#1
Hi, I am a guitarist who is trying to become a melodic metalcore/melodic death metal guitarist. I was wondering:

What are some melodic chords? (Specifically in drop c tuning, but standard is fine.)

I do not know much theory, so sorry about that.

EDIT: when i say i dont know much music theory, i mean that i know the basics, but not much more than the major and minor scales
Slappa tha bass
Last edited by hootie37 at Oct 13, 2009,
#3
Quote by DespisedIcon
What do you mean?

Every chords can be melodic in a certain context.


But i mean chords that are typically used in melodic metal songs.
Slappa tha bass
#4
learn the harmonic minor scale... play power chords from that. That should get you started.
Self proclaimed prophets are great people...
#5
Same chords you would generally use. It all depends on how you put them together. Power chords are fine, really, as long as you put them in the right scale. Classical-influenced stuff is good--pentatonic probably isn't what you're looking for. Look up some harmonic minor scales and you'll get some chord progression ideas!
#7
A power chord progression... either a fifth fourth Power Chord, or a Fourth Fifth Power chord, your choice... BTW, basically
-7-------7-
-5-and-7- Im talking Intervals, learn them, it will help alot for when you need to know
-5-------5- how to get a certain sound at any time.
Maybe Minor arpeggio Chords, like
-4-------6-------5-
-5-and-7-and-7-
-7-------7-------7-
Just mess around with progressions, but this might get you started.

Now, go and learn your god damn Intervals.
#8
I'd like to point out that one can use the same scales and chords to write a pop song and a melodic death metal song. One could even use the same tempo(s). The difference is primarily in the instruments used and the phrasing.

That said, I'd recommend sticking to the minor scale at first for simplicity's sake. Take a simple melody and use that as the basis for your riffs. Where it seems appropriate, use double stops (two notes played at once) to emphasize a particular note and/or beat. Sixteenth note triplets are always helpful.
#9
i already primarily play double-stop minor scales riffs in drop c.
Slappa tha bass
#10
But how do they fit with the rest of the riff? Remember, a lot of melodic death metal is not in the notes used but the way in which they are played. I could write an effective death metal riff in C major if I so desired, provided I used the right phrasing and emphasized the right notes.
#11
Quote by Geldin
But how do they fit with the rest of the riff? Remember, a lot of melodic death metal is not in the notes used but the way in which they are played. I could write an effective death metal riff in C major if I so desired, provided I used the right phrasing and emphasized the right notes.


not well, my riffs usually turn out either thrashy or metalcore-ish, which is perfectly fine, but it is not the desired effect.
Slappa tha bass
#12
Listen to some death metal songs really closely. If you want, look at the tab. See how the riffs are constructed. There's a lot of overlap between early death metal and thrash. For example, some riffs from Death sound like riffs that would work equally well for a thrash band, especially Slayer.
#13
Chords are not melodic. In fact, they are quite the opposite.
Quote by dudetheman
So what? I wasted like 5 minutes watching DaddyTwoFoot's avatar.


Metalheads are the worst thing that ever happened to metal.
#14
Melodic = Notes played in a sequence (one after another).

Harmonic = Notes played simultaneously. <---Chords go here
#15
i would suggest add 9 chords. you can figure out your own fingerings for them to. an example would be c major standard tuning blah blah 8 fret ionian mode count 1 for c 2 for d 3 e blah blah now you standard major chord would just be 1 3 5 (c e g)but add 9 (or 2 in a higher octave "d") you can use all four notes or just 1 5 9 to get the same sound. also 7ths can be nice.... 11s... just mess with it you'll get some sick ideas.