#1
For those of you who don't know who he is, John Wetton played bass and did lead vocals for King Crimson in the third line up. The years of 1971-1974 I believe.

I recently got into a progressive, let's call it "mind set", and have had alot about King Crimson, so I looked up some of their works. The period with John Wetton just blows my mind. As does the period of Greg Lake as vocals and bass. The style all in all is just very melodic and fits well, not exactly what I'd call a walk in the park though. His lines on "Book of Saturday", "Starless" and "Larks Tongue In Aspic" just really capture my attention.

What do you guys think of this man? Whether just an opinion of him or in comparison to some other bassists that King Crimson have gone through, such as Greg Lake, Peter Giles, Boz Burrell, or Tony Levin?
Gear:1991 Fender MIJ Jazz/Squier VM Fretless Jazz -> Pitchblack -> Way Huge Green Rhino -> Boss OC-2 -> Boss DD-7 -> Markbass Tube 800 -> SWR 4x12.

Flat wounds. Flat wounds on everything. Everything is a little fatter when it's flatter.
#2
Check out his work in Uriah Heep and Bill Bruford's U.K.
Great stuff.....
--Gear--

5 piece blonde sparkle Gretch drum kit

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#4
I do love the great bass line on "In The Court of The Crimson King" and "21st Century Schizoid Man". Greg Lake was a beast.

I'm not quite sure how I feel about the Levin era, or the Gunn. The whole idea of using the Stick or Warr Guitars kinda turns me off cause it makes the songs harder to learn, since it's alot of tapping and the additional strings and pitches that are unachievable on a standard 4 or 5 string bass. Plus once Fripp started using New Standard Tuning it changed the whole feel of Crimson, more than any other shifts in style. And Adrian Belew kinda got a weird take on vocals. Best example of what i'm talking about is "Happy With What You Have To Be Happy With".

But it's opinion you know.
Gear:1991 Fender MIJ Jazz/Squier VM Fretless Jazz -> Pitchblack -> Way Huge Green Rhino -> Boss OC-2 -> Boss DD-7 -> Markbass Tube 800 -> SWR 4x12.

Flat wounds. Flat wounds on everything. Everything is a little fatter when it's flatter.
#5
John Wetton's resume in the prog rock scene is incredibly impressive. I love the early Crimson era with Wetton, but I am equally in love with the later era with Tony Levin, with such works as Thela hun ginjeet. I happen to be a big Belew fan.
#6
I can't really wrap my head around it. I mean the shifts in styles have always been strange when it comes to changing the Crimson line up, for example "21st Century Schizoid Man" and "Cat Food", but it seems that the lineups starting in 1981 just really shifted the styles. Was it just a desire for change or the effect of bringing in Adrian Belew as a songwriter? Or some reason I'm missing entirely? Either way Wetton just does it for me. It's a shame he was only with Crimson for two years. I think that Levin wrote some nice lines, such as "Three Of A Perfect Pair", but I still think that Wetton had a more melodic sense.
Gear:1991 Fender MIJ Jazz/Squier VM Fretless Jazz -> Pitchblack -> Way Huge Green Rhino -> Boss OC-2 -> Boss DD-7 -> Markbass Tube 800 -> SWR 4x12.

Flat wounds. Flat wounds on everything. Everything is a little fatter when it's flatter.
#7
Crimson has been Robert Fripp's baby since the beginning and the group has taken some twists and turns creatively as Fripp's musical tastes changed and he brought in new people. I am on the fence when it comes to Fripp; I respect his creativity but he can be a bit of an elitist and art for arts sake kind of guy.
#8
but lets be frank, being a musician such as Fripp is very remarkable because you are a cameleon, from their first album to the "Power to Believe" its like a different band, feel, etc. And he has worked with tons of great musician (even during Lizard they had great musicians).

JF was right saying that Wetton was more melodic while Levin and Gunn was like more technical using other tecniques and instruments but either way they are great bass players and in both styles you can get great things from them
#9
I love his bass playing, not really a fan of his voice much though. I don't know why, its nice enough, I guess i don't like moonchild much so maybe that's why. I like Levin better on bass, he is absolutely incredible. I've seen him with Crimson (Discipline tour in the 80s) and a few times with Gabriel, last time in '07 I think. I also like Belew a lot...oh and Bruford of course.
#10
Honestly? King Crimson reads like a who's who of prog rock bass players: Greg Lake, Boz Burell, John Wetton, Trey Gunn and Levin.
#11
I get that it's Fripp's baby. He's the only consistent member from 69 - current. Yet still I wonder what goes through his head when he decides to write some stuff. I mean seriously, on Discipline you have songs like "Elephant Talk" and "Frame by Frame", and then you've got stuff like "Matte Kudasai". I don't seem in commonality there! Ha ha ha.

Wetton's voice can be pretty varied. When I heard "Book of Saturday" I thought "Ok this guy can actually sing." And then I listened to "Starless" and honestly, it sounded like he was drunk and mumbling. So it depends on the song for the vocals.

It's true about being a Who's Who of prog rock musicians. Not to mention they stole Bill Bruford, drummer from Yes. It's pretty much if you've been in Crimson you've got some crazy stuff going on in your head. The good kind.
Gear:1991 Fender MIJ Jazz/Squier VM Fretless Jazz -> Pitchblack -> Way Huge Green Rhino -> Boss OC-2 -> Boss DD-7 -> Markbass Tube 800 -> SWR 4x12.

Flat wounds. Flat wounds on everything. Everything is a little fatter when it's flatter.