#1
This might sound odd or is an unusual thing to ask for help for but when I'm thumping out a Bass or plucking a Bass note and treble note at the same time I notice I pluck them with the same strength. Maybe even stronger for the Bass. This is a problem since I'll want the treble notes to sound lound and strong and the bass to be more background if you can understand. The bass sometime muffles(?) or covers up the treble for it to have a piercing sound. I hope that made sense. Wondering if anyone else has had something similar. help
#2
make the treble note a "pressed" note (that's how it's called in spanish, i dont know the english term lol). just pluck it real hard and make your finger rest on the string above. for the bass, make the thumb move sideways, that way the note wont be too loud. Look at some clasical guitar lessons, that's a basic.

EDIT: here are 2 pics of something like what you should do:

GRUPO EN ESPAÑOL

SI BUSCAS BANDA EN LATINOAMERICA O ESPAÑA, ENTRA AQUI
Last edited by ldnovelo at Oct 14, 2009,
#3
Just practice what you want to do. Some folks use a little palm mute on the bass strings. It's a nice effect for many songs and will reduce the volume.

I assume you're playing acoustic.
#4
Without nails, it can be quite hard to achieve proper dynamics unless you've got callouses - bare fingertips will force you to pick everything quite hard. With nails, it's all about moderating the strength of the pluck for each finger.
#5
Quote by ldnovelo
make the treble note a "pressed" note (that's how it's called in spanish, i dont know the english term lol). just pluck it real hard and make your finger rest on the string above. for the bass, make the thumb move sideways, that way the note wont be too loud. Look at some clasical guitar lessons, that's a basic.


Thumb moved sideways? I'm playing with my nail and when you say rest the string above Im assuming you dont mean touching.

Quote by WalterMitty
Just practice what you want to do. Some folks use a little palm mute on the bass strings. It's a nice effect for many songs and will reduce the volume.

I assume you're playing acoustic.


hmm palm mute. Something I havent practiced on since I first started. Lets see how it goes.
#6
Quote by Thepredster
Thumb moved sideways? I'm playing with my nail and when you say rest the string above Im assuming you dont mean touching.

I suspect he does mean that. If you're playing the second string, rest a right-hand finger on the first. That will mute the string if you hit it by mistake, and give you more leverage to dig into thise treble strings.
#7
Quote by jean_genie
I suspect he does mean that. If you're playing the second string, rest a right-hand finger on the first. That will mute the string if you hit it by mistake, and give you more leverage to dig into thise treble strings.

No one should actually have to do that. I'm sorry but that's a bit pathetic if that's actually what he meant.
#8
Palm muting-It does significant reduce the volume but I feel it sound muffled. I might just be doing it wrong and it does reduce it to much every now and then. bleh


Quote by i_don't_know
Without nails, it can be quite hard to achieve proper dynamics unless you've got callouses - bare fingertips will force you to pick everything quite hard. With nails, it's all about moderating the strength of the pluck for each finger.


Yeah....which is what I'm asking help for. Simple concept, Just advice on how to better practice it.

Quote by jean_genie
I suspect he does mean that. If you're playing the second string, rest a right-hand finger on the first. That will mute the string if you hit it by mistake, and give you more leverage to dig into thise treble strings.


I dont think anyone would come down on the string so hard that they need to mute the below it especially on a classical guitar. Btw this is being practiced on my Classical