#1
I had a thought of how my band could record a full length without spending many thousands of dollars to our names and we will have time to get takes and tones we want:
-We would record drums at a pro studio and take 2-3 days to track drums, edit the parts, do some preliminary drum eq'ing, and do scratch tracks of guitar and such while the drums are tracking.
-We would buy some type of interface with pro tools le and a nice guitar/vocal mic or two and record guitar, bass, vocals, and anything else on our own.
-We would do the mixing on our own, and possibly send to a professional if we realize we aren't able to do it as well as we want on our own.
-Send to a professional for mastering.

What I am looking for is if it is possible for me to learn how to get good sounds and mixes with pro tools even though I have never used it. I have just used cheap programs and experimented with recording guitars and some really basic mixing. The quality we are going for is to beat the songs in my sig and have it professional sounding. This will probably be our last album if we aren't signed after it, as we would go to college and get full time jobs and not be able to put enough time into the band.

Also, what gear should I look into. I thought of maybe an M-box or something, but I don't know how good they sound. We would also need a good mic or two, all I have that is semi-nice is an SM57 which we would use as one of the mics on guitar amps.

So, discuss this idea with me please.
#2
I work in a small pro studio in Louisiana and depending on how much a studio charges per hour you may be better off tracking all the material there if you want better quality. If you want to try it on your own your best bet is an mbox-2 a couple sm-57 and a nice condenser mic for vocals like a BLUE Bluebird (only $300). But like I said if you buy this equipment you will be stuck with it if you never want to use it again or sell it for a fraction of what you paid. Pro Tools is also a bit to take on for a beginner My advice would be to track out all your songs in the studio and try a smaller studio for mixing. I mix from my home for $50-$100 per song depending on how many tracks how extensive the mix is things like that. Thats better than the $35/ hr the studio I work at charges. So ultimately the choice is yours but remember the equipment you buy could go toward more studio time and Pro Tools can be a bit to get your head around for a beginner. Hope this helps
#3
yeah that will work. but chances are if you aren't record direct in and deciding to be help full and already record the guitars with out using the direct in you'll **** over your mix engineer.

don't let mic the amps

let the engineers re-amp and track it


your also not going to have any fricken idea how to mix either man. it takes years to learn that ****. and thats just teaching your ears


i wouldn't use protools either its a bit assbackwards as **** to mix in. for me that is, but what you are missing is the fact that you can use free vsts that will give you great tone, for tracking, while the engineer will re-amp it etc etc.
#5
Quote by rockisalive
I work in a small pro studio in Louisiana and depending on how much a studio charges per hour you may be better off tracking all the material there if you want better quality. If you want to try it on your own your best bet is an mbox-2 a couple sm-57 and a nice condenser mic for vocals like a BLUE Bluebird (only $300). But like I said if you buy this equipment you will be stuck with it if you never want to use it again or sell it for a fraction of what you paid. Pro Tools is also a bit to take on for a beginner My advice would be to track out all your songs in the studio and try a smaller studio for mixing. I mix from my home for $50-$100 per song depending on how many tracks how extensive the mix is things like that. Thats better than the $35/ hr the studio I work at charges. So ultimately the choice is yours but remember the equipment you buy could go toward more studio time and Pro Tools can be a bit to get your head around for a beginner. Hope this helps


The studios around here are $30 an hour minimum, and with the math we did, it would cost $7k to record and mix a full length with an engineer in a studio, which is just not possible for us. It would be only $2k if we did it ourselves.


Quote by CatharsisStudio
yeah that will work. but chances are if you aren't record direct in and deciding to be help full and already record the guitars with out using the direct in you'll **** over your mix engineer.

don't let mic the amps

let the engineers re-amp and track it


your also not going to have any fricken idea how to mix either man. it takes years to learn that ****. and thats just teaching your ears


i wouldn't use protools either its a bit assbackwards as **** to mix in. for me that is, but what you are missing is the fact that you can use free vsts that will give you great tone, for tracking, while the engineer will re-amp it etc etc.


I might include a direct signal for guitar just to help us have choices to mix in, but I prefer the sound of a nice miced tube amp. One advantage of doing this by ourselves is I would be able to experiment with different amps, mics, tones, and techniques to get good tones.


^And to both, we were planning on doing the mixing ourselves. If all else fails, we have a friend who will help us for cheap if we really need it.

We do know some stuff about mixing and all have pretty good ears for tone and levels. I do understand this is no substitute for being a pro engineer and having education though.

Also, does anyone have experience with m-audio 410s or 610s. They are firewire interfaces.
#6
i had the profire 2626, getting another one


anywho okay you obviously have no idea what re-amping means.


you give them the DI they run it out of their daw into rmp box then into their tube amps, etc etc. or whatever


if you re-amp you can try it on billions of amps. etc etc.


what genre is the music btw? i'd offer mixing for 25 a song if i like the music! and the drums are already edited it'll be cheaper.


OH thats one thing even if it costs money HAVE THE STUDIO EDIT THOSE DRUMS it will make or break your cd
#7
I know what re-amping is. Most studios I know run the direct signal into virtual amp programs like amp farm, not into real tube amps.

The music is rock/progressive/indie, check sig for myspace. And we would do everything with drums except levels in the studio.

What would you recommend for an interface? We don't need 26 in/out like the profire, just probably 2 in for guitar, bass, and vocals. We just need something that is legit and pro sounding.