Poll: Is French a dying luange??
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View poll results: Is French a dying luange??
yes
78 24%
no
251 76%
Voters: 329.
Page 1 of 6
#1
Is French a dying language?
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#3
Idk, but it makes for hot accents so I sure as **** hope not or there won't be any good foreign porn.


EDIT:

What is a "laguage"? And what about a "luage"?

#6
No, the French are proud of their language and make very active efforts to ensure that it doesn't die out or become corrupted.
"Why should we subsidise intellectual curiosity?"
-Ronald Reagan

"Knowledge is in every country the surest basis of public happiness."
-George Washington
#7
No. 100% of the French speak French...but if we eliminate the Fre-

Never mind.
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#8
I'm pretty sure they still speak it in France and lot of places in Africa as well. What a stupid question TS.
Edit: I forgot about Quebec and other parts of Canada.
Last edited by skaterskagg1 at Oct 13, 2009,
#9
no most high schools teach french
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#10
Well aslong as the whole of France keep speaking it...

Why? Does TS have reason to believe otherwise?
a little lost.....
#11
Ah yes, what with France, Quebec, and regions of Africa still actively speaking it, it'll be gone in no time.
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#13
0.o I dont think so. I mean, they teach it in schools, the French Canadians speak french, oh... and that one country, France? I think they speak it sometimes.


A dying language is latin. Who speaks that?
There is a war going on for your mind.

If you are thinking, you are winning.


Resistance is victory.


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Do not sit idly by.
#15
Quote by Fenderhippie69



A dying language is latin. Who speaks that?



Exactly. Latin is boring. I think schools should replace it with the traditional bush pygmy click language of Western Africa.

#17
Quote by Fenderhippie69
0.o I dont think so. I mean, they teach it in schools, the French Canadians speak french, oh... and that one country, France? I think they speak it sometimes.


A dying language is latin. Who speaks that?



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#18
Quote by skaterskagg1
I'm pretty sure they still speak it in France and lot of places in Africa as well. What a stupid question TS.

Not actually a stupid question at all. At least the French don't think so, that's why they have organisations set up to ensure the continuation of their language. Ever heard of the Académie française?
It is not a matter of no-one speaking French, it's more a matter of the language being corrupted by English words, which has been a problem.
"Why should we subsidise intellectual curiosity?"
-Ronald Reagan

"Knowledge is in every country the surest basis of public happiness."
-George Washington
Last edited by Ur all $h1t at Oct 13, 2009,
#19
Quote by Ur all $h1t
Not actually a stupid question at all. At least the French don't think so, that's why they have organisations set up to ensure the continuation of their language. Ever heard of the Académie française?
It is not a matter of no-one speaking French, it's more a matter of the language being corrupted by English words, which has been a problem.

Couldn't the same be said about any language then?
#21
Quote by Ur all $h1t
Not actually a stupid question at all. At least the French don't think so, that's why they have organisations set up to ensure the continuation of their language. Ever heard of the Académie française?
It is not a matter of no-one speaking French, it's more a matter of the language being corrupted by English words, which has been a problem.

Yeah, well, the French corrupted the English language first.
#22
Quote by skaterskagg1
Couldn't the same be said about any language then?

No. Not English anyway. The French, given that they have taken measures against Anglicisation, seem to be particularly concerned.
"Why should we subsidise intellectual curiosity?"
-Ronald Reagan

"Knowledge is in every country the surest basis of public happiness."
-George Washington
#23
Not in a lifetime. France will never give up French, even if they speak as if they had a dildo in the ass (yup, I'm from Quebec...), and Quebec is too damn proud of its culture to abandon it. Proof? La loi 101. Look it up.

Plus, they still give the French option in american schools.
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#24
Quote by Ur all $h1t
No. Not English anyway. The French, given that they have taken measures against Anglicisation, seem to be particularly concerned.

What about German or Spanish or other languages adopting English words? Do they just not care and are letting it happen then?
#25
Quote by Turkeyburger
I hope so. I hate French.

Outta sheer curiosity. What for?
There is a war going on for your mind.

If you are thinking, you are winning.


Resistance is victory.


We are building up a new world.
Do not sit idly by.
#26
Quote by skaterskagg1
What about German or Spanish or other languages adopting English words? Do they just not care and are letting it happen then?

