#1
So recently ive decided to take a new approach to learning scales all over the fretboard, through using chords. Its alot easier than trying to just remember every single note, that's for sure.

I decided to use A major scale and find the A major chord in as many places as I could. So I started with the bar chord with its root not on 5th fret, 6th string, and worked my way up each string finding the A chord. I then remembered them all, got up a picture of the A major scale. Obviously all the A major chords fit perfectly into the A major scale.

But now ive run into a bit of a problem, just when I thought id had it all figured out. Not all the chords for the other notes of the scale are part of the actual scale.

For example, D Major with its root on the 5th fret, 5th string fits in with the A major scale, but D Major with its root on the 7th fret, 3rd string is one note missing because F is not in the A Major scale. This has just confused me really. I was expecting all the chords of the other notes to fit the scale too.

What im guessing is that the notes which make up the A Major chords of the scale are the only ones which are considered when the chords of the other notes of this scale are built up. Im not sure im right with this though. Id appreciate help on this.
#2
D Major doesn't have an F, it has an F#. That's your problem XD.
i don't know why i feel so dry
#3
Ah, bad example, my mistake. Ok, how about the G#. G# Major should fit into the A Major scale, but it doesn't as far as I can see. Can someone confirm this?
#5
Quote by mikeyb9m3bek
Ah, bad example, my mistake. Ok, how about the G#. G# Major should fit into the A Major scale, but it doesn't as far as I can see. Can someone confirm this?


G# Major - G# C D#
The A major Scale - A B C# D E F# G# A
#6
Quote by downey17
G# Major - G# C D#
The A major Scale - A B C# D E F# G# A


Indeed.


TS make sure you know your circle of fifths, it is very helpful.
#7
Quote by downey17
G# Major - G# C D#
The A major Scale - A B C# D E F# G# A


And this is what im struggling to understand. If the G# note is part of the A major scale, why isn't the chord G# Major part of it too?
#8
Quote by mikeyb9m3bek
And this is what im struggling to understand. If the G# note is part of the A major scale, why isn't the chord G# Major part of it too?


Look up the harmonised major scale. Just because a note is in the major scale does not mean its major chord fits into that scale. The first, fourth, and fifth notes are major, the second, third and sixth are minor and the seventh is diminished (in the most basic form)

A Major Scale - A B C# D E F# G#
Harmonised - Amajor Bminor C#minor Dmajor Emajor F#minor G#Diminished

Edit: That's not a very good explanation. Look it up for a better one
Last edited by downey17 at Oct 12, 2009,
#9
Quote by mikeyb9m3bek
And this is what im struggling to understand. If the G# note is part of the A major scale, why isn't the chord G# Major part of it too?


The order of chords in a major scale is this.


M m m M M m dim
A B C# D E F# G#


Capital M is major and lower case is minor and dim is dimished.


For every major scale these are the chords in it.

So as you can see G# is diminished in the A major scale, that is why G# major is not in the A major scale (there is a way longer explanation but this will do for now)
#10
Quote by downey17
G# Major - G# C D#
The A major Scale - A B C# D E F# G# A


The bolded is incorrect. G# major = G# B# D#