#1
So basically I've been primarily an acoustic player for a very long time until recently when I bought a 1961 Palmer ES-335. I'm loving this thing and all I have to play with in my house is a small Epiphone amp that came with a starter pack. Basically I need a good gig amp that can be heard over drums that will last me for a long time. My friend was going to sell me a Epiphone Valve Jr Half Stack but I'm not sure if the 5 watts will be enough and from what I've heard the amp isn't that great stock, you need a bit added on to it. So what is the best amp to buy that will be very reliable as well?
#2
You're correct. A five-watt amplifier isn't going to cut it. You need more wattage. If you are going to play gigs, you'll need at least thirty watts RMS out of a tube amplifier, or fifty watts out of a solid-state amplifier. If you are playing loud music, or if you have a bass player with a monster bass amp, then you will need more.

The type of music you play will guide your choice of amplifier to at least some degree. If you play mostly clean or classic rock with overdrive, any good tube amplifier will do. If you play metal or high-gain stuff, then you'll be best served by an amplifier designed for high-gain playing. These guidelines aren't absolute, though. You can play jazz through a Marshall and metal through a Fender. People do so all of the time.

Any good brand-name amplifier manufacturer is going to make something you can use. Stay away from the no-name brands and if in doubt, don't buy it. You need to decide a few things, though: how much can you spend? Do you want a combo amp or a separate head and speaker cabinet? Do you absolutely have to have a tube amplifier, or would a solid-state amp do? How big are the venues that you play?

Play through as many amplifiers as you can and decide what sounds best to your ears.

Good luck.
#3
I'm looking to go for a heavier gain type of sound. I'm going for either indie rock (think Manchester Orchestra/Brand New) or Post-Rock. Either way the amount of volume it can kick out is a big part of it. I'm not looking heavily for ones that have effects on it seeing as I'm getting effects pedals as my next step. I'm willing to spend around $500-$600 on it seeing as it should last me for quite some time. The gigs would be in local spots that probably won't have more than a couple hundred people tops. Basically as long as I can be playing with a full band and still sound loud then I'm okay with the amp.

When it comes to combo amps, halfstacks, and separate I am completely out of the loop and I'm going to be honest with you. I don't really get the difference of them or the true purpose that they serve. Thank you for being INCREDIBLY helpful though.
#4
Quote by lespaulsg09
I'm looking to go for a heavier gain type of sound. I'm going for either indie rock (think Manchester Orchestra/Brand New) or Post-Rock. Either way the amount of volume it can kick out is a big part of it. I'm not looking heavily for ones that have effects on it seeing as I'm getting effects pedals as my next step. I'm willing to spend around $500-$600 on it seeing as it should last me for quite some time. The gigs would be in local spots that probably won't have more than a couple hundred people tops. Basically as long as I can be playing with a full band and still sound loud then I'm okay with the amp.

When it comes to combo amps, halfstacks, and separate I am completely out of the loop and I'm going to be honest with you. I don't really get the difference of them or the true purpose that they serve. Thank you for being INCREDIBLY helpful though.


A combo amp is where the entire system (Pre-amp+Power-amp+speakers) is in one big shell. A Head is just the amp and has no speakers connected (which makes it physically lighter than a combo). However, a head makes no sound on it's own; you need a speaker cabinet (Or cab, as most people call them) and those can cost a bit. If you can carry heavy weights, combos are more movable; if you are el itty bitty weak man, try stacks. They're supposed to sound the same, but with the head/cab setup, you don't HAVE to pick the cab which they recommend (As opposed to a combo, where it's built in, and you don't really have a choice). You can get one good cab and then 10 heads, and, one at a time, play 'em. OR, you could get 10 combos. The 10 heads'd be cheaper, since it's a head+cab combined that makes it equal the price of a combo. In the long run, a head/cab would be cheaper, since you could buy another head without needing a new cab, and vice versa
Gear
---------
JS20S Satriani signature
Epiphone Les Paul Standard
Gibson SG Classic
Randall RM100 Combo w/ Plexi, JTM, Ultra, Recto, and Brown Modules
Last edited by Phantom123 at Oct 12, 2009,
#5
Quote by Phantom123
A combo amp is where the entire system (Pre-amp+Power-amp+speakers) is in one big shell. A Head is just the amp and has no speakers connected (which makes it physically lighter than a combo). However, a head makes no sound on it's own; you need a speaker cabinet (Or cab, as most people call them) and those can cost a bit. If you can carry heavy weights, combos are more movable; if you are el itty bitty weak man, try stacks. They're supposed to sound the same, but with the head/cab setup, you don't HAVE to pick the cab which they recommend (As opposed to a combo, where it's built in, and you don't really have a choice). You can get one good cab and then 10 heads, and, one at a time, play 'em. OR, you could get 10 combos. The 10 heads'd be cheaper, since it's a head+cab combined that makes it equal the price of a combo. In the long run, a head/cab would be cheaper, since you could buy another head without needing a new cab, and vice versa


Both posts, great advice. Listen to this guy.
Wait.



Roger Waters - 12th May!
#6
I guess a combo is probably more along my lines for the time being. My only problem being I don't really know where to start in terms of what to buy. Any recommendations on the best type of amp for the situation I've given?