Certainly not to my knowledge, they either don't care as much, or it isn't as big an issue for them.
"Why should we subsidise intellectual curiosity?"
-Ronald Reagan

"Knowledge is in every country the surest basis of public happiness."
-George Washington
#27
Our French province nearly seceded from us to contain their cultural identity. I'd say it's doing fine.
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#28
Quote by Ur all $h1t
Certainly not to my knowledge, they either don't care as much, or it isn't as big an issue for them.

So to your knowledge, it's only the French(maybe others) who are specifically trying to stop English from being adapted into their language? Intriguing.
#29
Every language is bound to either die or move on.
In some way, old English has died already.
Some day, today's French will be old French and will have evolved.

Unless we all learn Esperanto.
#30
Quote by Fenderhippie69
0.o I dont think so. I mean, they teach it in schools, the French Canadians speak french, oh... and that one country, France? I think they speak it sometimes.


A dying language is latin. Who speaks that?

Ego proper, commradus.

(Tuur homi vindico)
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#32
Quote by skaterskagg1
So to your knowledge, it's only the French(maybe others) who are specifically trying to stop English from being adapted into their language? Intriguing.

Yep. A quick google search reveals nothing similar about anywhere else.
"Why should we subsidise intellectual curiosity?"
-Ronald Reagan

"Knowledge is in every country the surest basis of public happiness."
-George Washington
#33
this thread reminds me of a question I was considering the other day.

so in english, for example, if one wants to very specifically describe an event, there are multiple words to do so.

ex: I ambled down the path rather than I walked down the road.

do very specific descriptive words like these exist in all languages? In english, we sometimes have a large amount of different words which more or less express the same idea.
...Nothing you've ever...
...Planned on ever turned out...
...The way you planned...


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#34
Quote by Ur all $h1t
No. Not English anyway. The French, given that they have taken measures against Anglicisation, seem to be particularly concerned.

Wait what, English language's entire foundations are based on French, plus we still use French terms from antiquity such as bourgeoisie, fillet, god there are millions of French words in common usage for the average English speaking person.
#35
Quote by st.stephen
Wait what, English language's entire foundations are based on French, plus we still use French terms from antiquity such as bourgeoisie, fillet, god there are millions of French words in common usage for the average English speaking person.

Yep, but we don't have a constant erosion like the French do.
"Why should we subsidise intellectual curiosity?"
-Ronald Reagan

"Knowledge is in every country the surest basis of public happiness."
-George Washington
#36
Quote by Its_Rock77
this thread reminds me of a question I was considering the other day.

so in english, for example, if one wants to very specifically describe an event, there are multiple words to do so.

ex: I ambled down the path rather than I walked down the road.

do very specific descriptive words like these exist in all languages? In english, we sometimes have a large amount of different words which more or less express the same idea.


Without those descriptive words, writing and literature and poetry wouldn't be nearly as interesting or entertaining or beautiful. But, when we need to get a point across and don't need details and lots of description, we have simple, short words that do nothing but give the message.

#37
Quote by st.stephen
Wait what, English language's entire foundations are based on French.

Not so much entirely based on French as much as it is based on Romance languages in general.
#38
Given the fact that ~220,000,000 people worldwide speak French in some capacity, I would say no, it is not.
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#39
Quote by Its_Rock77
this thread reminds me of a question I was considering the other day.

so in english, for example, if one wants to very specifically describe an event, there are multiple words to do so.

ex: I ambled down the path rather than I walked down the road.

do very specific descriptive words like these exist in all languages? In english, we sometimes have a large amount of different words which more or less express the same idea.

Of course they do, languages would be rather dull and one dimensional without a selection of words.

To answer the OP it's not dying. As said the French actively defend their language from English influence for example, not to mention parts of Canada and North Africa speak it.
Last edited by aaronni at Oct 13, 2009,
#40
Quote by skaterskagg1
Not so much entirely based on French as much as it is based on Romance languages in general.

Through extension, but when the French took over England I would say that had a direct effect on shaping the English language and changing it from a Scandinavian dialect into a hybrid "Romance language." But yeah, the Romans were in England long before that so that had an effect I guess the fact remains that English is one fucked up, convoluted language and that despite that can be incredibly beautiful, while French can just be incredibly beautiful.