#1
Looking for some piano technical excercises and where i can find instructions on fingering scale runs, anyone got a book or a link? id prefer if it wasnt a video, thanks!
#2
Chromatics is one exercise. Play with them.

Also, runs down over the white keys. I love that. You take a standard shape, 5-4-3-2-1 for example (eg. G-F-E-D-C) and then start over but one key lower (so F-E-D-C-B) etc. etc. Do that as fast as you can. You can do the same thing going up using 1-2-3-4-5.

Also fun is another shape, using again 1-2-3-4-5 but skipping one key between the 1 and the 2 and then finishing the run down again... Example C-E-F-G-A-G-F-E and then start it on the D. This can also be done going downwards.

As for fingering scale runs, I don't know what you mean exactly, but typically when going up and down a scale one uses:


Right hand:
C-D-E-F-G-A-B-C-D-E-F-G-A-B-C
1-2-3-1-2-3-4-1-2-3-1-2-3-4-5

Left hand:
C-D-E-F-G-A-B-C-D-E-F-G-A-B-C
5-4-3-2-1-3-2-1-4-3-2-1-3-2-1


Ofcourse it depends on what kind of runs you mean, but this is for straight scalair runs.

Hope I helped you...
#3
Quote by KoenDercksen
Chromatics is one exercise. Play with them.

Also, runs down over the white keys. I love that. You take a standard shape, 5-4-3-2-1 for example (eg. G-F-E-D-C) and then start over but one key lower (so F-E-D-C-B) etc. etc. Do that as fast as you can. You can do the same thing going up using 1-2-3-4-5.

Also fun is another shape, using again 1-2-3-4-5 but skipping one key between the 1 and the 2 and then finishing the run down again... Example C-E-F-G-A-G-F-E and then start it on the D. This can also be done going downwards.

As for fingering scale runs, I don't know what you mean exactly, but typically when going up and down a scale one uses:


Right hand:
C-D-E-F-G-A-B-C-D-E-F-G-A-B-C
1-2-3-1-2-3-4-1-2-3-1-2-3-4-5

Left hand:
C-D-E-F-G-A-B-C-D-E-F-G-A-B-C
5-4-3-2-1-3-2-1-4-3-2-1-3-2-1


Ofcourse it depends on what kind of runs you mean, but this is for straight scalair runs.

Hope I helped you...


I mean like, to do scale runs of every kind, not jsut c majer, nom sayin?
#4
Yea, you use the same finger pattern... There are some exceptions that will have you start on the second finger right, fourth finger left by the way. Just find a way that works for you.


Bb-C-D-Eb-F-G-A-Bb-C-D-Eb-F-G-A-Bb
1- 2-3-4- 1-2-3-1- 2-3-4- 1-2-3-4


For example, that's for the right hand. You will find this the easiest way to play this scale instead of the other way I mentioned earlier.
#7
Quote by bubbamc119
4 words: Hannon The Virtuoso Pianist.

Find a copy.


thanks, borrowed of the internet.
#8
I say don't bother with hanon.

Of the few exercises that I personally like, there are some that can be found in Pianoforte Technique on an Hour a Day and the Brahms 51 exercises, but frankly I don't really like or do exercises much. I find scales, chords and arpeggios to be sufficient. But if you insist on doing exercises, you can always derive them from the music you're playing.
#9
Hanon is good for stamina and the last book is great for techniques involved in harder piano pieces...Though they do sound very unmusical.

Brahms 51 exercises are great I had to play all of them for university and each one deals with an individual problem. Also if you are good at them you also have an advantage in playing Brahms pieces. I'd say pick a few from the first Hanon book and Brahms and remember to relax and stop if your hands hurt.

I find scales etc... are good up to a certain point, not all music is going to be in a scalic or arpeggio pattern... but great if your going to learn Bach for example.

Pieces that are good for evolving technique are etudes by Chopin and Liszt and also Bach for independence of hands; for octaves Rachmaninoff is good.

You should be able to find scales and fingerings on www.imslp.org.
Or get yourself a book on them.

Hope that helps.