a medium.

Action is just a tad high.


Well i don't want to fiddle with the truss rod if its not necessary. I also decided to maybe start tuning a 1/2 step down (just to see how i like it).

So, is tuning a half step down enough to cause the neck to flatten* (if you would please point out the correct term for me) just a little?

My guitar seems to play well with a low action , but i've been changing string gauges recently to experiment. I went back to a medium gauge from a heavy gauge. The heavy gauge of course cause more bow in the neck and i didn't feel comfortable adjusting the truss rod since i just put my new strings on. So i just played until it was time for new strings.

I bought/installed medium gauge strings, gave them a week or two, but didn't really notice any change in the neck. So just wondering if tuning a half step down will make a difference?

Or do i just need to adjust the truss rod? I am not worried about doing the adjustment, it's something i'm confident in doing. It has been a long time since i have done it though. So if anyone can also give me a few reminders i would appreciate it.

EDIT: I just started tuning down a 1/2 step a day or 2 ago and i notice my strings tend to go sharp after a little amount of time. Does that mean maybe the neck IS adjusting?


Extra question:
What is your opinion on when you should sand the saddle vs adjusting the relief of the neck?
epic7734
#2
look at it, is the neck good?
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#3
Quote by Gakbez
look at it, is the neck good?

Yes. I didn't notice any terrible intonation. Just more bow in the neck then i would like.

I was just wondering if tuning down a half step would be enough to relax the neck a bit.
epic7734
#4
the neck can handle the tension either way but i personally tune 1/2 step down on all my guitars. i just found the tone to be noticeably more fantastic after doing so.

to answer your question, i would give it a try and see how it holds up. the intonation might be a bit off.
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#5
i dont really think so. i can go from standard to drop C before i notice ANY difference. but it could depend on the neck. but thats not really a good reason to change tunings. if u dont want to mess with truss rod, take it somewhere.
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#6
Quote by xxunder-takerxx
i dont really think so. i can go from standard to drop C before i notice ANY difference. but it could depend on the neck. but thats not really a good reason to change tunings. if u dont want to mess with truss rod, take it somewhere.

I'm not changing the tuning just for this reason. I just wanted to explore a little outside of what i am used to.

And yeah i guess your right. A half step just isn't that much.

I do notice my strings tend to be a tad sharp after its been sitting for awhile. So maybe over the course of a week or so i might notice a difference.
epic7734
#7
Retune. If you don't notice a difference. then give your truss rod a quarter-turn clockwise and let it sit for about 5 minutes. Then try, repeat if necessary. Just watch for fret buzz if you get the neck too straight.
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#8
i think the strings are only going sharp cause they are new strings. usually it only takes a little while for the neck to set
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#9
A slight concave (away bow is essential for the neck to work properly. A playing card at the 5th fret when holding the 6th string down at the 1st and bottom of the neck.

Detuning can most certainly effect the counter stress resistance, the truss rod is meant to help. And is a God send on modern guitars. Most do not understand the function of them or how to use them.

I play a FULL step detuned, I did play a 1/2 step down for a number of years. I never had to really adjust my necks much from the point I set them up when I got them. My oldest guitar, my Carvin DC-400, has never required an adjustment, and it went from standard to 1/2 step down, to dropped D, to now 1 full step down. Solid body necks (mine are through the body designed by Carvin) are super strong and resistant to warp. Acoustics are very fragile and effected greatly by humidity and temp.

By all means the lessened tension should effect your acoustic neck bow, but a flat neck is going to buzz from no clearance unless you have really high string action. Truss rods only require a slight adjustment, perhaps a 1/4 turn, apply pressure in the direction you are trying to relieve or counter and allow the tension to settle. I recommend never removing all your strings at one time, except for major work. Replace the 6th to 1st one at a time to help keep the neck from experiencing really drastic tension effect.
#10
You should really stop worrying about adjusting the truss rod so much. My friend has a bass and the action on it is awful because the neck is like a banana. I offer to change it to straighten out the neck but she doesn't want to "do anything" to her bass. So fine. Her loss when her bass dies.

Look at the neck. Is it straight? If not, then adjust the truss rod. It just takes an allen wrench. The way in which it adjusts depends on whether it's a single or double action truss rod. I find tuning the middle 2 strings down helps with adjustment. Make small adjustments in the direction of more resistance, checking the neck until it looks straight and the strings are resting flat on the 6th fret when you're pushing down the 1st and 15th frets. I like to have a very tiny amount of upbow because i think it improves the action on the lower frets.

If you still really don't want to do it then take it to your local guitar shop but GET IT SEEN TO. Unless you want a guitar with a banana for a neck in future.
EH


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#11
Sorry Bud, but no good guitar tech is going to make a neck flat and totally straight. A playing card under the string at the 5th or 6th fret is standard gauge. Laws of physics being what they are, a straight neck offers no clearance unless your string height is freaky high. A good neck almost never needs adjusting and that adjustment is never more than a slight quarter turn at most. Clockwise to produce counter concave bow, and counterclockwise to move convex towards the string.

I used to have to adjust my Fender's every hot and cold season, my Carvin's never need it after the first intonation work through. I find bolt on necks have a lot more problems, acoustics like standard models are very fragile. Some necks might be so warped a heat clamp might have to be used to straighten it. If it's a bolt on, trash it. Chances are if the wood is that bad nothing is going to fix it, it will not hold counter tension.

I guess I should not be surprised someone with a warped neck cannot notice or tell their intonation is off on various frets. Hell most have no idea how to set saddles or height. I have tech'd a lot of guitars in my day. I am Eric Johnson nuts on perfect intonation or at least as good as a guitar can do.
Last edited by FoolDrive at Oct 12, 2009,
#12
Quote by FoolDrive
Sorry Bud, but no good guitar tech is going to make a neck flat and totally straight. A playing card under the string at the 5th or 6th fret is standard gauge. Laws of physics being what they are, a straight neck offers no clearance unless your string height is freaky high. A good neck almost never needs adjusting and that adjustment is never more than a slight quarter turn at most. Clockwise to produce counter concave bow, and counterclockwise to move convex towards the string.

I used to have to adjust my Fender's every hot and cold season, my Carvin's never need it after the first intonation work through. I find bolt on necks have a lot more problems, acoustics like standard models are very fragile. Some necks might be so warped a heat clamp might have to be used to straighten it. If it's a bolt on, trash it. Chances are if the wood is that bad nothing is going to fix it, it will not hold counter tension.

I guess I should not be surprised someone with a warped neck cannot notice or tell their intonation is off on various frets. Hell most have no idea how to set saddles or height. I have tech'd a lot of guitars in my day. I am Eric Johnson nuts on perfect intonation or at least as good as a guitar can do.


I've found a good dual action truss rod can make the neck very close to being straight, if not exactly. Of course it's never going to be entirely straight because of the way the wood just is. Yeah that's how i set up my guitars so there is a very small amount of clearence on the 6th fret.
EH


"Show me war; show me pestilence; show me the blood-red hands of retribution..."